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Medical & Scientific Library Plans for the Print Materials Collection

Medical & Scientific Library Plans for the Print Materials Collection

The study looks closely at the plans of 25 major medical and other scientific libraries for their print materials collection. Survey participants include Carnegie Mellon University, Colorado State University, the Spanish National Research Council, the Linda Hall Library, the Cleveland Clinic Library, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the University of Bath, Ashland Inc., the Royal College of Nursing, and the Harrell Health Sciences Library of Penn State University, and many others. Data in the report is broken out for medical and other scientific libraries, by type of sponsoring organization and by library size defined by number of librarians.The report covers library acquisition plans in journals, books and eBooks, practices on culling print materials, trends in surveying end users preferences on paper vs, digital information access, preferred rates of change in paper/digital access models, and other issues of interest to academic, corporate and government medical and other scientific librarians. The report helps its end users to answer questions such as: are medical and scientific libraries phasing out paper? If so, in what areas and how quickly? Are certain kinds of scientists more supportive of paper-based access? What is the demand for paper-based journals? How comfortable are patrons with eBook access? Billions of dollars are still being spent on paper-based scientific and medical materials for libraries: what is the future of these expenditures? Just a few of the study’s many findings are that: Spending on ebooks in 2016 by the libraries sampled decreased; The percentage of subscriptions accounted for by joint print and online journal subscriptions in the sample is expected to decrease from 13% in 2017 to 12% in 2018; Only 7% of total subscriptions of medical libraries are accounted for by print only journals, while this figure is 15% in the case of non-medical libraries; and In 2015 hospital libraries in the sample spent a mean of $145,200 on print books.

The study looks closely at the plans of 25 major medical and other scientific libraries for their print materials collection. Survey participants include Carnegie Mellon University, Colorado State University, the Spanish National Research Council, the Linda Hall Library, the Cleveland Clinic Library, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the University of Bath, Ashland Inc., the Royal College of Nursing, and the Harrell Health Sciences Library of Penn State University, and many others. Data in the report is broken out for medical and other scientific libraries, by type of sponsoring organization and by library size defined by number of librarians.The report covers library acquisition plans in journals, books and eBooks, practices on culling print materials, trends in surveying end users preferences on paper vs, digital information access, preferred rates of change in paper/digital access models, and other issues of interest to academic, corporate and government medical and other scientific librarians. The report helps its end users to answer questions such as: are medical and scientific libraries phasing out paper? If so, in what areas and how quickly? Are certain kinds of scientists more supportive of paper-based access? What is the demand for paper-based journals? How comfortable are patrons with eBook access? Billions of dollars are still being spent on paper-based scientific and medical materials for libraries: what is the future of these expenditures? Just a few of the study’s many findings are that: Spending on ebooks in 2016 by the libraries sampled decreased; The percentage of subscriptions accounted for by joint print and online journal subscriptions in the sample is expected to decrease from 13% in 2017 to 12% in 2018; Only 7% of total subscriptions of medical libraries are accounted for by print only journals, while this figure is 15% in the case of non-medical libraries; and In 2015 hospital libraries in the sample spent a mean of $145,200 on print books.


