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2008 Africa - Telecoms, Mobile and Broadband in Central and Eastern Regions

This report provides a comprehensive overview of trends and developments in the telecommunications markets of eight African countries: Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Gabon, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda. Subjects covered include:

  • Key statistics;
  • Market and industry overviews;
  • Regulatory environment and structural reform;
  • Major players (fixed, mobile and broadband);
  • Infrastructure development;
  • Mobile voice and data markets, including 3G;
  • Average Revenue per User (ARPU) trends;
  • Internet, including broadband development;
  • Convergence (voice/data, fixed/wireless/mobile).


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Several new international submarine cable projects are set to bring large amounts of fibre-based bandwidth to countries along the continent’s east coast and in the interior for the first time in 2009. Paired with rollouts of national fibre optic backbones and wireless broadband infrastructures, this is creating new opportunities in an environment of converging technologies and services and promises to bring the long-awaited cost reduction and improved availability of telecommunications. Key countries in the region have privatised their incumbent telcos, liberalised international access and VoIP telephony, and implemented new competition frameworks. The region was a global pioneer in the abolishment of international roaming charges, and mobile payment and banking solutions are now bringing financial services to the 90% of the population that do not have bank accounts.

As in most African countries, Cameroon’s mobile market has been booming since competition was introduced, while the fixed-line sector has been stagnant. Convergence between fixed and mobile, voice and data services is now set to change the market dramatically. The fixed-line incumbent, Camtel, is re-entering the mobile sector through a third national licence, and the existing mobile operators are establishing themselves as leading ISPs by introducing mobile data services and acquiring existing ISPs. The mobile operators are also among the bidders in the privatisation of a majority stake in Camtel with a view to providing converged services. The existing ISPs are combining their forces by merging and preparing to offer VoIP services through newly established wireless broadband networks.

The Democratic Republic of Congo is a mineral-rich country that is recovering from civil strife and many years of pillage by its former leaders, which has accounted for the low level of development of its telecommunications and other infrastructure. While there has been little success with revitalising the fixed-line network infrastructure, the mobile networks have experienced strong growth and provide a replacement for fixed telephony and public payphones. Following the launch of mobile data services, they are also set to become major players in the underdeveloped Internet and broadband sector. Overall, market penetration is still well below the African average, leaving enormous potential for future growth.

Ethiopia still practices a monopoly in almost all areas of its telecoms sector. Market penetrationremains very low, but major efforts to roll out a national fibre backbone and wireless access networks have resulted in an acceleration of growth in all market segments. Further massive investments into fixed, mobile and Internet services, totalling US$4 billion, are planned for the five years to 2012. The government is intent on eventually privatising the national operator, ETC, and introducing competition in mobile and Internet services.

Following the introduction of competition between three service providers in Gabon, this relatively small and wealthy African nation has achieved one of the highest mobile market penetration rates on the continent, but its fixed-line and Internet sectors remain underdeveloped due to a lack of competition and the resulting high prices. The recently completed privatisation of Gabon Telecom may bring new impetus to the market if coupled with further market liberalisation.

Despite the civil unrest which cast a shadow on Kenya at the beginning of 2008, the fundamental transformation of its telecoms market continues. A consortium lead by France Telecom acquired a 51% stake in the national telco, Tekom Kenya. The IPO of the country’s leading mobile operator, Safaricom, went ahead very successfully in April, which is an encouraging sign for Telkom’s planned IPO. A new, simplified licensing regime designed to increase competition was introduced mid-year. Several competing wireless broadband networks and national fibre backbones are being rolled out, and several international submarine fibre optic cables are expected to launch from 2009. This will bring bandwidth prices down and open the Internet up to the mass market. The country’s GSM mobile market finally moved beyond a duopoly at the end of 2008 when Econet and Telkom Kenya launched services as the third and fourth players. Convergence is ever-present in this dynamic and fast growing market with voice, data and video/broadband TV (triple play) services, the introduction of 3G mobile services and mobile banking empowering the largely un-banked population.

In Rwanda, the aftermath of the 1994 genocide and a monopolistic market structure until 2006 have weighed on the telecoms sector, but the nation is now catching up with other markets in Africa. The privatised incumbent telco is more innovative than most of its African counterparts in the provision of market-driven, affordable services, and it is competing in the mobile sector as well. Rwanda has one of the most developed national fibre infrastructures in the region and is preparing to connect to the new high-bandwidth submarine cables being built along the east cost of Africa.

