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Healthy Dining Trends - US - July 2015

Healthy Dining Trends - US - July 2015

As Americans continue to be plagued with chronic diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular issues, diabetes, etc, there is rising interest on the part of consumers to eat for better health. Since they visit restaurants so often, they seek better-for-you (BFY) restaurant foods. However, foodservice operators still struggle with providing foods that are healthier (and often costlier), while still delivering on taste. While there are more healthy-positioned items on the menus, consumer demand for items that fit into their diets (eg gluten- and allergen-free, etc) and that are more natural continues to rise. Operators who address these challenges will gain the loyalty of the more nutritionally conscious consumer.

This report looks at the following areas:

Consumers are focused on eating healthier
While focused on health, fast food is a regular reality for many
Consumers dine at home more, because it’s healthier


OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Definition
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The issues
Figure 1: Attitudes and Opinions about Diet and Health, February 2014-March 2015
Figure 2: Types of restaurants consumers visit, April 2015
The opportunities
Figure 3: Changes in eating behaviors, more, April 2015
Figure 4: Attitudes toward healthy menu descriptors, by generation, April 2015
Figure 5: Behaviors associated with beverages in restaurants, by Hispanic origin, April 2015
Figure 6: Attitudes about eating healthy in restaurants, by age of children in household, April 2015
What it means
THE MARKET
What you need to know
Despite a desire for better health, consumers still visit fast food places the most
Consumers find it difficult to dine healthy when out with friends
Consumers find healthier foods to be expensive
Market factors
Consumers want to be healthier
Figure 7: Attitudes and Opinions about Diet and Health, February 2014-March 2015
Consumers dine out frequently and fast food is affordable
Figure 8: Types of restaurants consumers visit, April 2015
Healthier foods must be more affordable, especially for younger consumers
Figure 9: Median household income in US dollars, by age of householder, 2013
Obesity continues to plague Americans
Figure 10: Percentage of men aged 20 or older who are obese, by age and obesity 1* grade, 2009-12
Figure 11: Percentage of women aged 20 or older who are obese, by obesity 1* grade, 2009-12
KEY PLAYERS
What you need to know
Foodservice is focusing more on health
The customization of restaurant foods is extending to specific diets
Consumers are focused on the purity of their foods
What’s working?
Foodservice marketers focus on health
What’s next?
Dietitian-approved restaurant meals
Natural and minimally processed foods
Keep a watchful eye on sodium
THE CONSUMER
What you need to know
Consumers say they want to eat healthier but still visit fast food restaurants frequently
More people are eating at home because it’s healthier
Consumers need more menu information to make better choices
Consumers visit fast food most often, despite focus on health
Older Millennials gravitate to a variety of restaurant types
Figure 12: Types of restaurants consumers visit, April 2015
Figure 13: Types of restaurants consumers visit, by generation, April 2015
Affordability drives fast food sales
Higher income leads to higher interest in natural foods
Figure 14: Types of restaurants consumers visit, by gender and age, Men, April 2015
Figure 15: Types of restaurants consumers visit, by gender and age, Women, April 2015
Figure 16: Changes in eating behaviors at restaurants, More, ages 18-34 by income. April 2015
Consumers clean their plates
They find it hard to eat healthy when dining with friends
Figure 17: Attitudes about eating healthy in restaurants, by age, April 2015
Figure 18: Eating habits while dining out, by age, April 2015
Eating at home more for health
Consumers looking for better control of their diets
Figure 19: Changes in eating behaviors at restaurants, more, April 2015
Consumers drawn to “fresh” descriptors
Older consumers seek descriptors to help with diets
Figure 20: Attitudes toward healthy menu descriptors, by generation, April 2015
Figure 21: Healthy menu descriptors preferred, by gender, April 2015
Beverages are an easy way for women to cut calories
Soda continues to decline and beverages resonate less with women than men
Figure 22: Attitudes regarding beverages in restaurants, by gender, April 2015
Middle income earners want more menu information
A higher income makes eating healthy more affordable
Figure 23: Attitudes about eating healthy in restaurants, by income, April 2015
Parents seek purer foods for younger children
Fathers have more income to eat healthy than mothers do
Figure 24: Attitudes about eating healthy in restaurants, by parents, April 2015
Figure 25: Healthy menu descriptors preferred, by age of children in household, April 2015
Social media users are frequent restaurant visitors
Social media users visit restaurants more often and are more discerning
Figure 26: Frequency of restaurant visits, by use of social media, April 2015
Figure 27: Healthy eating attitudes, by use of social media, April 2015
More interest in vegetables than fruit
Parents of young children lean towards veggies and meat
Figure 28: Attitudes about eating healthy in restaurants, by age, April 2015
Figure 29: Attitudes about eating healthy in restaurants, by age of children in household, April 2015
Hispanics engage in more healthy eating behaviors
But they need more information about what eating healthy means
Figure 30: Changes in eating behaviors at restaurants, More, by Hispanic origin, April 2015
Figure 31: Behaviors associated with beverages in restaurants, by Hispanic origin, April 2015
Profiles of consumers paying more for healthy foods
Healthy-minded parents focused on fresh are a good target
Four consumer groups willing to pay more for healthier foods
Figure 32: Changes in Restaurant Eating Behaviors – CHAID – Tree output, April 2015
Figure 33: Changes in restaurant eating behavior– CHAID – Table output, April 2015
Menu analysis – Healthy dining trends
Key points
Leading preparations include healthy-positioned methods
Figure 34: Leading preparations of ingredients on menus, Q1 2012-Q1 2015
Vegetarian and gluten-free menus increase
Menu claims focus on lighter fare and minimally processed foods
Figure 35: Leading types of menus at restaurants, Q1 2012-Q1 2015
Most menu items don’t have claims, a missed opportunity to convey information to consumers
Use menu to inform consumers with detailed information
Figure 36: Leading ingredients claims on restaurant menus, Q1 2012-15
Figure 37: Specified menu item claims, Q1 2012-Q1 2015
APPENDIX
Data sources, CHAID methodology, and abbreviations
Data sources
CHAID analysis methodology
Abbreviations and Terms
Appendix – Market
Figure 38: US median household income, in inflation-adjusted dollars, 2003-13
Figure 39: Median household income of families with children, in inflation-adjusted dollars, 2003-13
Appendix – Consumers
Figure 40: Median household income, by age of householder, 2013
Figure 41: Median household income, by type of household, 2013
Figure 42: Percent of people aged 20 or older who are obese, by gender and age, and obesity grade, 2009-12
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
US Research Methodology
Consumer research
Social Media Research
Trade research
Statistical Forecasting

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