THE QUESTIONNAIRE
PARTICIPANTS LIST
Characteristics of the Sample
SUMMARY OF MAIN FINDINGS
Characteristics of the Sample
Spending on Print Only Journal Subscriptions with No Online Counterparts in 2015
Spending on Print Only Journal Subscriptions with No Online Counterparts in 2016
Anticipated Spending on Print Only Journal Subscriptions with No Online Counterparts in 2017
Percentage of Subscriptions for Print Only Journals
Percentage of Subscriptions for Online Only Journals
Percentage of Subscriptions for Joint Print and Online Journals
Estimated Percentage of Subscriptions for Print Only Journals in 2018
Estimated Percentage of Subscriptions for Online only journals in 2018
Estimated Percentage of Subscriptions for Joint Print and Online Journals in 2018
Philosophy about Future of Print Journals in the Libraries
Spending on Print Books in 2015
Spending on Print Books in 2016
Anticipated Spending on Print Books in 2017
Spending on eBooks in 2015
Spending on eBooks in 2016
Anticipated Spending on eBooks in 2016
Outlook of Print Book Purchases vis. a vis. eBook Alternatives
Role of Inter-library Loan Capabilities and Relations with Consortia in Print Materials Culling Practices
Attitude of Patrons towards Substitution of Print Books with eBooks
Areas in which Print Journals and Book Titles Were Eliminated
Areas in which Libraries Were Reluctant to Shed Print Journal and Book Titles
Perspective on Libraries' Print Materials Collection over Next Five Years
Percentage of Titles in Print Book Collection Culled Each Year
Changes in Book Acquisitions and/or Book Collection Culling Strategy
Reduction of Print Collections and Increase in Space for Other Purposes
Utilization of Freed-up Space
Library Patrons Surveys of Preferences for Print vs. Digital Resources
sage of Print Versions and Digital Versions of Same Resources
Conclusions about Usage of Print Versions and Digital Versions of Same Resources
Prospect of Non-scientific Materials
Access Restored to Print Materials
Table 1.1 If your library is a higher education library is it:
Table 1.2 If your library is a higher education library is it: Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 2 How much did the library spend on print only journal subscriptions with no online counterpart in each of the following years? (In US$)
Table 2.1.1 How much did the library spend on print only journal subscriptions with no online counterpart in 2015? (In US$)
Table 2.1.2 How much did the library spend on print only journal subscriptions with no online counterpart in 2015? (In US$) Broken out by Type of organization
Table 2.1.3 How much did the library spend on print only journal subscriptions with no online counterpart in 2015? (In US$) Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 2.1.4 How much did the library spend on print only journal subscriptions with no online counterpart in 2015? (In US$) Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 2.2.1 How much did the library spend on print only journal subscriptions with no online counterpart in 2016? (In US$)
Table 2.2.2 How much did the library spend on print only journal subscriptions with no online counterpart in 2016? (In US$) Broken out by Type of organization
Table 2.2.3 How much did the library spend on print only journal subscriptions with no online counterpart in 2016? (In US$) Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 2.2.4 How much did the library spend on print only journal subscriptions with no online counterpart in 2016? (In US$) Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 2.3.1 How much will the library spend on print only journal subscriptions with no online counterpart in 2017 (anticipated)? (In US$)
Table 2.3.2 How much will the library spend on print only journal subscriptions with no online counterpart in 2017 (anticipated)? (In US$) Broken out by Type of organization
Table 2.3.3 How much will the library spend on print only journal subscriptions with no online counterpart in 2017 (anticipated)? (In US$) Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 2.3.4 How much will the library spend on print only journal subscriptions with no online counterpart in 2017 (anticipated)? (In US$) Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 3 What is the current breakdown of your journal title subscriptions among the three following options? (Each answer should be a percentage of 100%)
Table 3.1.1 Percentage of journals subscriptions accounted for by print only journals
Table 3.1.2 Percentage of journals subscriptions accounted for by print only journals Broken out by Type of organization
Table 3.1.3 Percentage of journals subscriptions accounted for by print only journals Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 3.1.4 Percentage of journals subscriptions accounted for by print only journals Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 3.2.1 Percentage of journals subscriptions accounted for by online only journals
Table 3.2.2 Percentage of journals subscriptions accounted for by online only journals Broken out by Type of organization
Table 3.2.3 Percentage of journals subscriptions accounted for by online only journals Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 3.2.4 Percentage of journals subscriptions accounted for by online only journals Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 3.3.1 Percentage of journals subscriptions accounted for by joint print and online journals
Table 3.3.2 Percentage of journals subscriptions accounted for by joint print and online journals Broken out by Type of organization
Table 3.3.3 Percentage of journals subscriptions accounted for by joint print and online journals Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 3.3.4 Percentage of journals subscriptions accounted for by joint print and online journals Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 4 What do you estimate will be the breakdown of your journal title subscriptions among the three following options in two years? (Each answer should be a percentage of 100%)
Table 4.1.1 Estimated percentage of journals subscriptions expected to be accounted for by print only journals in 2018
Table 4.1.2 Estimated percentage of journals subscriptions expected to be accounted for by print only journals in 2018 Broken out by Type of organization
Table 4.1.3 Estimated percentage of journals subscriptions expected to be accounted for by print only journals in 2018 Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 4.1.4 Estimated percentage of journals subscriptions expected to be accounted for by print only journals in 2018 Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 4.2.1 Estimated percentage of journals subscriptions expected to be accounted for by online only journals in 2018
Table 4.2.2 Estimated percentage of journals subscriptions expected to be accounted for by online only journals in 2018
Table 4.2.3 Estimated percentage of journals subscriptions expected to be accounted for by online only journals in 2018 Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 4.2.4 Estimated percentage of journals subscriptions expected to be accounted for by online only journals in 2018 Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 4.3.1 Estimated percentage of journals subscriptions expected to be accounted for by joint print and online journals in 2018
Table 4.3.2 Estimated percentage of journals subscriptions expected to be accounted for by joint print and online journals in 2018 Broken out by Type of organization
Table 4.3.3 Estimated percentage of journals subscriptions expected to be accounted for by joint print and online journals in 2018 Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 4.3.4 Estimated percentage of journals subscriptions expected to be accounted for by joint print and online journals in 2018 Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Sum up your library's prevailing philosophy about the future of print journals in your library. Broken out by Type of organization
