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Leisure Time - US - August 2015

Leisure Time - US - August 2015

Leisure expenditures are expected to grow at nearly the same rate as overall US expenditures through 2020 as confidence remains high and as consumers become more experience oriented; however, several demographic and lifestyle shifts are expected to alter perceptions of leisure time and change consumer behavior. As the traditional 9-5 work schedule becomes less standard, companies should expect consumers to seek out quick tastes of leisure that fit their erratic schedules. This is especially true for women, who still spend more time than men on chores and childcare. Activities that help these consumers to unwind while balancing their need to work toward life goals should do well with these consumers, as should activities that are highly social or require a great deal of interconnectivity.

This report looks at the following areas:

Barriers to leisure remain in place, especially for women
A lack of time results in a lack of out-of-home participation
Career, family take up hours of free time for Millennials, Gen Xers
Millennials, iGens cut the cord


OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Definition
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The issues
Figure 1: Barriers to leisure activities, by gender, May 2015
Figure 2: Out-of-home leisure activities – Monthly – And mean number of hours available on weekdays, by gender, May 2015
Figure 3: Entertainment subscriptions, by generation, May 2015
The opportunities
Figure 4: Top five out-of-home leisure activities – Monthly, May 2015
Figure 5: Leisure activities – Monthly, Millennials versus all, May 2015
Figure 6: Attitudes toward the purpose of leisure, May 2015
What it means
THE MARKET
What you need to know
Leisure expenditures expected to continue growth trend
Improving economy leads to increased confidence, more discretionary purchases
Changing demographics, lifestyles to affect leisure market
The definition of leisure may be changing
Market size and forecast
Leisure expenditure growth projected to taper slightly, moderate gains still expected
Figure 7: Total US consumer leisure* expenditures and fan chart forecast, at current prices, 2010-20
Figure 8: Total US consumer leisure* expenditures and forecast, at current prices, 2010-20
Market breakdown
Recreational services account for majority of leisure spending
Figure 9: Share of total US consumer leisure* expenditures, by segment, at current prices, 2013 and 2015
Figure 10: US expenditures and fan chart forecast of recreational goods, at current prices, 2010-20
Figure 11: US expenditures and fan chart forecast of recreational services, at current prices, 2010-20
Market factors
Consumer confidence rises as unemployment falls
Figure 12: Consumer confidence and unemployment, by month, April 2010-April 2015
Aging population leads to decreased labor force participation
Figure 13: Americans aged 65+, total population and share of population, 2015-60
Figure 14: Labor force participation, by month, June 2010-June 2015
More Americans living alone
Figure 15: Share of households by number of persons per household, 1960-2013
Technology blurs lines between work and play
KEY PLAYERS
What you need to know
Once booming leisure activities now struggle
Ancillary offerings, seamless payment help drive profits
Organizations capitalize on nostalgia, education
Leisure comes to consumers, instead of the other way around
What’s working?
Ancillary products drive profits
Adults release their inner child
Online classes help users to improve skills, try new hobbies, get fit
LGBT ads hit their target
Figure 16: Amazon, “Kindle Paperwhite: Perfect at the Beach,” February 2013
Figure 17: Spotify, “Can’t Find the Words?” April 2014
Figure 18: DirecTV, “Rivalry – DIRECTV NFL SUNDAY TICKET TV Spot,” September 2014
What’s facing challenges?
Classics struggle to attract young, diverse consumers
Expensive, time-consuming athletic activities lose out to alternatives
What’s next?
Bite-sized entertainment
Bringing the fun to consumers
Seamless payment
THE CONSUMER
What you need to know
All work and no play? Not so true
Streaming solo: Video entertainment, television remain popular
Nature, nutrition draw consumers out of home
Younger consumers recharge then take charge
Perceived amount of leisure time
Consumers average more than four hours of leisure each day
Figure 19: Amount of perceived leisure time, weekday and weekend, May 2015
Women still spend more time on housework
Figure 20: Amount of perceived leisure time, weekday, by gender, May 2015
Generation X and Millennials report the least amount of leisure time
Figure 21: Mean amount of perceived leisure time, weekday and weekend, by generation, May 2015
Leisure time companions
Most leisure time spent alone or with immediate family
Figure 22: Leisure time companions, by weekday and weekend, May 2015
In-home video and entertainment
Netflix is nearly as popular as cable/satellite
Figure 23: TV/Video subscriptions, May 2015
Figure 24: Entertainment subscriptions, by generation, May 2015
