The ROI of Transparency: A Consumer Market Research Study

The ROI of Transparency: A Consumer Market Research Study

One in five of U.S. consumers choose a transparent brand as their first choice. Are you ready for a wave of new customers? The ROI of Transparency: A Consumer Market Research Study provides critical insights into consumer behavior and transparency’s value to your company.

This report will guide your transparency efforts with data-driven implementation methods. You’ll learn what transparent practices to prioritize — real actionable steps — for the greatest return on investment.

In addition to the main report, you can choose a bundle that includes the main report plus four industry-specific special reports:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Vitamins & Supplements
  • Personal Care
  • Clothing & Apparel
And here’s the good news for you (and why you need to start now). Everybody — consumers, industry, trade groups — is talking about transparency, but not many companies are actually doing it. Companies that invest in transparency have a competitive advantage. And many of them use it as a cornerstone to growth.

Why wait before others get that 20%? Or the additional 26% of consumers who look for transparent brands when in the store? Or the additional 27% who consider transparency as one of their buying variables? When you add all three groups, that’s 73% of the population.

The ROI of Transparency illustrates why investing in transparency is not only the present — it’s the future.

This report will also help you:
  • Understand how important transparency really is. To your brand, to your industry, and most significantly to your customers.
  • Know what kinds of customers will reward you for your transparency efforts, and those that say they might, but really won’t.
  • Get data that will specifically inform you about how much or little to invest in transparency, and where to do so. In other words, what transparency practices will give you the best return on investment.