Table 5 How much did the library spend on print books in each of the following years? (In US$)
Table 5.1.1 How much did the library spend on print books in 2015? (In US$)
Table 5.1.2 How much did the library spend on print books in 2015? (In US$) Broken out by Type of organization
Table 5.1.3 How much did the library spend on print books in 2015? (In US$) Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 5.1.4 How much did the library spend on print books in 2015? (In US$) Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 5.2.1 How much did the library spend on print books in 2016? (In US$)
Table 5.2.2 How much did the library spend on print books in 2016? (In US$) Broken out by Type of organization
Table 5.2.3 How much did the library spend on print books in 2016? (In US$) Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 5.2.4 How much did the library spend on print books in 2016? (In US$) Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 5.3.1 How much will the library spend on print books in 2017 (anticipated)? (In US$)
Table 5.3.2 How much will the library spend on print books in 2017 (anticipated)? (In US$) Broken out by Type of organization
Table 5.3.3 How much will the library spend on print books in 2017 (anticipated)? (In US$) Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 5.3.4 How much will the library spend on print books in 2017 (anticipated)? (In US$) Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 6 How much did your library spend on eBooks in each of the following years?
Table 6.1.1 How much did your library spend on eBooks in 2015? (In US$)
Table 6.1.2 How much did your library spend on eBooks in 2015? (In US$) Broken out by Type of organization
Table 6.1.3 How much did your library spend on eBooks in 2015? (In US$) Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 6.1.4 How much did your library spend on eBooks in 2015? (In US$) Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 6.2.1 How much did your library spend on eBooks in 2016? (In US$)
Table 6.2.2 How much did your library spend on eBooks in 2016? (In US$) Broken out by Type of organization
Table 6.2.3 How much did your library spend on eBooks in 2016? (In US$) Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 6.2.4 How much did your library spend on eBooks in 2016? (In US$) Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 6.3.1 How much will your library spend on eBooks in 2017 (anticipated)? (In US$)
Table 6.3.2 How much will your library spend on eBooks in 2017 (anticipated)? (In US$) Broken out by Type of organization
Table 6.3.3 How much will your library spend on eBooks in 2017 (anticipated)? (In US$) Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 6.3.4 How much will your library spend on eBooks in 2017 (anticipated)? (In US$) Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
To what degree have, if at all, eBooks replaced print books in your library and what is the outlook for print book purchases over the next few years vis a vis eBook alternatives?
What role has your inter-library loan capabilities and relations with consortia and other partners played in your print materials culling practices? Does the library maintain particularly vigorous print materials sharing arrangements with any other institutions?
How comfortable would you say your library patrons are with the substitution of eBooks forms for print? When does the acquisition of an ebook title lead you to eliminate or reduce your holdings of the print version of the same title?
In which areas has the library been most aggressive in eliminating print journal and book titles and why in these areas?
In which areas has your library been particularly reluctant to shed print journal and book titles and why in these areas?
In your view what will happen to your library's print materials collection over the next five years? Will it become larger or smaller? If so, what areas will be most affected and why? Will spending remain the same? Increase or decrease?
Table 7.1 Approximately what percentage of titles in your print book collection do you cull each year?
Table 7.2 Approximately what percentage of titles in your print book collection do you cull each year? Broken out by Type of organization
Table 7.3 Approximately what percentage of titles in your print book collection do you cull each year? Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 7.4 Approximately what percentage of titles in your print book collection do you cull each year? Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
If the library has changed its book acquisitions and/or book collection culling strategy over the past five years, or expects to change it soon, please describe these changes.
Table 8.1 If the library has reduced the size of its print collections in recent years, has this led to an increase in space that the library can use for other purposes?
Table 8.2 If the library has reduced the size of its print collections in recent years, has this led to an increase in space that the library can use for other purposes? Broken out by Type of organization
Table 8.3 If the library has reduced the size of its print collections in recent years, has this led to an increase in space that the library can use for other purposes? Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 8.4 If the library has reduced the size of its print collections in recent years, has this led to an increase in space that the library can use for other purposes? Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
If space has been freed-up over the past five years how much space and how is this space now being deployed?
Table 9.1 Has the library surveyed its patrons on their preferences for print vs. digital resources as a prelude to decision making on print vs digital in journal, book and other collections?
Table 9.2 Has the library surveyed its patrons on their preferences for print vs. digital resources as a prelude to decision making on print vs digital in journal, book and other collections? Broken out by Type of organization
Table 9.3 Has the library surveyed its patrons on their preferences for print vs. digital resources as a prelude to decision making on print vs digital in journal, book and other collections? Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 9.4 Has the library surveyed its patrons on their preferences for print vs. digital resources as a prelude to decision making on print vs digital in journal, book and other collections? Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
Table 10.1 Has your library measured use of print versions and digital versions when it maintains access to both forms of a particular resource?
Table 10.2 Has your library measured use of print versions and digital versions when it maintains access to both forms of a particular resource? Broken out by Type of organization
Table 10.3 Has your library measured use of print versions and digital versions when it maintains access to both forms of a particular resource? Broken out by Number of FTE librarians employed
Table 10.4 Has your library measured use of print versions and digital versions when it maintains access to both forms of a particular resource? Broken out for medical and all other scientific libraries
If you have studied the use of print and digital forms of the same legal resource, what have you learned and how have your studies informed your collection decision making?
For general and often non-scientific materials such as newspapers, magazines, newsletters, s and other works that might provide valuable background and context for scientists but are not specifically scientific materials, what is the library's print presence in these areas and how will it develop in the near future?
Mention some incidents, if any, in which the library was forced to back track and restore access to print copies of materials that had been culled in printed form.
What is the greatest mistake that the library has made in its print materials collection development decision making in recent years?

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