Tanzania has a fully competitive telecom sector with two fixed-line operators and six operational mobile networks, with four additional players licensed under a new converged regulatory regime. Growing at 50% per annum, the mobile market passed the ten million subscriber mark in 2008 with four dominating major operators. At a penetration level of only around 30%, growth is set to continue. The liberalisation of VoIP Internet telephony as well as the introduction of 3G mobile and other wireless broadband services is boosting the Internet sector, which has been hampered by the low level of development of the traditional fixed-line network.

As early as 1999, Uganda became the first country in Africa where the number of mobile subscribers passed the number of fixed-line users, and the ratio is now around 40:1. The entry of a second national operator and five mobile networks has revolutionised the telecoms sector. The market is consistently growing at between 50% and 100% per annum, while penetration at around 20% is still below the African average. The recent introduction of 3G services will enable the mobile operators to play a larger role in Internet service provision. A new simplified licensing regime has significantly reduced barriers to market entry and increased competition.

Key highlights:

  • Fixed-line, mobile and Internet market forecasts to 2010 and 2015 for Ethiopia and Gabon;
  • 3G mobile services are available in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and Rwanda, with Ethiopia preparing for launch;
  • Mobile TV launched in Kenya and Uganda;
  • At least six competing WiMAX wireless broadband networks are being rolled out in Kenya;
  • Privatised Gabon Telecom becomes the country’s fastest growing mobile network operator and expands fixed network by 30% within one year;
  • The government of Rwanda buys back the national telco for US$12 million and sells it for US$100 million three months later;
  • The DRC’s mobile operators claim they generate 30% of the total tax income of the state;
  • A number of countries in the region have taken a world lead role by abolishing international mobile roaming surcharges;
  • More than 10% of Kenya’s GDP now passes through the M-Pesa mobile payment and banking service, which has more users than there are bank account holders in the country.
Gabon Telecom fixed-line revenue versus mobile revenue - 2006 - 2007
Year Fixed Mobile
Revenue (US$ million)
2006 77 49
2007 63 71
(Source: BuddeComm based on company data)

Data in this report is the latest available at the time of preparation and may not be for the current year.

The following notes provide some background to our scenario forecasting methodology:
  • This report includes what we term scenario forecasts. By describing long-range scenarios we identify a band within which we expect market growth to occur. The associated text describes what we see as the most likely growth trend within this band.
  • The projections shown in the tables in this report are based on our own historical information, as well as on telecommunication sector statistics from official and non-official, national and international sources. We assume a possible deviation of 15-20% around this data.
  • All statistics for GDP, revenue, etc are shown in US$, in order to maintain consistency within and between markets. At the same time we acknowledge that this can introduce some irregularities.
This report provides a comprehensive overview of trends and developments in the telecommunications markets of eight African countries: Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Gabon, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda. Subjects covered include:
  • Key statistics;
  • Market and industry overviews;
  • Regulatory environment and structural reform;
  • Major players (fixed, mobile and broadband);
  • Infrastructure development;
  • Mobile voice and data markets, including 3G;
  • Average Revenue per User (ARPU) trends;
  • Internet, including broadband development;
  • Convergence (voice/data, fixed/wireless/mobile).
For those needing high level strategic information and objective analysis on this region, this report is essential reading and gives further information on:
  • Government policies affecting the telecoms industry;
  • Market liberalisation;
  • Telecoms operators - privatisation, acquisitions, new licences and competition;
  • Internet and broadband development and growth;
  • The fast growing mobile markets of the region;
  • ARPU;
  • Mobile application and content developments.