MAIN REPORT
Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Study Background and Objectives
Chapter 2: Executive Summary
Meet the Transparents
High Transparents
Regular Transparents
Low-to-No Transparents
Generations
Millennials
Generation X
Baby Boomers
Shopping Channels
Natural Shoppers
Conventional Shoppers
The Prime Transparent
Chapter 3: Methodology, Screening Criteria, Respondent Pool
Methodology and Screening Criteria
Natural Shoppers
Fielding
Basic Demographics
Gender
Generation
Shopping Channel
Geographic Profile
Ethnicity and Race
Income and Education
Chapter 4: Company Transparency
Awareness of Transparency
Awareness of Transparency on the Rise
Defining Transparency
“Nontransparency” Definition
Brand Characteristics
Most Transparent Companies, Organizations, and Industries
Rise in Industry Transparency
The Value of Transparency
Purchase Intent
Purchasing Decision
Spending More on Transparent Companies
Why Not Paying More
Benefits of Transparency
Demonstrating Transparency
Transparency Practices
Brand Affinity
Descriptions of Most-Liked Brands
Chosen Brand: Reasons for Liking
Chosen Brand: Rating Aspects of Transparency
Perception of Brand Lies
Perception of Brand Lies from Brands Purchased
Chapter 5: Transparency through the Lens of Belief in Transparency
Meet the Transparents
High, Regular, and Low-to-No Transparents
Where They Shop
Product Attributes
What Transparency Means to Them
How Companies Can Best Demonstrate Transparency
What Types of Companies Are Most Transparent
Rise in Awareness of Transparency
Why the High Transparents Matter
Why Transparency Affects Purchasing Decisions
Ethics Matter to Those Who Care about Transparency
How High Transparents Behave
What Kinds of Brands Appeal to the Transparents
How to Reach the Transparents
Chapter 6: Transparency through the Lens of Generation
Where They Shop
Product Attributes
What Transparency Means to Them
Level of Belief in Transparency
How Companies Can Best Demonstrate Transparency
Types of Companies Perceived as the Most Transparent
How Expectations Translate into Purchasing Decisions
Reasons Why Transparency Is Important to the Purchasing Decision
Ethics Matter to All . . . but That Is Not All
How Generations Differ in the Way They See the World
What Kinds of Brands Appeal to Them
What to Prioritize When Increasing Transparency
How to Reach the Generations
Chapter 7: Transparency through the Lens of Channels—Natural versus Conventional
How We Defined “Natural Shopper”
Product Attributes
What Transparency Means to Them
Valuing Transparency
How to Best Demonstrate Transparency
What Types of Companies Are Most Transparent
How Transparency Influences Purchase Intent
Reasons Why Transparency Is So Appealing to the Purchasing Decision
How Channels Differ in the Way They See the World
What Kinds of Brands Appeal to Consumers
What to Prioritize When Increasing Transparency
Political Beliefs
How to Reach Them
Chapter 8 - Prime Transparent
List Of Figures
Figure 3-1: Geographic Representation
Figure 3-2: Ethnicity and Race
Figure 3-3: Household Income
Figure 3-4: Levels of Education
Figure 4-1: Awareness of Transparency
Figure 4-2: Rise in Awareness of Transparency
Figure 4-3: Definition of Company Transparency
Figure 4-4: Definition of a Nontransparent Company
Figure 4-5: Most-Valued Brand Characteristics
Figure 4-6: Industries Perceived as Most Transparent
Figure 4-7: Expectation of Transparency by Industry
Figure 4-8: Value of Transparency
Figure 4-9: Transparency in Relation to Purchasing Decision
Figure 4-10: Spending More on Transparent Companies
Figure 4-11: Reasons for Not Paying More to a Transparent Company
Figure 4-12: Benefits of Transparency
Figure 4-13: Approaches to Demonstrating Transparency
Figure 4-14: Practices That Best Represent a Transparent Company
Figure 4-15: Descriptions of Most-Liked Brands
Figure 4-16: Reasons for Liking a Chosen Brand
Figure 4-17: Rating Aspects of Transparency for Chosen Brand
Figure 4-18: Belief That Most Brands Lie At Least Some of the Time
Figure 4-19: Belief That Purchased Brands Lie At Least Some of the Time
Figure 5-1: The Transparents
Figure 5-2: Transparents: Where Supplements Are Bought
Figure 5-3: Transparents: Where Food and Beverages Are Bought
Figure 5-4: Transparents: Where Personal Care Is Bought
Figure 5-5: Transparents: Where Clothing Is Bought
Figure 5-6: Transparents: Most-Valued Brand Characteristics
Figure 5-7: Transparents: Definition of Company Transparency
Figure 5-8: Transparents: Definition of a Nontransparent Company
Figure 5-9: Transparents: Approaches to Demonstrating Transparency
Figure 5-10: Transparents: Industries Perceived as Most Transparent
Figure 5-11: Transparents: Level of Industry Transparency
Figure 5-12: Transparents: Rise in Awareness of Transparency
