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Spices and Seasonings

This Specialists in Business Information market profile provides readers with data on peppers and other spices, dehydrated garlic and onions, table salt and salt substitutes, and seasoning mixes. The report follows the distribution of spice and seasoning materials from U.S. production and importation, to processing and packaging, and shipments to retail, commercial, and foodservice channels. Retail purchaser demographics are provided as well. U.S. import data is provided for 59 spice and seasoning materials. Data and information on retail brand shares, leading brand customer profiles, new products, and major supplier profiles are included to develop a base of competitor intelligence.


Section 1: U.S. Spice and Seasoning Supply and Consumption Trends

    Executive Summary
    Spice and Seasoning Material Supply
    Per Capita Spice and Salt Consumption
    Important and Growing Spice and Seasoning Products Growing Seasoning Mix Demand
    Increased Reliance on Food Processor/Foodservice Markets Shifting Retail Distribution Channels
    Expanded Foreign Sales Effort
    Outlook
    • Table 1-1 U.S. Spice and Seasoning Material Supply: 1977-2003 (pounds)
    • Figure 1-1 U.S. Spice and Seasoning Material Supply: 1988, 1993, 1998, 2003 (pounds)
    • Table 1-2 U.S. Volume Growth for the Spice and Seasoning Material Supply and Total Food and Beverage Industry Production: 1977-1998 (index)
    • Table 1-3 Distribution of U.S. Spice and Seasoning Material Supply by Origin of Material: 1977-2003 (percent): Imports and U.S. Production
    • Table 1-4 U.S. Mustard Seed and Dried Chile Pepper Production: 1972-1997 (pounds)
    • Table 1-5 Top Twelve Spice and Seasoning Materials by Quantity Imported and Growth of Imports: 1998 (pounds and percent): Material, Quantity Imported or Growth, Top Country of Origin, and Use
    • Table 1-6 Distribution of the U.S. Spice and Seasoning Material Supply by End-Use Market: 1992 and 1998 (pounds): Food Processors/Foodservice, Households, and Exports Figure 1-2 Distribution of the U.S. Spice and Seasoning Material Supply by End-Use Market: 1992 and 1998 (total supply): Food Processors/Foodservice, Households, and Exports
    • Table 1-7 U.S. Spice and Seasoning Material Consumption: 1977-2003 (pounds): Total Consumption, Growth Analysis, and per Capita Consumption
    • Table 1-8 U.S. Food Grade Salt Sales: 1982-2003 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 1-9 U.S. per Capita Salt, Spice, and Seasoning Material Consumption: 1982-2003 (pounds)
    • Figure 1-3 U.S. per Capita Salt, Spice, and Seasoning Material Consumption: 1988-1998 (pounds)
    • Table 1-10 U.S. Average Monthly New York Spot Prices for 39 Spices: 1990-1998 (dollars)
    Scope and Methodology

Section 2: U.S. Spice and Seasoning Material Imports

    Introduction and Methodology
    U.S. Import Trends and Share of U.S. Consumption
    Import Costs and Charges
    Important Imported Product Lines
    Strongest Growing Imported Products
    Major Supplying Countries
    • Table 2-1 U.S. Spice and Seasoning Imports: 1989-1998 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 2-2 Total U.S. Spice and Seasoning Import Costs: 1995-1998 (dollars): Product Cost, Insurance and Freight Costs, and Tariff
    • Table 2-3 Value of U.S. Spice and Seasoning Material Imports for Fifty-Nine Products: 1992-1998 (dollars)
    • Table 2-4 Quantity U.S. Spice and Seasoning Material Imports for Fifty-Nine Products: 1992-1998 (pounds)
    • Table 2-5 U.S. Average Value per Pound of Spice and Seasoning Material Imported for Fifty-Seven Products: 1992-1998 (dollars)
    • Table 2-6 Value of U.S. Spice and Seasoning Imports for the Top Twenty-Five Countries of Origin: 1995-1998 (dollars)
    • Table 2-7 Quantity U.S. Spice and Seasoning Imports for the Top Twenty-Five Countries of Origin and Average Value per Pound Imported: 1995-1998 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 2-8 U.S. Imports of Black Pepper for the Top Six Countries of Origin: 1992-1998 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 2-9 U.S. Imports of White Pepper for the Top Seven Countries of Origin: 1992-1998 (pounds and dollars) Table 2-10 U.S. Imports of Paprika for the Top Seven Countries of Origin: 1992-1998 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 2-11 U.S. Imports of Vanilla Beans for the Top Six Countries of Origin: 1992-1998 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 2-12 U.S. Imports of Cinnamon and Cinnamon-Tree Flowers, Neither Crushed Nor Ground, for the Top Three Countries of Origin: 1992-1998 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 2-13 U.S. Imports of Sesame Seeds for the Top Ten Countries of Origin: 1992-1998 (pounds and dollars) Table 2-14 U.S. Mustard Seed Imports From Canada: 1992-1998 (pounds and dollars)