1. CAMEROON
1.1 Key statistics
1.2 Overview of Cameroon’s telecom market
1.3 Regulatory environment
1.3.1 Sector reorganisation and liberalisation
1.3.2 Licensing
1.3.3 International gateways
1.3.4 Universal Access Fund (UAF)
1.3.5 Regulatory authority
1.3.5.1 Agence de Regulation des Telecommunications (ART)
1.3.6 Privatisation of Camtel
1.4 Fixed-line operators in Cameroon
1.4.1 Camtel
1.4.2 Pastel
1.5 Telecommunications infrastructure
1.5.1 National infrastructure
1.5.2 Fixed-line statistics
1.5.3 Wireless local loop (WLL)
1.5.4 International infrastructure
1.6 Data market
1.6.1 Campac
1.6.2 VSAT networks
1.7 Internet market
1.7.1 Overview
1.7.1.1 Internet statistics
1.7.2 Internet access locations
1.7.3 Cameroon’s ISP market
1.7.3.1 CamNet
1.7.3.2 MTN Network Solutions (MTN NS)
1.7.3.3 Matrix Telecoms
1.7.3.4 Other ISPs
1.8 Broadband market
1.8.1 Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL)
1.8.2 Wireless broadband
1.8.2.1 WiMAX
1.8.2.2 WiFi
1.9 Mobile communications
1.9.1 Overview of Cameroon’s mobile market
1.9.1.1 Mobile statistics
1.9.2 Major mobile operators
1.9.2.1 MTN Cameroon
1.9.2.2 Orange CM
1.9.2.3 Cameroon Mobile Telecommunications (CMT)
1.9.3 Mobile Virtual Network Operators (MVNO)
1.9.4 Mobile voice services
1.9.4.1 Satellite mobile
2. DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO
2.1 Key statistics
2.2 Country overview
2.3 Overview of the DRC’s telecom market
2.4 Regulatory environment
2.4.1 Overview
2.4.2 Regulatory authority
2.4.2.1 Autorité de Régulation de la Poste et des Télécommunications du Congo (ARPTC)
2.4.3 Interconnection
2.4.4 Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)
2.4.5 Competition in the telecom sector
2.5 Fixed-line operators in the DRC
2.5.1 OCPT
2.5.1.1 National backbone
2.5.1.2 Privatisation
2.5.2 Tatem Telecom
2.5.3 Other operators
2.5.4 Fixed-line statistics
2.5.5 International infrastructure
2.6 Broadband and Internet market
2.6.1 Overview
2.6.1.1 Internet user statistics
2.6.2 ISP market
2.6.2.1 Africanus.net
2.6.2.2 InterConnect, Vodanet
2.6.2.3 Microcom
2.6.2.4 Other ISPs
2.6.3 Internet cafes
2.7 Mobile communications
2.7.1 Overview of the DRC’s mobile market
2.7.1.1 Mobile statistics
2.7.2 Regulatory issues
2.7.2.1 GSM licence conditions, fees and taxes
2.7.3 Major mobile operators
2.7.3.1 Vodacom Congo
2.7.3.2 Zain DRC (formerly Celtel)
2.7.3.3 Tigo (Millicom)
2.7.3.4 CCT
2.7.4 Mobile data services
3. ETHIOPIA
3.1 Key statistics
3.2 Overview of Ethiopia’s telecom market
3.3 Regulatory environment
3.3.1 Regulatory authority
3.3.1.1 Ethiopian Telecommunications Agency (ETA)
3.3.2 Telecom service licences
3.3.3 Telecom sector liberalisation
3.3.4 Privatisation of ETC
3.4 Fixed network operator
3.4.1 Ethiopian Telecommunications Corporation
3.4.1.1 Fixed-line statistics
3.4.1.2 Fixed-line infrastructure
3.4.1.3 Rural area networks
3.4.1.4 Wireless Local Loop (WLL)
3.4.1.5 Telephone traffic
