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The U.S. Youth Market: How 15- to 24-Year-Old Consumers are Transforming the Marketplace, 2nd Edition

The U.S. Youth Market, 2nd Edition, new Packaged Facts report, analyzes the lifestyles and attitudes of the 42 million young consumers in the 15- to 24-year-old age group. By using data from both the Simmons Teens and the Simmons Adult National Consumer Surveys, the report allows marketers to key on the similarities and differences between kids approaching their late teens (15- to 17-year-olds) and young consumers entering adulthood (18- to 24-year-olds).

The first section of the report contains a detailed demographic profile of the youth market, including population projections, income and employment patterns, school enrollment data, and trends in living arrangements. The report continues with an in-depth analysis of the consumer behavior of 15- to 24-year-olds and provides an overview of consumer expenditure patterns, shopping behavior, and profiles of consumer attitudes in key areas including food, fashion, and finances. The report then focuses on how technological advances such as multi-feature cell phone handsets are transforming media usage and entertainment choices within the youth market. Separate chapters are devoted to the all-important college segment and trendsetting urban youth segment of the market. The final section of the report identifies key trends in the market, including projected growth rates, new marketing strategies and advertising platforms emerging in the youth market, and strategic trends and opportunities.

Most young consumers have grown up with the Internet and take for granted the ongoing revolution in their media environment. American youths are now driving a phenomenal increase in text messaging volume and other wireless data services, and they are leading the way in adopting new devices such as portable digital audio players. The fast pace of change in the lives of these young consumers continues to test the ingenuity of marketers and advertisers seeking to capture a share of this $485 billion market.

Report Methodology
The information in The U.S. Youth Market is based on both primary and secondary research. Primary research involved interviews with experts, public relations and industry analysts in firms that specialize late teen/early adult market research. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature.

About the Authors Dr. Robert Brown and Ms. Ruth Washton have written more than 25 Packaged Facts reports analyzing demographic trends and marketing strategies in key consumer segments. Topics have ranged from kids to mature consumers to multicultural groups such as Hispanics and African Americans. Dr. Brown and Ms. Washton have co-authored several Financial Times Business Reports on strategic business issues and have provided market and competitor intelligence studies for clients in a variety of industries. Dr. Brown has a B.S. from Georgetown University and a Ph.D. degree from The George Washington University. Ms. Washton has a B.A from Skidmore College and an M.A. from the State University of New York.

What You’ll Get in this Report
Learn about how some marketers are pushing the technological envelope to capture the attention of young consumers. Find out whether those in their 20s are more open to traditional advertising than their teenage counterparts. Learn about the profound shift in spending priorities now underway among young consumers.

Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is interested in reaching the lucrative 15- to 24-year-old consumer, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight about teens and young adults not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current demographic profile of the U.S. teen and young adult population. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of data from published and trade sources, and in-depth examinations of the economic and societal trends that influence the consumer behaviors of this large and influential segment of the population.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for teens and young adults.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for products targeting the 15-to-24-year-old consumer.
  • Advertising agencies to develop messages and images that compel young adults to purchase these products.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.