Section 3: U.S. Spice and Seasoning Packager Shipments

    Introduction and Methodology
    Spice Processor and Packager Shipments
    Consumer Sized Package Shipments
    Commercial Sized Package Shipments
    Pepper Product Shipments
    Cost Structure and Profitability of U.S. Spice Processing and Packaging Plants
    Dehydrated Onion and Dehydrated Vegetable Shipments Seasoning Mix Shipments
    New Product Activity
    • Table 3-1 Value of U.S. Spice Processor and Packager Shipments: 1972-2003 (dollars)
    • Table 3-2 Quantity U.S. Spice Processor and Packager Shipments and Average Value per Pound Shipped: 1972-2003 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 3-3 U.S. Shipments of Consumer Sized Packaged Processed Spice: 1972-2003 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 3-4 U.S. Shipments of Commercial Sized Packaged Processed Spice: 1972-2003 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 3-5 U.S. Black and White Packaged Processed Pepper Shipments by Package Size: 1977-1998 (pounds and dollars): Total Shipments, Consumer Sizes, and Commercial Sizes
    • Table 3-6 U.S. Producer Price Trends for Packaged Processed Spices: 1986-1998 (index): Total, Pepper and Other Spices, and Consumer and Commercial Sized Packages
    • Table 3-7 Cost Structure of U.S. Packaged Processed Spice Plants: 1987-1997 (number and dollars): Number of Plants, Plants Shipments, Payroll and Material Costs Percent Shipments, Shipments per Employee, Production Worker Average Wages and Average Weekly Hours, and Capital Expenditures
    • Table 3-8 Number and Average Shipments of U.S. Spice Processors and Packagers by Type and Package Size: 1977-1998 (number and dollars)
    • Table 3-9 U.S. Dehydrated Onion Shipments and Number of Packagers: 1972-2003 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 3-10 U.S. Shipments of Other Dried and Dehydrated Vegetables and Number of Packagers: 1972-2003 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 3-11 U.S. Shipments of Dry Seasoning Mixes: 1982-2003 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 3-12 U.S. Producer Price Trends for Seasoning Mixes: 1992-1998 (index)
    • Table 3-13 Raw Spice Materials Purchased by U.S. Spice Processors and Packagers and Suppliers of Seasoning Mixes: 1992-1998
    • Table 3-14 New U.S. Spice, Extract, and Seasoning Product Introductions and New Stock Keeping Units: 1991-1997 (number)
    • Table 3-15 Selected New Product Introductions: 1997-1998
    • Table 3-16 Mccormick and Company Food Products Sales and Profit Margins and Food Product Sales by Market and World Area: 1995-1998 (dollars and percent)
    • Table 3-17 Sales and Profit Trends for Morton International's Salt Business: 1995-1998 (dollars and percent)

Section 4: Profiles and Recent Developments of Major U.S. Spice and Seasoning Processors and Packagers