3.4.1.6 Leased lines, data services
3.4.1.7 VSATs
3.4.1.8 National backbone network
3.4.1.9 Next Generation Network (NGN)
3.4.1.10 International infrastructure
3.4.1.11 US$4 billion network development plan 2007-2012
3.5 Internet and broadband market
3.5.1 Overview
3.5.1.1 Internet statistics
3.5.2 National connectivity
3.5.3 Internet access locations
3.5.4 ISP market
3.5.4.1 EthioNet
3.5.5 Broadband market
3.5.5.1 Asymmetrical Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL)
3.5.5.2 WiMAX
3.5.5.3 Broadband via satellite
3.5.6 Wholesale
3.6 Mobile communications
3.6.1 Overview of Ethiopia’s mobile market
3.6.1.1 Mobile statistics
3.6.2 Mobile technologies
3.6.2.1 3G
3.6.3 Major mobile operator
3.6.3.1 Ethio-Mobile
3.6.4 Mobile data services
3.6.5 Mobile voice services
3.6.5.1 Satellite mobile
3.7 Forecasts
3.7.1 Forecasts - fixed-line services to 2015
3.7.2 Forecasts - Internet users to 2015
3.7.3 Forecasts - mobile subscribers to 2015
4. GABON
4.1 Key statistics
4.2 Country overview
4.3 Overview of Gabon’s telecom market
4.4 Regulatory environment
4.4.1 Historical background
4.4.2 Regulatory authority
4.4.2.1 Agency of Regulation of Telecommunications (ARTEL)
4.4.3 Market liberalisation
4.4.4 Interconnection
4.5 Fixed network operator in Gabon
4.5.1 Gabon Télécom
4.5.1.1 Privatisation
4.5.1.2 National telecom network
4.5.1.3 Fixed-line statistics
4.5.1.4 International infrastructure
4.6 Broadband and Internet market
4.6.1 Overview
4.6.1.1 Internet statistics
4.6.2 ISP market
4.6.2.1 Gabon Télécom
4.6.2.2 Internet Gabon
4.6.2.3 Solsi
4.6.3 Broadband
4.6.3.1 ADSL
4.6.3.2 WiMAX
4.7 Mobile communications
4.7.1 Overview of Gabon’s mobile market
4.7.1.1 Mobile statistics
4.7.2 Major mobile operators
4.7.2.1 Zain Gabon (Celtel)
4.7.2.2 Libertis (Gabon Telecom)
4.7.2.3 Moov (Telecel Gabon)
4.7.3 Mobile voice services
4.7.3.1 Prepaid cards
4.8 Forecasts
4.8.1 Forecasts - fixed-line market to 2015
4.8.2 Forecasts - Internet market to 2015
4.8.3 Forecasts - mobile market to 2015
5. KENYA
5.1 Key statistics
5.2 Overview of Kenya’s telecom market
5.3 Regulatory environment
5.3.1 Kenya Communications Act 1998
5.3.2 Revised Telecommunications Market Structure 2004
5.3.3 New ICT Bill 2006, Universal Access Fund
5.3.4 Regulatory authority
5.3.4.1 Communications Commission of Kenya (CCK)
5.3.5 Tariff regulation
5.3.6 Foreign ownership
5.3.7 Number portability
5.3.8 Telecom sector liberalisation in Kenya
5.3.9 Regional telecom licences
5.3.10 Second national operator licensing
5.3.10.1 First attempt fails in 2004
5.3.10.2 Second attempt fails in 2007
5.3.11 International gateway licences
5.3.12 Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) telephony
5.3.13 New licensing regime 2008
5.4 Fixed network operators in Kenya
5.4.1 Telkom Kenya Ltd
5.4.1.1 Licence obligations
5.4.1.2 Privatisation of Telkom Kenya
5.4.1.2.1 First attempt fails in 2001
5.4.1.2.2 Telkom’s difficult financial position