Smart TVs becoming established; wireless streaming devices poised for growth
Figure 25: Frequency of using in-home media devices used to watch streaming shows and movies, May 2015
Figure 26: In-home media devices used to watch shows and movies, by generation, May 2015
Out-of-home leisure activities
Dining out tops the list of leisure activities
Figure 27: Out-of-home Leisure activities – Monthly, May 2015
Men participate in more leisure activities outside of the home
Figure 28: Out-of-home leisure activities – Monthly, by gender, May 2015
Millennial generation more active than others
Figure 29: Leisure activities – Monthly, by generation, May 2015
Asians more involved in enrichment activities
Figure 30: Enrichment leisure activities – Monthly, by race, May 2015
Aspirational activities
Family, friends, fitness are top of mind
Figure 31: Aspirational leisure activities, May 2015
Women aspire toward betterment
Figure 32: Aspirational leisure activities, by gender, May 2015
Leisure time barriers
Household responsibilities are obstacles to women’s leisure
Figure 33: How time is spent in an average day, leisure time on weekends and holidays, by gender, 2014
Working, commuting are barriers to leisure
Figure 34: Barriers to leisure activities, by gender, May 2015
Barriers to leisure vary by generation
Figure 35: Barriers to leisure activities, by generation, May 2015
Attitudes toward leisure time
Consumers seek to balance leisure time activities
Figure 36: Attitudes toward the purpose of leisure, by generation, May 2015
Figure 37: Attitudes toward leisure and socialization, by generation, May 2015
Millennials and iGens: Social both online and offline
Women more concerned than men with leisure activity pricing
Figure 38: Attitudes toward the cost of leisure activities, by gender, May 2015
LGBTs and leisure time
Sexual orientation impacts who people spend their time with
Figure 39: Companions for leisure – Weekday and weekends, LGBT versus heterosexual, May 2015
LGBT consumers more likely to go to bars, museums
Figure 40: Select out-of-home leisure activities – Monthly, by LGBT and Heterosexual, May 2015
Figure 41: Select out-of-home leisure activities – Monthly, by gay/bisexual men and heterosexual men, May 2015
LGBT viewers subscribe to more content, use more devices
Figure 42: TV/Video subscriptions, by LGBT and heterosexual, May 2015
Figure 43: In-home media devices used to watch streaming shows and movies, by LGBT and heterosexual, May 2015
Many LGBT aspire to spend more time at bars, live events
Figure 44: Select aspirational leisure activities, by LGBT and Heterosexual, May 2015
Heterosexuals want activities to align with values; LGBT want to learn
Figure 45: Select attitudes toward leisure and socialization, by LGBT and Heterosexual, May 2015
APPENDIX
Data sources and abbreviations
Data sources
Fan chart forecast
Abbreviations and terms
Appendix – Market
Figure 46: Total US consumer leisure* expenditures and forecast, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2010-20
Figure 47: Total US consumer leisure* expenditures, by segment, at current prices, 2013 and 2015
Figure 48: US expenditures and forecast of recreational goods, at current prices, 2010-20
Figure 49: US expenditures and forecast of recreational goods, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2010-20
Figure 50: US expenditures and forecast of recreational services, at current prices, 2010-20
Figure 51: US expenditures and forecast of recreational services, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2010-20
figure 52: Total US share of households by number of persons per household, 1960-2013
Figure 53: Total US population distribution and forecast, by age, 2015-60
Figure 54: Labor force participation, by month, June 2010-June 2015
Figure 55: Consumer confidence and unemployment, by month, April 2010-April 2015
Appendix – Consumer
Figure 56: Past 12 month leisure activities, by gender, February 2015-March 2015
Figure 57: Time spent in primary activities, averages per day, by gender, 2014
Figure 58: Time spent in leisure and sports activities on weekends and holidays, by gender, 2014
Appendix – LGBT social media
Methodology
Key findings
Figure 59: LGBT online discussion of social issues and sentiment, June 15, 2014- Dec. 15, 2014
Discrimination
Figure 60: LGBT online discussion of social issues and sentiment, by gender, June 15, 2014- Dec. 15, 2014
Figure 61: LGBT selected discrimination discussions, June 15, 2014-Dec. 15-2014
Transgender rights
Figure 62: LGBT selected transgender discussions, June 15, 2014-Dec. 15-2014
Homelessness
Figure 63: LGBT selected homelessness discussions, June 15, 2014-Dec. 15-2014
Appendix – Qualitative research
Question: Ideal day
Question: How free time is spent
Question: Gathering with others
Question: Interest in activities
Question: Companies and LGBT issues
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
US Research Methodology
Consumer research
Social Media Research
Trade research
Statistical Forecasting

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