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The Protein Report: Meat Alternatives - US - January 2015

The Protein Report: Meat Alternatives - US - January 2015

This report looks at the following areas:

  • Health should drive sales of meat alternatives
  • True meatless options fail to resonate with consumers
  • An alternative to substituting for meat?
Egg sales have shown notable growth within the past two years, but other segments of the meat alternative category have not fared nearly as well and endured two years of stagnant sales.

A sizable portion of meat alternative consumers regard the products as overly processed (45% of meat alternative consumers share that opinion) or too high in sodium (42%), and more than six in 10 (61%) agree that it is worth it to pay more for products that they think are good for their health. The meat alternative market can embrace its role as a true alternative to meat by delivering options that are not necessarily intended to mimic meat but to stand in their own right and do so with alternatives that meet consumers’ nutrition demands.


SCOPE AND THEMES
What you need to know
Definition
Data sources
Sales data
Consumer survey data
Advertising creative
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations
Terms
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Eggs dominate the meat alternative category
Figure 1: Sales* of protein alternatives, by segment, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-14, in $ millions
Eggs are consumed almost universally; other meat alternatives are significantly less so
Figure 2: Frequency of eating eggs, by generations, October 2014
Frozen meat alternatives led by burger and poultry options
Figure 3: Sales* of frozen meat alternatives, by category, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-14
Heart health leads reasons for limiting meat consumption
Figure 4: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, by region, October 2014
Meat alternatives not necessarily perceived as healthier
Figure 5: Opinions about meat alternatives – any agree, by generations, October 2014
Weight concerns factor more prominently among Millennials, cholesterol among older
generations
Figure 6: Health reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by generations, October 2014
Meat alternatives regarded as part of a healthy meal
Figure 7: Usage of meat alternatives, by region, October 2014
Millennials bored with meat alternatives available
Figure 8: Opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree, by generations, October 2014
What we think
ISSUES AND INSIGHTS
Health should drive sales of meat alternatives
Issues
Insights
True meatless options fail to resonate with consumers
Issues
Insights
An alternative to substituting for meat?
Issues
Insight
TREND APPLICATIONS
Trend: Prove It
Trend: Guiding Choice
Trend: Fauxthenticity
MARKET/SEGMENT SIZE
Key points
Total meat alternative category sales grow 10% in two years
Figure 9: Sales* of meat alternatives, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-14
Eggs dominate meat alternative category, the only segment posting sizable growth in the last two
years
Figure 10: Sales* of protein alternatives, by segment, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-14
Egg sales grow 18% in the last two years
Figure 11: Sales* of eggs and liquid eggs/egg substitutes, by category, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-
14
Shelf-stable beans register strongest growth since 2012 but still far short of frozen
edamame/soybeans
Figure 12: Sales* of beans, by category, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-14
Burgers, poultry dominate frozen meat alternatives
Figure 13: Sales* of frozen meat alternatives, by category, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-14
Sales declines permeate refrigerated meat alternatives
Figure 14: Sales* of refrigerated meat alternatives, by category, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-14
Seitan sales grow 26% since 2012
Figure 15: Sales* of tofu, tempeh, and seitan, by category, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-14
MARKET DRIVERS
Millennials most likely to consume meat alternatives
Figure 16: US population, by generation share, 2014
Hispanic population growth could lead to category growth
Figure 17: US population by race and Hispanic origin, 2009-19
COMPETITIVE CONTEXT
Fresh, unprocessed products could usurp processed meat alternatives
Cues from meaty competition
Figure 18: Meat, fish, poultry (fresh/frozen) consumption, Summer 2014
Figure 19: Changing behavior: eating more, less, or the same, November 2014
One in five say poultry healthier than plant-based protein sources
Figure 20: Reasons for buying poultry – Any rank, by poultry purchase, August 2014
LEADING COMPANIES AND MARKETING STRATEGIES
Key points
Meat alternative brands in a crowded field where few stand out from the pack
Figure 21: Household volume usage of meat alternatives, by gender, by brand
Boca
Amy’s Kitchen
Figure 22: Amy’s Kitchen, “Why we love family farmers,” TV Commercial, December 2014
MorningStar Farms
Figure 23: MorningStar Farms, “When you want feeling good to feel simple,” YouTube video, October 2014
Private labels lead the pack in egg sales
Figure 24: Household usage of eggs, by race/Hispanic origin, by brand
Eggland’s Best
Figure 25: Eggland’s Best series of videos on cooking eggs: “How to make an omelet,” YouTube video, October
2014
Figure 26: Eggland’s Best series of videos on cooking eggs: “How to poach an egg,” YouTube video, October
2014
Figure 27: Eggland’s Best series of videos on cooking eggs: “Classic quiche Lorraine,” YouTube video, October
2014
INNOVATIONS AND INNOVATORS
Convenience, allergens spur more meatless launches
Figure 28: Claims appearing on meat alternative launches in the US, by product claim, 2010-14
Figure 29: Meat alternative launches in the US, by allergen presence, 2010-14
Allergen-free launches gain strength in meat alternatives
Ethnic flavors inspire meatless launches
Eggs promote protein content, healthier chicken attributes
THE CONSUMER – MEAT ALTERNATIVE CONSUMPTION
Key points
Eggs used by nearly all consumers; burgers lead meatless options
Figure 30: Frequency of eating meat alternatives, October 2014