5.4.1.2.3 The long run to privatisation in 2007
5.4.2 Fixed-wireless operators
5.5 Telecommunications infrastructure
5.5.1 National telecommunications infrastructure
5.5.1.1 Fixed-line statistics
5.5.1.2 Telkom Kenya
5.5.1.2.1 Wireless Local Loop (WLL)
5.5.1.2.2 National fibre backbone
5.5.1.3 Kenya Data Networks (KDN)
5.5.1.4 Kenya Power and Lighting Company (KPLC)
5.5.1.5 Kenya Pipeline Corporation (KPC)
5.5.1.6 Kenya Postal Corporation
5.5.2 International infrastructure
5.5.2.1 Satellite
5.5.2.2 Terrestrial
5.5.2.2.1 Eastern Africa Backhaul System (EABs)
5.5.2.3 Submarine cables
5.5.2.3.1 Eastern Africa Submarine Cable System (EASSy)
5.5.2.3.2 The East African Marine System (TEAMS)
5.5.2.3.3 KDN and FLAG Telecom
5.5.2.3.4 SeaCom
5.6 Internet market
5.6.1 Overview
5.6.1.1 Internet statistics
5.6.2 Average revenue per user (ARPU)
5.6.3 Public Internet access locations
5.6.3.1 Digital Villages
5.6.4 Internet backbone
5.6.4.1 Public data network operators (PDNO)
5.6.4.2 JamboNet
5.6.4.3 Additional Internet backbone licences 2005
5.6.5 Kenya Internet exchange point (KIXP)
5.6.6 Kenya Network Information Centre (KENIC)
5.6.7 ISP market
5.6.7.1 Africa Online Kenya
5.6.7.1.1 Takeover by Telkom SA
5.6.7.2 UUNet Kenya
5.6.7.3 Wananchi Online, ISP Kenya
5.6.7.4 Swift Global
5.6.7.5 Access Kenya
5.6.7.6 InterConnect, Internet Solutions Kenya
5.6.7.7 Jambo Telkom
5.6.7.8 Other ISPs
5.7 Broadband market
5.7.1 Overview
5.7.2 VSATs
5.7.3 Leased lines
5.7.4 Asymmetrical Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL)
5.7.4.1 ADSL2
5.7.5 Wireless broadband
5.7.5.1 WiFi
5.7.5.2 WiMAX
5.7.6 Mobile data services
5.7.6.1 Fixed-wireless operators
5.8 Convergence
5.8.1 VoIP telephony
5.8.1.1 New VoIP guidelines 2005
5.8.1.2 VoIP licences 2006
5.8.2 Triple play
5.8.3 Digital TV
5.9 Mobile communications
5.9.1 Overview of Kenya’s mobile market
5.9.1.1 Mobile statistics
5.9.2 Regulatory issues
5.9.2.1 Interconnection and tariffs
5.9.2.2 International gateways
5.9.2.3 Mobile Number Portability (MNP)
5.9.2.4 Quality of Service (QoS) control
5.9.2.5 Special regional tariffs
5.9.2.6 International roaming
5.9.2.6.1 Free international roaming
5.9.3 Mobile technologies
5.9.3.1 Third generation (3G) mobile
5.9.4 Major mobile operators
5.9.4.1 Safaricom Ltd
5.9.4.1.1 Network expansion 2005-2007
5.9.4.2 Zain Kenya (formerly Celtel, KenCell)
5.9.4.3 Third mobile network licence: Econet
5.9.4.4 Fourth mobile licence: Telkom Kenya
5.9.5 Mobile voice services
5.9.5.1 Prepaid cards
5.9.5.2 VoIP
5.9.5.3 Flashback
5.9.5.4 GSM community phones
5.9.5.5 Satellite mobile
5.9.6 Mobile data services
5.9.6.1 Short Message Service (SMS)
5.9.6.1.1 Job offers by SMS
5.9.6.2 Multimedia Messaging (MMS)
5.9.6.3 GPRS and EDGE
5.9.6.4 Mobile Internet
5.9.6.5 Mobile TV
5.9.7 Mobile content and applications
5.9.7.1 M-payment
6. RWANDA
6.1 Key statistics
6.2 Country overview
6.3 Overview of Rwanda’s telecom market
6.4 Regulatory environment