    Sources, Methodology, and Objectives
    Alberto-Culver Co.
      Seasoning Products and Sales
      Consumer Profile
    Goya Foods, Inc.
      Seasoning Products and Sales
    Lawry's Foods, Inc
      Products and Sales
      Consumer Profile
    McCormick & Co., Inc.
      Food Products and Sales
      Source of Raw Materials
      Markets and Facilities
      World Market Sales Trends
      U.S. Retail Sales and Market Share
      New Pricing Strategy to Boost Retail Sales
      Customer Profile
      Strengthens Seasoning Mix Line
    Morton International, Inc.
      Salt Business Segment
      Sales and Profit Trends
      Progress at Salins Du Midi
      U.S. Retail Sales and Market Share
      Morton Lite Customer Profile
    Tone Brothers, Inc.
      Restructuring North American Business
      Retail Sales and Market Share
      Customer Profile
    Universal Foods Corp.
      Rogers Foods Subsidiary
      Universal Dehydrates Subsidiary
      Dehydrated Products Sales

Section 5: U.S. Household Spice and Seasoning Spending and Consumer Demographics

    Introduction and Methodology
    Total Household Spending on Salt, Spices, and Seasonings Important Demographic Purchasing Groups
    Consumer Profile of Major Spice and Seasoning Brands Consumer Profile of Major Salt Substitute Brands
    • Table 5-1 U.S. Household Spending on Salt, Spices, and Other Seasonings: 1984-1998 (dollars)
    • Table 5-2 U.S. Household Spending on Salt, Spices, and Other Seasonings by Demographic Characteristic: 1985-1996 (dollars): Income, Age, Size, and Region
    • Table 5-3 Distribution of U.S. Household Salt, Spice, and Other Seasoning Spending by Demographic Characteristic: 1985-1996 (percent): Income, Age, Size, and Region
    • Table 5-4 Average Annual U.S. Household Spending on Salt, Spices, and Other Seasonings by Demographic Characteristic: 1985-1996 (dollars): Income, Age, Size, and Region
    • Table 5-5 Distribution of U.S. Households Purchasing Spices and Seasonings by Demographic Characteristic and by Select Brand, Spring: 1998 (percent): Total Households, Mccormick, Lawry's, and Durkee; Sex, Age, Income, Race, Household Size, and Region
    • Table 5-6 U.S. Index of Likelihood to Purchase Spices and Seasonings by Demographic Characteristic and by Select Brand, Spring: 1998: Total Households, McCormick, Lawry's, and Durkee; Sex, Age, Income, Race, Household Size, and Region
    • Table 5-7 Distribution of U.S. Households Purchasing Salt Substitutes by Demographic Characteristic and by Select Brand, Spring: 1998 (percent): Total Households, Mrs. Dash, Morton Lite, Salt Sense, No Salt, and Lawry's Salt Free; Sex, Age, Income, Race, Household Size, and Region
    • Table 5-8 U.S. Index of Likelihood to Purchase Salt Substitutes by Demographic Characteristic and by Select Brand, Spring: 1998 (index): Total Households, Mrs. Dash, Morton Lite, Salt Sense, No Salt, and Lawry's Salt Free; Sex, Age, Race, Income, Household Size, and Region
    • Table 5-9 Distribution of U.S. Households by Demographic Characteristic: 1975-1997 (number and percent): Household Income, Household Size, Age of Household Head, Region, and Total Households
    • Table 5-10 U.S. Population of Hispanic Origin: 1980-2005 (number): Total Hispanic Population and Percent Total U.S. Population
    • Table 5-11 Hispanic Origin Population by State Ranked by Size and Share of Total State Population: 1997-2005 (number and percent)