Figure 31: Frequency of eating meat alternatives, October 2014
More than half of all consumers eat eggs at least a few times a week
Figure 32: Frequency of eating meat alternatives, by generations, October 2014
Millennials consume most meat alternatives
Figure 33: Frequency of eating meat alternatives, by generations, October 2014
THE CONSUMER – REASONS FOR LIMITING MEAT
Key points
Consumers reducing meat consumption for heart health
Figure 34: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, by generations, October 2014
Heart health leads to meat limitations in Northeast and South
Figure 35: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, by region, October 2014
Price factors prominently in households with children
Figure 36: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, by presence of children in household, October 2014
THE CONSUMER – REASONS FOR EATING MEAT ALTERNATIVES
Key points
Saturated fat concerns compel one in five users of meat alternatives
Figure 37: Health reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by gender, October 2014
Figure 38: Health reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by gender, October 2014
Protein from other sources factors most heavily in consumers also avoiding eggs
Figure 39: Reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by gender, October 2014
Figure 40: Reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by gender, October 2014
Weight, cholesterol, saturated fat lead health reasons for consuming meat alternatives
Figure 41: Health reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by generations, October 2014
Cholesterol issues strongly impact meat alternative consumers who exclude eggs
Figure 42: Health reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by generations, October 2014
THE CONSUMER – USE OF MEAT ALTERNATIVES
Key points
Just over a third serve meat alternatives as a main entrée
Figure 43: Usage of meat alternatives, by generations, October 2014
Meatless burgers, poultry serve as a main entrée for only a quarter of respondents
Figure 44: Frequency of eating meat alternatives – High-frequency consumption, by usage of meat alternatives,
October 2014
Excluding egg consumers, meatless poultry leads consumer usage
Figure 45: Frequency of eating meat alternatives – High-frequency consumption, by usage of meat alternatives,
excluding eggs, October 2014
Main entrée tops the meal usage of meat alternatives
Figure 46: Usage of meat alternatives, by region, October 2014
THE CONSUMER – OPINIONS OF MEAT ALTERNATIVES
Key points
Four in 10 say meat alternatives do not taste like real meat
Figure 47: Opinions about meat alternatives, October 2014
Cooking instructions guide meat alternative consumers
Figure 48: Opinions about meat alternatives, October 2014
Millennials much more likely to be bored with current options, say they all taste the same
Figure 49: Opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree, by generations, October 2014
RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN
Key points
Some 59% of consumers – and 72% of Hispanics – eat a meat alternative (including eggs) at least a
few times a week
Figure 50: Frequency of eating meat alternatives, by race/Hispanic origin, October 2014
Almost half of Hispanics consume tofu
Figure 51: Frequency of eating meat alternatives – tofu, tempeh, seitan, by race/Hispanic origin, October 2014 ... 64
More than 90% of all consumers eat eggs
Figure 52: Frequency of eating meat alternatives – eggs/egg substitutes, by race/Hispanic origin,
October 2014
Hispanic consumers of meat alternatives watching cholesterol, attempting to lose weight
Figure 53: Reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by race/Hispanic origin, October 2014
Hispanics more likely to use meat alternatives in a side dish
Figure 54: Usage of meat alternatives, by race/Hispanic origin, October 2014
More than a third of Hispanics say they are bored with the selection of meat alternatives
Figure 55: Opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree, by race/Hispanic origin, October 2014
APPENDIX – OTHER USEFUL CONSUMER TABLES
Figure 56: Sales* of eggs, by free-range status, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-14
Figure 57: Sales* of shelf-stable beans, by type, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-14
Figure 58: Sales* of dried beans, by type, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-14
Figure 59: Sales* of frozen meatless poultry, by category, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-14
Figure 60: Sales* of frozen meatless breakfast alternatives, by category, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks
2012-14
Figure 61: Sales* of frozen meatless dogs, by category, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-14
Figure 62: Sales* of "other" refrigerated meat alternatives, by category, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-
14
Figure 63: Sales* of meat alternative dishes/entrées, by category, at current prices, rolling 52 weeks 2012-14
Types of diets
Figure 64: Diets consumers are following, by gender, October 2014
Figure 65: Diets consumers are following, by region, October 2014
Figure 66: Diets consumers are following, by area, October 2014
Figure 67: Diets consumers are following, by household income, October 2014
Figure 68: Diets consumers are following, by presence of children in household, October 2014
Consuming meat alternatives
Figure 69: Frequency of eating meat alternatives, by gender, October 2014
Figure 70: Frequency of eating meat alternatives, by region, October 2014
Figure 71: Frequency of eating meat alternatives, by area, October 2014
Figure 72: Frequency of eating meat alternatives, by household income, October 2014
Figure 73: Frequency of eating meat alternatives, by presence of children in household, October 2014
Reasons for limiting meat consumption
Figure 74: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, October 2014
Figure 75: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, by gender, October 2014
Figure 76: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, by area, October 2014
Figure 77: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, by household income, October 2014
Figure 78: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, by presence of children in household, October 2014