6.4.1 Regulatory authority
6.4.1.1 Rwanda Utilities Regulatory Agency (RURA)
6.4.1.2 RITA and NICT
6.4.2 Market liberalisation
6.4.2.1 Third national operator licence
6.4.3 Interconnection
6.4.4 Universal Access Fund
6.5 Fixed network operators in Rwanda
6.5.1 Rwandatel/Terracom
6.5.1.1 Privatisation
6.5.2 Artel Communications
6.6 Telecommunications infrastructure
6.6.1 Fixed-line statistics
6.6.2 Fixed-line network
6.6.3 Wireless local loop (WLL)
6.6.4 National backbone network
6.6.5 International infrastructure
6.6.5.1 VSATs
6.6.5.2 Proposed EASSy submarine cable
6.6.5.3 The East African Marine System (TEAMS)
6.6.5.4 The Eastern Africa Backhaul System (EABS)
6.6.5.5 Service provision to the DRC
6.7 Internet market
6.7.1 Overview
6.7.1.1 Internet statistics
6.7.2 ISP market
6.7.3 Rwanda Internet Exchange Point (RIXP)
6.7.4 Cybercafes and telecentres
6.7.5 One Laptop per Child (OLPC)
6.7.6 VoIP
6.7.7 E-government
6.8 Broadband market
6.8.1 Overview
6.8.2 Asymmetrical Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL)
6.8.3 WiMAX
6.9 Mobile communications
6.9.1 Overview of Rwanda’s mobile market
6.9.1.1 Mobile statistics
6.9.2 Mobile technologies
6.9.2.1 3G
6.9.3 Major mobile operators
6.9.3.1 MTN Rwanda
6.9.3.1.1 General Packet Radio Service (GPRS)
6.9.3.1.2 Tuvugane and VillagePhone
6.9.3.2 Terracom Mobile/Rwandatel
6.9.4 Mobile content and applications
6.9.4.1 Mobile banking
6.9.4.2 M-payment
7. TANZANIA
7.1 Key statistics
7.2 Overview of Tanzania’s telecom market
7.3 Regulatory environment
7.3.1 Background
7.3.2 Regulatory authority
7.3.2.1 Tanzania Communications Regulatory Authority
7.3.3 National Telecommunications Policy 1997
7.3.4 National ICT Policy 2003
7.3.5 New legislation 2005
7.3.6 Telecom sector liberalisation in Tanzania
7.3.6.1 Converged licensing framework (CLF) 2005 - 2006
7.3.6.2 International gateways
7.3.7 Interconnection
7.3.8 Universal service fund
7.4 Fixed network operators
7.4.1 Tanzania Telecommunications Co Ltd (TTCL)
7.4.1.1 Privatisation and exclusivity period 2000-2005
7.4.1.2 Management contract 2007-2010
7.4.1.3 Future privatisation plans
7.4.2 Zanzibar Telecommunications Corporation
7.5 Telecommunications infrastructure
7.5.1 National telecom network
7.5.2 Fixed-line statistics
7.5.3 Wireless Local Loop (WLL)
7.5.4 Multipurpose community telecentres (MCT)
7.5.5 Private networks
7.5.6 National fibre backbone
7.5.7 International infrastructure
7.6 Internet market
7.6.1 Overview
7.6.1.1 Internet statistics
7.6.2 Internet access locations
7.6.3 Data operators
7.6.4 International connectivity
7.6.4.1 VSAT networks
7.6.4.1.1 SatCom Networks Africa Ltd (SCNA)
7.6.5 Tanzania Internet Exchange Point (TIX)
7.7 Broadband market
7.7.1 Asymmetrical Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL)
7.7.2 Wireless broadband
7.7.2.1 WiMAX
7.7.3 ISP market
7.7.3.1 Africa Online Tanzania
7.7.3.2 Raha.com
7.7.3.3 Tele2 (CyberTwiga Ltd)
7.7.3.4 Alink (Datel)