Section 6: U.S. Retail Spice and Seasoning Sales and Brand Market Shares

    Introduction and Methodology
    Retail Sales Trends
    Pricing Situation
    Sales by Distribution Channel
    Leading Marketers and Shares
    Private Label Product Sales
    • Table 6-1 U.S. Spice and Seasoning Retail Sales and by Type of Outlet: 1994-1998 (pounds and dollars): Food Stores, Drug Stores, and Mass Merchandisers
    • Table 6-2 U.S. Retail Salt, Spice, and Other Seasoning Sales by Type of Outlet: 1994-1998 (pounds and dollars): Food Stores, Drug Stores, and Mass Merchandisers
    • Table 6-3 Share of U.S. Retail Salt, Spice, and Seasoning Sales for Top Ten Companies and Private Label: 1994 and 1998 (percent)
    • Table 6-4 U.S. Retail Pepper Sales and by Type of Outlet: 1994-1998 (pounds and dollars): Food Stores, Drug Stores, and Mass Merchandisers
    • Table 6-5 U.S. Retail Pepper Sales and Share for Top Eight Brands and Private Label: 1994-1998 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 6-6 U.S. Retail Salt/Seasoned Salt/Salt Substitute Sales and by Type of Outlet: 1994-1998 (pounds and dollars): Food Stores, Drug Stores, and Mass Merchandisers
    • Table 6-7 U.S. Retail Salt/Seasoned Salt/Salt Substitute Sales for Top Twelve Brands and Private Label: 1994-1998 (volume and dollars)
    • Table 6-8 U.S. Retail Garlic Spread Sales and by Type of Outlet: 1994-1998 (pounds and dollars): Food Stores, Drug Stores, and Mass Merchandisers
    • Table 6-9 U.S. Retail Garlic Spread Sales for Top Seven Brands and Private Label: 1994-1998 (volume and dollars)
    • Table 6-10 U.S. Retail Other Spice/Seasoning Sales and by Type of Outlet: 1994-1998 (quantity and dollars): Food Stores, Drug Stores, and Mass Merchandisers
    • Table 6-11 U.S. Retail Sales of Other Spice Seasonings for Top Sixteen Brands and Private Label: 1994-1998 (volume and dollars)
    • Table 6-12 U.S. Average Value per Pound of Salt, Spice and Seasoning Product Sold for Top Brands: 1994-1998 (dollars)
    • Table 6-13 Mccormick and Company Branded Retail Sales for Fifteen Products: 1994 and 1998 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 6-14 Value of Mccormick and Company Branded Retail Sales for Fifteen Products by Type of U.S. Outlet: 1994 and 1998 (dollars): Food Stores, Drug Stores, and Mass Merchandisers
    • Table 6-15 Quantity Mccormick and Company Branded Retail Sales for Fifteen Products by Type of U.S. Outlet: 1994 and 1998 (pounds)
    • Table 6-16 U.S. Retail Dry Seasoning Mixes by Type of Outlet: 1994-1998 (quantity and dollars): Food Stores, Drug Stores, and Mass Merchandisers
    • Table 6-17 U.S. Retail Dry Seasoning Mix Sales and Share for Twelve Top Brands and Private Label: 1994-1998 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 6-18 U.S. Average Value per Pound of Dry Seasoning Mix Sold for Top Twelve Brands: 1994-1998 (dollars)