Figure 5-13: Transparents: Expectations of Transparency by Industry
Figure 5-14: Transparents: Transparency in Relation to Purchasing Decision
Figure 5-15: Transparents: Spending More on a Transparent Company
Figure 5-16: Transparents: Reasons for Not Paying More to a Transparent Company
Figure 5-17: Transparents: Benefits of Transparency
Figure 5-18: Transparents: Practices That Best Represent a Transparent Company
Figure 5-19: Transparents: Defining a Lie
Figure 5-20: Transparents: Defining Ethical Standards
Figure 5-21: Transparents: Belief That Most Brands Lie at Least Some of the Time
Figure 5-22: Transparents: Belief That Purchased Brands Lie at Least Some of the Time
Figure 5-23: Transparents: Reasons for Liking a Chosen Liked Brand
Figure 5-24: Transparents: Company Website Interaction
Figure 5-25: Transparents: Reasons for Visiting a Company Website
Figure 5-26: Transparents: Health and Wellness Media Habits
Figure 6-1: Generations: Where Supplements Are Bought
Figure 6-2: Generations: Where Food and Beverages Are Bought
Figure 6-3: Generations: Where Personal Care Is Bought
Figure 6-4 Generations: Where Clothing Is Bought
Figure 6-5: Generations: Most-Valued Brand Characteristics
Figure 6-6: Generations: Definition of Company Transparency
Figure 6-7: Generations: Value of Transparency
Figure 6-8: Generations: Approaches to Demonstrating Transparency
Figure 6-9: Generations: Industries Perceived as Most Transparent
Figure 6-10: Generations: Expectation of Transparency by Industry
Figure 6-11: Generations: Transparency in Relation to Purchasing Decision
Figure 6-12: Generations: Spending More on Transparent Companies
Figure 6-13: Generations: Reasons for Not Paying More to a Transparent Company
Figure 6-14: Generations: Benefits of Transparency
Figure 6-15: Generations: Practices That Best Represent a Transparent Company
Figure 6-16: Generations: Defining a Lie
Figure 6-17: Generations: Defining Ethical Standards
Figure 6-18: Generations: Belief That Most Brands Lie At Least Some of the Time
Figure 6-19: Generations: Descriptions of Most-Liked Brands
Figure 6-20: Generations: Reasons for Liking a Chosen Brand
Figure 6-21: Generations: Rating Aspects of Transparency for Chosen Brand
Figure 6-22: Generations: Company Website Interaction
Figure 6-23: Generations: Reasons for Visiting a Company Website
Figure 6-24: Generations: Facts versus Intuition
Figure 6-25: Generations: Empathy versus Logic
Figure 6-26: Generations: Health and Wellness Media Habits
Figure 7-1: Channels: Most-Valued Brand Characteristics
Figure 7-2: Channels: Definition of Company Transparency
Figure 7-3: Channels: Value of Transparency
Figure 7-4: Channels: Approaches to Demonstrating Transparency
Figure 7-5: Channels: Industries Perceived as Most Transparent
Figure 7-6: Channels: Levels of Industry Transparency
Figure 7-7: Channels: Expectation of Transparency by Industry
Figure 7-8: Channels: Transparency in Relation to Purchasing Decision
Figure 7-9: Channels: Spending More on Transparent Companies’ Products
Figure 7-10: Channels: Descriptions of Most-Liked Brands
Figure 7-11: Channels: Reasons for Liking a Chosen Brand
Figure 7-12: Generations: Rating Aspects of Transparency for Chosen Brand
Figure 7-13: Channels: Political Leanings
Figure 7-14: Channels: Company Website Interaction
Figure 7-15: Channels: Reasons for Visiting a Company Website
Figure 7-16: Channels: Health and Wellness Media Habits
Figure 8-1: Prime Transparents: Reasons for Visiting a Company Website
Figure 8-2: Prime Transparents: Practices That Best Represent a Transparent Company
Vitamin and Supplement: Introduction
Executive Summary
Understanding Why Consumers Like Certain Vitamin and Supplement Brands
Characteristics of the Vitamin and Supplement Brands Consumers Like to Buy
Reasons for Liking a Chosen Brand
The Relationship between Transparency and Quality
The Relationship between Transparency and Shopping Habits
Most Important Aspects of Transparency
Most Important Aspects of Transparency for Specific Brand Liked
Most Important Practices to Be Transparent
Purchase Intent
Belief in Vitamin and Supplement Brand Integrity
How Dialogue Impacts Purchase Decisions
Enough versus More Information
Admitting to Mistakes
The Power of Video
Transparency, Trust, and Purchase Intent
Specific Elements to Capture
Best Way to Shoot the Video
The Power of the Traceability App
Traceability and Transparency
Traceability and Trust
Traceability and Purchase Intent
Transparency in Relation to Regulations
Influencing and Reaching Transparents, Generations, and Channels
List Of Figures
Figure 1-1: Vitamin and Supplement: Descriptions of Most-Liked Brands
Figure 1-2: Vitamin and Supplement: Reasons for Liking a Chosen Brand
Figure 1-3: Vitamin and Supplement: Transparency and Perception of Quality