7.7.3.5 Internet Africa (Tanzania)
7.7.3.6 Afsat
7.7.3.7 Cats-Net
7.8 Convergence
7.8.1 VoIP telephony
7.9 Mobile communications
7.9.1 Overview of Tanzania’s mobile market
7.9.1.1 Mobile statistics
7.9.2 Regulatory issues
7.9.2.1 Tariffs
7.9.2.1.1 Special regional tariffs
7.9.2.1.2 Free international roaming
7.9.3 Mobile technologies
7.9.3.1 3G mobile and WiMAX
7.9.4 Major mobile operators
7.9.4.1 MIC Tanzania Ltd (Mobitel, Tigo)
7.9.4.2 Vodacom Tanzania Ltd
7.9.4.3 Zain Tanzania (formerly Celtel)
7.9.4.4 Zantel
8. UGANDA
8.1 Key statistics
8.2 Overview of Uganda’s telecom market
8.3 Regulatory environment
8.3.1 Background
8.3.2 Regulatory authority
8.3.2.1 Uganda Communications Commission (UCC)
8.3.3 Telecommunications Policy 1996
8.3.4 Uganda Communications Act 1997
8.3.5 Telecom sector liberalisation in Uganda
8.3.5.1 International gateway licences
8.3.6 New competition framework 2005
8.3.7 New ICT policy 2006
8.3.8 New licensing regime 2007
8.3.9 Regulation of Interception of Communication Bill 2007
8.3.10 Rural Development Program
8.3.10.1 RCDF projects
8.4 Fixed network operators in Uganda
8.4.1 Uganda Telecom Ltd
8.4.1.1 Privatisation
8.4.1.2 IPO 2009
8.4.2 MTN Uganda Ltd
8.5 Telecommunications infrastructure
8.5.1 National telecom and backbone networks
8.5.2 Wireless Local Loop (WLL)
8.5.3 Multipurpose Community Telecentres (MCTs)
8.5.4 International infrastructure
8.6 Data market
8.6.1 Data infrastructure
8.6.2 VSAT networks
8.7 Internet market
8.7.1 Overview
8.7.1.1 Internet statistics
8.7.2 Freenet
8.7.3 Internet Easy
8.7.4 Uganda Internet Exchange Point (UiXP)
8.7.5 Internet access locations
8.7.6 Cost of bandwidth
8.7.7 Internet initiatives
8.7.7.1 Women of Uganda network (WOUGNET)
8.7.7.2 World Links/SchoolNet Uganda
8.8 Broadband market
8.8.1 Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL)
8.8.2 WiMAX
8.8.3 ISP market
8.8.3.1 Africa Online Uganda
8.8.3.2 Infocom
8.8.3.3 UTL Online
8.8.3.4 Bushnet
8.9 Convergence
8.9.1 VoIP telephony
8.9.2 Next Generation Networks (NGNs)
8.9.3 Powerline Communication (PLC)
8.9.4 E-commerce
8.9.5 E-banking
8.9.6 E-government
8.9.7 Overview of broadcasting market
8.9.8 Digital TV
8.9.8.1 Broadband TV (IPTV)
8.9.8.2 Pay TV
8.10 Mobile communications
8.10.1 Overview of Uganda’s mobile market
8.10.1.1 Mobile statistics
8.10.2 Regulatory issues
8.10.2.1 Tariffs
8.10.2.1.1 Per second billing
8.10.3 Mobile technologies
8.10.3.1 Third generation (3G)
8.10.4 Major mobile operators
8.10.4.1 MTN Uganda
8.10.4.1.1 MTN VillagePhone project
8.10.4.2 Zain Uganda (Celtel)
8.10.4.3 Uganda Telecom Ltd (UTL)
8.10.4.4 Warid Telecom
8.10.4.5 Fifth mobile licence (HITS Telecom, Orange)
8.10.5 Mobile voice services
8.10.5.1 Satellite mobile
8.10.6 Mobile data services
8.10.6.1 Short Message Service (SMS)
8.10.6.2 Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS)
8.10.6.3 GPRS and EDGE
8.10.6.4 BlackBerry
8.10.6.5 Mobile TV
9. GLOSSARY OF ABBREVIATIONS