Section 7: U.S. Food Processing/Foodservice Markets and Factors Affecting Demand

    Introduction and Methodology
    Spice and Seasoning Purchases
    Salt Purchases
    Major Food Processing Markets
    Rising Use of Spice Oleoresin
    Factors Driving Foodservice Industry Purchases
    • Table 7-1 U.S. Food Processor/Foodservice Spice and Seasoning Material Purchases,1992 and 1998 (pounds)
    • Table 7-2 Salt Purchases by the U.S. Food Processing Industry by End-Use by Salt Type: 1996 and 1997 (pounds): Meat Packers, Dairy, Canning, Baking, Grain Mill Products, and Other Food Processing; Vacuum Pans and Open Pans, Solar, Rock, and Salt in Brine
    • Table 7-3 Purchases of Spice and Curing Materials by Meat Product Plants: 1977-1998 (dollars)
    • Table 7-4 Production Trends for the U.S. Food Industry and Key Food Processor End-Use Markets: 1993-1998 (index): Total Food Industry, Meat Products, Dairy Products, Canned and Frozen Food, Grain Mill Products, Bakery Products, Sugar and Confectionery, and Coffee and Miscellaneous
    • Table 7-5 Number of U.S. Food Product Plants by State for Key End-Use Market Sectors: 1995: Meat Products, Dairy Products, Preserved Fruits and Vegetables, Grain Mill Products, Bakery Products, Sugar and Confectionery Products, Fats and Oils, and Miscellaneous Processed Foods
    • Table 7-6 Foodservice Industry's Position in Total U.S. Food Spending: 1972-1998 (dollars): Total U.S. Food Spending, Food for Off Premise Use, and Meals and Snacks
    • Table 7-7 Consumer Price Trends for Food at-Home and Food Away-From-Home: 1982-1998 (index)
    • Table 7-8 U.S. Female Labor Participation Rate: 1977-1998
    • Table 7-9 U.S. Foodservice Sales by Type of Outlet: 1985-1998 (dollars): Restaurants, Fast-Food Outlets, Cafeterias, Caterers, Hotels and Motels, Retailers, Amusement Places, Drinking Places, Schools, Military, Plants and Office Buildings, Medical Facilities, Transportation Services, and Others
    • Table 7-10 Percent Distribution of U.S. Foodservice Sales by Type of Outlet: 1985-1998 (percent): Restaurants, Fast-Food Outlets, Cafeterias, Caterers, Hotels and Motels, Retailers, Amusement Places, Drinking Places, Schools, Military, Plants and Office Buildings, Medical Facilities, Transportation Services, and Others
    • Table 7-11 U.S. Eating Places by Principal Type of Menu: 1992 and 1997 (number and dollars): Italian, Mexican, Chinese, Other Ethnic, Seafood, Steak, Pizza, Chicken, Hamburger, Sub Shop, American, and Other
    • Table 7-12 U.S. Eating and Drinking Place Sales by Region and State: 1987-1997 (dollars)
    • Table 7-13 Number and Average Revenues for U.S. Eating and Drinking Places by Region and State: 1987-1997 (number and dollars)

Section 8: U.S. Spice and Seasoning Material Exports and Select Foreign Market Data

    Introduction and Methodology
    U.S. Export Trends and Share of the U.S. Supply
    Important and Strong Growing Export Lines
    Major Country Markets
    Competitor Actions to Expand Globally
    Canadian Spice and Seasoning Imports
    World Pepper Supply Situation
    • Table 8-1 U.S. Spice and Seasoning Exports: 1989-1998 (pounds and dollars)
    • Table 8-2 Value of U.S. Spice and Seasoning Material Exports for Thirty-Two Products: 1992-1998 (dollars)
    • Table 8-3 Quantity U.S. Spice and Seasoning Material Exports for Thirty-Two Products: 1992-1998 (pounds)
    • Table 8-4 U.S. Average Value per Pound of Spice and Seasoning Material Exported for Thirty-Two Products: 1992-1998 (dollars)
    • Table 8-5 Value of U.S. Spice and Seasoning Exports for the Top Twenty Countries of Destination: 1995-1998 (dollars)
    • Table 8-6 Quantity U.S. Spice and Seasoning Exports for the Top Twenty Countries of Destination: 1995-1998 (pounds)
    • Table 8-7 Canadian Spice and Seasoning Material Imports: 1992-1997 (Pounds and Canadian Dollars)
    • Table 8-8 Value of Canadian Spice and Seasoning Material Imports for Twenty-Seven Products: 1992-1997 (Canadian dollars)
    • Table 8-9 Quantity Canadian Spice and Seasoning Material Imports for Twenty-Seven Products: 1992-1997 (pounds)
    • Table 8-10 Average Canadian Value per Pound of Imported Spice and Seasoning Material for Twenty-Seven Products: 1992-1997 (Canadian dollars)
    • Table 8-11 Pepper Production for Ten Countries: 1993-1997 (pounds): Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mexico, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam
    • Table 8-12 Pepper Exports for Ten Countries and Share of Domestic Production: 1993-1997 (pounds and percent): Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mexico, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam
    • Table 8-13 Sales of Ten Major Japanese Spice and Seasoning Companies: 1997 (dollars): Company and Address, Sales, and Product Line

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