Figure 1-4: Vitamin and Supplement: Transparency and Shopping Habits
Figure 1-5: Vitamin and Supplement: Rating Transparent Areas of a Chosen Liked Brand
Figure 1-6: Vitamin and Supplement: Practices That Should Be Most Transparent
Figure 1-7: Vitamin and Supplement: Likelihood to Pay More for Transparency
Figure 1-8: Vitamin and Supplement: Belief That Most Brands Lie At Least Some of the Time
Figure 1-9: Vitamin and Supplement: Belief That Purchased Brands Lie At Least Some of the Time
Figure 1-10: Vitamin and Supplement: Less versus More Transparent Company Purchase Intent
Figure 1-11: Vitamin and Supplement: Forgiving versus Understanding of Company Mistakes
Figure 1-12: Vitamin and Supplement: Corporate Video—Level of Transparency
Figure 1-13: Vitamin and Supplement: Corporate Video—Level of Trust
Figure 1-14: Vitamin and Supplement: Corporate Video—Level of Purchase Intent
Figure 1-15: Vitamin and Supplement: Corporate Video—People Elements That Represent Transparency
Figure 1-16: Vitamin and Supplement: Corporate Video—Process Elements That Represent Transparency
Figure 1-17: Vitamin and Supplement: Corporate Video—Shooting Style That Represents Transparency
Figure 1-18: Vitamin and Supplement: Traceability—Level of Transparency
Figure 1-19: Vitamin and Supplement: Traceability—Company Is Trustworthy
Figure 1-20: Vitamin and Supplement: Traceability—Likelihood of Buying
Figure 1-21: Vitamin and Supplement: Regulatory Agency Effectiveness
Figure 1-22: Vitamin and Supplement: Transparency Beyond Regulations
Figure 1-23: Vitamin and Supplement: Where Information Is Found
Food and Beverage Introduction
Executive Summary
Understanding Why Consumers Like Certain Food and Beverage Brands
Characteristics of the Food and Beverage Brands Consumers Like to Buy
Reasons for Liking a Chosen Liked Brand
The Relationship between Transparency and Quality
The Relationship between Transparency and Shopping Habits
Most Important Aspects of Transparency
Most Important Aspects of Transparency for Specific Brand Liked
Most Important Practices to Be Transparent
Purchase Intent
Belief in Food and Beverage Brand Integrity
How Dialogue Impacts Purchase Decisions
Enough versus More Information
Admitting to Mistakes
The Power of Video
Transparency, Trust, and Purchase Intent
Specific Elements to Capture
Best Way to Shoot the Video
The Power of the Traceability App
Traceability and Transparency
Traceability and Trust
Traceability and Purchase Intent
Transparency in Relation to Regulations
Influencing and Reaching Transparents, Generations, and Channels
List Of Figures
Figure 1-1: Food and Beverage: Descriptions of Most-Liked Brands
Figure 1-2: Food and Beverage: Reasons for Liking a Chosen Liked Brand
Figure 1-3: Food and Beverage: Transparency and Perception of Quality
Figure 1-4: Food and Beverage: Transparency and Shopping Habits
Figure 1-5: Food and Beverage: Rating Transparent Areas of a Chosen Liked Brand
Figure 1-6: Food and Beverage: Practices That Should Be Most Transparent
Figure 1-7: Food and Beverage: Likelihood to Pay More for Transparency
Figure 1-8: Food and Beverage: Belief That Most Brands Lie At Least Some of the Time
Figure 1-9: Food and Beverage: Belief That Purchased Brands Lie At Least Some of the Time
Figure 1-10: Food and Beverage: Less versus More Transparent Company Purchase Intent
Figure 1-11: Food and Beverage: Forgiving versus Understanding of Company Mistakes
Figure 1-12: Food and Beverage: Corporate Video—Level of Transparency
Figure 1-13: Food and Beverage: Corporate Video—Level of Trust
Figure 1-14: Food and Beverage: Corporate Video—Level of Purchase Intent
Figure 1-15: Food and Beverage: Corporate Video—People Elements That Represent Transparency
Figure 1-16: Food and Beverage: Corporate Video—Process Elements That Represent Transparency
Figure 1-17: Food and Beverage: Corporate Video—Shooting Style That Represents Transparency
Figure 1-18: Food and Beverage: Traceability—Level of Transparency
Figure 1-19: Food and Beverage: Traceability—Company Is Trustworthy
Figure 1-20: Food and Beverage: Traceability—Likelihood of Buying
Figure 1-21: Food and Beverage: Regulatory Agency Effectiveness
Figure 1-22: Food and Beverage: Transparency Beyond Regulations
Figure 1-23: Food and Beverage: Where Information Is Found
Personal Care Introduction
Executive Summary
Understanding Why Consumers Like Certain Personal Care Brands
Characteristics of Personal Care Brands Consumers Like to Buy
Reasons for Liking a Chosen Liked Brand
The Relationship between Transparency and Quality
The Relationship between Transparency and Shopping Habits
Most Important Aspects of Transparency
Most Important Aspects of Transparency for Specific Brand Liked
Most Important Practices to Be Transparent
Purchase Intent
Belief in Personal Care Brand Integrity
How Dialogue Impacts Purchase Decisions