LIST OF TABLES
Table 2 - Country statistics Cameroon - 2008
Table 3 - Telephone network statistics - June 2008
Table 4 - Internet provider statistics - 2008
Table 5 - Internet user statistics - 2007
Table 6 - Mobile statistics - March 2008
Table 7 - National telecommunications authority
Table 8 - Fixed lines in service and teledensity - 1995 - 2008
Table 9 - Internet users and penetration rate - 1997 - 2007
Table 10 - Mobile operators, subscribers and annual change - March 2008
Table 11 - Mobile subscribers and penetration rate - 1995 - 1996; 1998 - 200812
Table 12 - Country statistics Democratic Republic of Congo - 2008
Table 13 - Telephone network statistics - 2007
Table 14 - Internet provider statistics - 2007
Table 15 - Internet user statistics - 2007
Table 16 - Mobile statistics - March 2008
Table 17 - National telecommunications authority
Table 18 - Fixed telephone lines and teledensity - 1995 - 2007
Table 19 - Internet users and penetration rate - 1996 - 2007
Table 20 - Vodanet pricing - shared bandwidth - 2008
Table 21 - Mobile subscribers and penetration rate - 1996; 1998 - 2008
Table 22 - Mobile operators, subscribers and annual change - March 2008
Table 23 - Vodacom Congo monthly ARPU - 2003 - 2008
Table 24 - Zain DRC monthly ARPU - 2002 - 2008
Table 25 - Vodacom Congo mobile data pricing - 2008
Table 26 - Country statistics Ethiopia - 2008
Table 27 - Telephone network statistics - March 2008
Table 28 - Internet provider statistics - 2008
Table 29 - Internet user statistics - 2007
Table 30 - Mobile statistics - March 2008
Table 31 - National telecommunications authority
Table 32 - ETC revenue and profit - 2006 - 2008
Table 33 - Fixed-lines in service and teledensity - 1995 - 2008
Table 34 - Domestic and international telephone traffic - 1994 - 2005
Table 35 - Internet users and penetration rate - 1996 - 2007
Table 36 - Internet subscribers - 1997 - 2006
Table 37 - Mobile subscribers and penetration rate - 1999 - 2008
Table 38 - Forecast fixed-line and fixed-wireless subscribers - 2010; 2015
Table 39 - Forecast Internet users - 2010; 2015
Table 40 - Forecast mobile subscribers - 2010; 2015
Table 41 - Country statistics Gabon - 2008
Table 42 - Telephone network statistics - June 2008
Table 43 - Internet provider statistics - 2008
Table 44 - Internet user statistics - 2007
Table 45 - Mobile statistics - June 2008
Table 46 - National telecommunications authority
Table 47 - Gabon Télécom fixed-line versus mobile revenue - 2006 - 2007
Table 48 - Fixed-lines in service and teledensity - 1997 - 2008
Table 49 - International Internet bandwidth in Mb/s - 1999 - 2006
Table 50 - Internet users and penetration rate - 2002 - 2007
Table 51 - Mobile operators, subscribers and annual change - June 2008
Table 52 - Mobile subscribers and penetration rate - 1999 - 2008
Table 53 - Forecast fixed-line and fixed-wireless subscribers - 2010; 2015
Table 54 - Forecast Internet users - 2010; 2015
Table 55 - Forecast mobile subscribers - 2010; 2015
Table 56 - Country statistics Kenya - 2008
Table 57 - Telephone network statistics - 2007
Table 58 - Internet provider statistics - 2008
Table 59 - Internet user statistics - 2007
Table 60 - Mobile statistics - March 2008
Table 61 - National telecommunications authorities
Table 62 - Fixed lines in service and annual change - 1995 - 2007
Table 63 - Internet users and annual change - 1996 - 2007
Table 64 - Mobile subscribers and annual change - 1996 - 2008
Table 65 - Mobile operators, subscribers and annual change - March 2008
Table 66 - Country statistics Rwanda - 2008
Table 67 - Telephone network statistics - 2007
Table 68 - Internet provider statistics - 2008
Table 69 - Internet user statistics - 2007
Table 70 - Mobile statistics - March 2008
Table 71 - National telecommunications authority
Table 72 - Fixed-lines in service and teledensity - 1999 - 2007
Table 73 - Internet users and penetration rate - 1999 - 2007
Table 74 - Mobile operators, subscribers and annual change - March 2008
Table 75 - Mobile subscribers and penetration rate - 1999 - 2008
Table 76 - Country statistics Tanzania - 2008
Table 77 - Telephone network statistics - June 2008
Table 78 - Internet provider statistics - June 2008
Table 79 - Internet user statistics - 2007
Table 80 - Mobile statistics - June 2008
Table 81 - National telecommunications authority
Table 82 - Fixed-lines in service by operator and teledensity - 1995 - 2008
Table 83 - Internet users and penetration rate - 1996 - 2007
Table 84 - Mobile operators, subscribers and annual change - June 2008
Table 85 - Mobile subscribers and penetration rate - 1995 - 2008
Table 86 - Country statistics Uganda - 2008
Table 87 - Telephone network statistics - June 2008
Table 88 - Internet provider statistics - June 2008
Table 89 - Internet user statistics - June 2008
Table 90 - Mobile statistics - June 2008
Table 91 - National telecommunications authority
Table 92 - Fixed lines in service and teledensity - 1995 - 2008
Table 93 - Total data uplink and downlink capacity - 1998 - 2008
Table 94 - Internet users and penetration rate - 1995 - 2008
Table 95 - Mobile subscribers - 1996 - 2008
Table 96 - Mobile operators, subscribers and annual change - June 2008
Table 97 - MTN Uganda subscribers - 2000 - 2008
Table 98 - MTN Uganda ARPU - 2002 - 2008
Table 99 - Celtel Uganda ARPU - 2006 - 2008


LIST OF EXHIBITS
Exhibit 1 - International gateway licences fees
Exhibit 2 - The CCK coup of 2005
Exhibit 3 - Texting elephants
Exhibit 4 - Free international roaming
Exhibit 5 - Licences issued under the new CLF - 2006 and 2008
Exhibit 6 - VSAT users and applications
Exhibit 7 - Licensed ISPs in Uganda - 2007

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