Figure 79: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, by gender, October 2014
Figure 80: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, by generations, October 2014
Figure 81: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, by region, October 2014
Figure 82: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, by household income, October 2014
Reasons for consuming meat alternatives
Figure 83: Health reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by gender, October 2014
Figure 84: Reasons for parents’ consuming meat alternatives, by gender, October 2014
Figure 85: Reasons for parents’ using meat alternatives, by generations, October 2014
Figure 86: Reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by generations, October 2014
Figure 87: Reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by generations, October 2014
Figure 88: Health reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by area, October 2014
Figure 89: Health reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by area, October 2014
Figure 90: Reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by area, October 2014
Figure 91: Reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by area, October 2014
Figure 92: Reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by area, October 2014
Figure 93: Health reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by household income, October 2014
Figure 94: Reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by household income, October 2014
Figure 95: Health reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by presence of children in household,
October 2014
Figure 96: Reasons for consuming meat alternatives, by presence of children in household, October 2014
Figure 97: Frequency of eating meat alternatives – High-frequency consumption, by reasons for consuming
meat alternatives, October 2014
Figure 98: Frequency of eating meat alternatives – High-frequency consumption, by reasons for consuming
meat alternatives, October 2014
Figure 99: Frequency of eating meat alternatives – High-frequency consumption, by health reasons for
consuming meat alternatives, October 2014
Figure 100: Frequency of eating meat alternatives – High-frequency consumption, by reasons for consuming
meat alternatives, October 2014
How meat alternatives are used
Figure 101: Usage of meat alternatives, by gender, October 2014
Figure 102: Usage of meat alternatives, by gender, October 2014 (continued)
Figure 103: Usage of meat alternatives, by generations, October 2014
Figure 104: Usage of meat alternatives, by region, October 2014
Figure 105: Usage of meat alternatives, by household income, October 2014
Figure 106: Usage of meat alternatives, by presence of children in household, October 2014
Figure 107: Usage of meat alternatives, by presence of children in household, October 2014 (continued)
Opinions about meat alternatives
Figure 108: Opinions about meat alternatives, October 2014
Figure 109: Opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree, by gender, October 2014
Figure 110: Opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree, by gender, October 2014 (continued)
Figure 111: Opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree, by gender, October 2014 (continued)
Figure 112: Opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree, by generations, October 2014
Figure 113: Opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree, by generations, October 2014 (continued)
Figure 114: Opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree, by generations, October 2014 (continued)
Figure 115: Opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree, by region, October 2014
Figure 116: Opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree, by area, October 2014
Figure 117: Opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree, by household income, October 2014
Figure 118: Opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree, by presence of children in household,
October 2014
Figure 119: Diets consumers are following, by opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree –
Flavor/format/delivery, October 2014
Figure 120: Diets consumers are following, by opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree – Familiarity,
October 2014
Figure 121: Diets consumers are following, by opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree – Health,
October 2014
Figure 122: Diets consumers are following, by opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree – Price,
October 2014
Reasons consumers do not eat meat alternatives
Figure 123: Reasons for not eating meat alternatives, October 2014
Dishes for proteins
Figure 124: Meal items in which meats/meat alternatives would be used, October 2014
Figure 125: Meal items in which meats/meat alternatives would be used, October 2014 (continued)
Figure 126: Meal items in which meats/meat alternatives would be used, by gender, October 2014
Figure 127: Meal items in which meats/meat alternatives would be used, by generations, October 2014
Figure 128: Meal items in which meats/meat alternatives would be used, by area, October 2014
Race/Hispanic origin
Figure 129: Diets consumers are following, by race/Hispanic origin, October 2014
Figure 130: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, by race/Hispanic origin, October 2014
Figure 131: Reasons for limiting meat consumption, by race/Hispanic origin, October 2014 (continued)
Figure 132: Usage of meat alternatives, by race/Hispanic origin, October 2014
Figure 133: Opinions about meat alternatives – Any agree, by race/Hispanic origin, October 2014
Figure 134: Meal items in which meats/meat alternatives would be used, by race/Hispanic origin,
October 2014
APPENDIX – TRADE ASSOCIATIONS
American Frozen Food Institute (AFFI)
American Soybean Association (ASA)
Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA)
National Frozen & Refrigerated Food Association (NFRA)
Organic Trade Association (OTA)
United Soybean Board (USB)
US METHODOLOGY
CONSUMER RESEARCH
Primary Data Analysis
Secondary Data Analysis
Qualitative Research
Further Analysis
Social Media Research
TRADE RESEARCH
STATISTICAL FORECASTING

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