Enough versus More Information
Admitting to Mistakes
The Power of Video
Transparency, Trust, and Purchase Intent
Specific Elements to Capture
Best Way to Shoot the Video
The Power of the Traceability App
Traceability and Transparency
Traceability and Trust
Traceability and Purchase Intent
Transparency in Relation to Regulations
Influencing and Reaching Transparents, Generations, and Channels
List Of Figures
Figure 1-1: Personal Care: Descriptions of Most-Liked Brands
Figure 1-2: Personal Care: Reasons for Liking a Chosen Liked Brand
Figure 1-3: Personal Care: Transparency and Perception of Quality
Figure 1-4: Personal Care: Transparency and Shopping Habits
Figure 1-5: Personal Care: Rating Transparent Areas of a Chosen Liked Brand
Figure 1-6: Personal Care: Practices That Should Be Most Transparent
Figure 1-7: Personal Care: Likelihood to Pay More for Transparency
Figure 1-8: Personal Care: Belief That Most Brands Lie At Least Some of the Time
Figure 1-9: Personal Care: Belief That Purchased Brands Lie At Least Some of the Time
Figure 1-10: Personal Care: Less versus More Transparent Company Purchase Intent
Figure 1-11: Personal Care: Forgiving versus Understanding of Company Mistakes
Figure 1-12: Personal Care: Corporate Video—Level of Transparency
Figure 1-13: Personal Care: Corporate Video—Level of Trust
Figure 1-14: Personal Care: Corporate Video—Level of Purchase Intent
Figure 1-15: Personal Care: Corporate Video—People Elements That Represent Transparency
Figure 1-16: Personal Care: Corporate Video—Process Elements That Represent Transparency
Figure 1-17: Personal Care: Corporate Video—Shooting Style That Represents Transparency
Figure 1-18: Personal Care: Traceability—Level of Transparency
Figure 1-19: Personal Care: Traceability—Company Is Trustworthy
Figure 1-20: Personal Care: Traceability—Likelihood of Buying
Figure 1-21: Personal Care: Regulatory Agency Effectiveness
Figure 1-22: Personal Care: Transparency Beyond Regulations
Figure 1-23: Personal Care: Where Information Is Found
Clothing and Apparel Introduction
Executive Summary
Understanding Why Consumers Like Certain Clothing and Apparel Brands
Characteristics of Clothing and Apparel Brands Consumers Like to Buy
Clothing and Apparel Brands Consumers Chose to Like
The Relationship between Transparency and Quality
The Relationship between Transparency and Shopping Habits
Most Important Aspects of Transparency
Most Important Aspects of Transparency for Specific Brand Liked
Most Important Practices to Be Transparent
Purchase Intent
Belief in Clothing and Apparel Brand Integrity
How Dialogue Impacts Purchase Decisions
Enough versus More Information
Admitting to Mistakes
The Power of Video
Transparency, Trust, and Purchase Intent
Specific Elements to Capture
Best Way to Shoot the Video
The Power of the Traceability App
Traceability and Transparency
Traceability and Trust
Traceability and Purchase Intent
Transparency in Relation to Regulations
List Of Figures
Figure 1-1: Clothing and Apparel: Descriptions of Most-Liked Brands
Figure 1-2: Clothing and Apparel: Reasons for Liking a Chosen Liked Brand
Figure 1-3: Clothing and Apparel: Transparency and Perception of Quality
Figure 1-4: Clothing and Apparel: Transparency and Shopping Habits
Figure 1-5: Clothing and Apparel: Rating Transparent Areas of a Chosen Liked Brand
Figure 1-6: Clothing and Apparel: Practices That Should Be Most Transparent
Figure 1-7: Clothing and Apparel: Likelihood to Pay More for Transparency
Figure 1-8: Clothing and Apparel: Belief That Most Brands Lie At Least Some of the Time
Figure 1-9: Clothing and Apparel: Belief That Purchased Brands Lie At Least Some of the Time
Figure 1-10: Clothing and Apparel: Less versus More Transparent Company Purchase Intent
Figure 1-11: Clothing and Apparel: Forgiving versus Understanding of Company Mistakes
Figure 1-12: Clothing and Apparel: Corporate Video—Level of Transparency
Figure 1-13: Clothing and Apparel: Corporate Video—Level of Trust
Figure 1-14: Clothing and Apparel: Corporate Video—Level of Purchase Intent
Figure 1-15: Clothing and Apparel: Corporate Video—People Elements That Represent Transparency
Figure 1-16: Clothing and Apparel: Corporate Video—Process Elements That Represent Transparency
Figure 1-17: Clothing and Apparel: Corporate Video—Shooting Style That Represents Transparency
Figure 1-18: Clothing and Apparel: Traceability—Level of Transparency
Figure 1-19: Clothing and Apparel: Traceability—Company Is Trustworthy
Figure 1-20: Clothing and Apparel: Traceability—Likelihood of Buying
Figure 1-21: Clothing and Apparel: Regulatory Agency Effectiveness
Figure 1-22: Clothing and Apparel: Transparency Beyond Regulations
Figure 1-23: Clothing and Apparel: Where Information Is Found

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