  • Executive Summary
    • Introduction
      • Background
      • Overview of Report
    • Scope of Report
      • Youth Market Defined
      • Methodology
    • Demographic Overview
      • Youth Population Totals 41 Million
      • Youth Population Will Register Below-Average Growth
      • Nearly 40% of Youth Are Members of Multicultural Population Segments
      • Multicultural Trend to Continue
    • Work, School, and Money
      • Aggregate Income Totals $335 Billion
      • Part-Time Work Common
      • Teens Hit Hard by Poor Economy
      • Higher Education Remains Elusive Goal for Most Youths
    • Family, Friends, and Roommates
      • Most Teens Still Live with Parents
      • Most Teens Get Along with Their Parents
      • Most Youths in Early 20s Are on Their Own
      • Many Young Women Have Own Families
      • Young Women More Likely to Marry and to Be Parents
    • Consumer Expenditure Patterns
      • Under-25 Consumer Differs from Average Consumer
      • Young Single Consumers Better Educated than Other Under-25 Consumers
      • Under-25 Consumer Units Highly Influential in Key Expenditure Categories
      • Single Young Men Spend More on Eating Out
      • Young Single Women Place High Priority on Clothes
    • Highlights of Consumer Behavior
      • Young Women Shop More and Like It More than the Average U.S. Woman
      • Young Men More Interested in Shopping than Average U.S. Male
      • Young Male Consumers More Brand Loyal
      • Celebrities' Influence on Fashion Choices of Young Women Grows Stronger
      • Calorie Counting Not an Issue for 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Teen Girls More Concerned about Dieting
      • Healthy Eating Has Lower Priority
      • But Vegetarians More Common in Youth Market
      • Healthy Snack Foods Not an Issue
      • Frozen Dinners and Pre-Cooked Meals Get Nod from Young Consumers
      • Young Consumers More Adventurous In Food Choices
      • Teens More Conservative with Finances
      • Young Consumers Less Afraid of Stock Market
    • Impact of Technology and the Internet on the Youth Market
      • Teens' Ownership of Cell Phones Explodes
      • Text Messaging and Other Data Services Take Off in Youth Market
      • Surveys Show Above-Average Use of Data Services by Young Cell Phone Subscribers
      • Portable Digital Audio Players Take Hold in Youth Market
      • Teens Use the Internet the Most
      • Online Activities Analyzed
      • Older Youths More Likely to Buy Online
    • Media Usage and Entertainment Choices
      • Internet Continues to Affect Media Usage of Youth
      • Teens Turn to Internet for Music and Sports, Older Youth for News and Information
      • Older Teens Grow More Negative toward TV
      • 18- to 24-Year-Olds Less Involved with Television
      • Teens Prefer Computers to Books
      • Teen Girls Lead in Movie Attendance
      • Live Events Important Entertainment Options for 18- to 24-Year- Olds
      • Video Games Lose Favor as Teens Get Older
      • Online Games Popular among Young Women
    • The College Segment
      • Full-Time Four-Year Enrollment Tops 6.8 Million
      • Nearly 50% of Full-Time College Students Have Jobs
      • College Students Most Likely to Own Cell Phones
      • Text Messaging More Common on Campuses
      • Nearly All College Students Online
      • Online Banking Popular with College Students
      • Female College Students More Likely to Buy Online
      • Media Habits of College Men Most Affected by Internet
      • Downloading Music Major Pastime for Students
    • The Multicultural Urban Youth Segment
      • Mobile Media Capabilities Less Common among Young Multicultural Males
      • Urban Youth Less Likely to Multitask When Watching Television
      • Choices of Radio Formats Reveal Cultural Differences
      • Opening Weekend Favored by Young Moviegoers
      • Urban Youth Less Likely to Play Video Games
      • Multicultural Urban Youth More Interested in Trying New Foods
      • Dieting More Common
      • Urban Apparel Brands Hit Speed Bump
    • Size and Growth of the Market
      • Expenditures of 15- to 24-Year-Olds Total $485 Billion
      • Young Women Spend Nearly as Much as Young Men
      • Family Expenditures on 15- to 17-Year-Olds Are Major Factor in Youth Market
      • Youth Market Will Total $555 Billion in 2009
    • Marketing and Advertising Trends
      • Few Teens Swayed by Advertising
      • Advertising in Movie Theatres Works Well in Youth Market
      • Young Males Prime Targets for TV Commercials
      • Young Women Drawn to Magazine Ads
      • Teens Most Likely to Disparage Online Advertising Techniques
      • "Third-Screen" Marketing Reaches Critical Mass
      • Study Questions Effectiveness of Stand-Alone Mobile Advertising
      • Video Games Seen as Underutilized Advertising Platform
    • Trends and Opportunities
      • Today's Youth Market Reveals the Future for Marketers
      • Technology Trumps Traditional Teen Choices
      • Female Gamers and Techies Deserve Marketers' Attention
  • Overview of the Youth Population
    • Size and Growth of Population
      • Youth Population Totals 41 Million
        • Table Size of Youth Population by Selected Age Groups, 2004 (in thousands)
      • Youth Population Skewed toward Males
        • Table Size of the 15- to 24-Year-Old Population by Gender and Age Group, 2004 (in thousands)
      • Youth Population Will Register Below-Average Growth
        • Table Growth in the 15- to 24-Year-Old Population by Age Group, 2004 vs. 2009 (in thousands)
        • Table Growth of U.S. Population by Age Group, 2004 vs. 2009 (in thousands)
    • The Multicultural Youth Population
      • Nearly 40% of Youth Are Members of Multicultural Population Segments
        • Table Race and Hispanic Origin of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2004 (in thousands)
        • Table Non-Hispanic White Population by Age Group, 2004 (in thousands)
      • Multicultural Trend to Continue
        • Table Growth of the 15- to 24-Year-Old Population, Non-Hispanic Whites vs. Other Population Groups, 2005 vs. 2010 (in thousands)
        • Table Growth of the 15- to 24-Year-Old Population by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2005 vs. 2010 (in thousands)
  • Work, School, and Money
    • Income Sources
      • Aggregate Income Totals $335 Billion
        • Table Aggregate Income of 15- to 24-Year-Olds, by Age Group and Gender, 2003
      • Income Sources of 15- to 24-Year-Olds Reflect Stage in Life
        • Table Sources of Income, 15- to 24-Year-Olds vs. People 25 Years Old and Over, 2003
      • Below-Average Incomes Mean Above-Average Expenditures
        • Table Average Annual Expenditures of Consumer Units as Percent of Before-Tax Income, by Age Group, 2003
    • Employment Patterns and Earning Power
      • Part-Time Work Common
        • Table Full-Time vs. Part-Time Status of Working 16- to 24-Year-Olds, 2004 (in thousands)
      • Young Men Earn the Most
        • Table Aggregate Earnings of 18- to 24-Year-Olds, 2003
      • Youth Employment Peaks in Summer Months
        • Table Employment Status of 16- to 24-Year-Olds, April-July 2004 (in thousands)
      • High School Dropouts Fare Poorly in Labor Market
        • Table Labor Force Status of 2004 High School Graduates and 2003-2004 High School Dropouts (in thousands)
      • College Grads Do Well
        • Table Mean Income of 18- to 24-Year-Olds with Earnings, by Educational Attainment and Work Experience, 2003
    • Economic Trends
      • Teens Hit Hard by Poor Economy
        • Table Mean and Aggregate Income of 15- to 17-Year-Olds, 2000-2003
      • Economic Slump Cuts Youth Employment
      • Older Youth Less Affected by Economic Downturn
        • Table Mean and Aggregate Income of 18- to 24-Year-Olds, 2000-2003
        • Table Trends in Economic Status of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2000 vs. 2003
      • Latino Youth Fare Better
        • Table Aggregate Income of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2003
        • Table Trends in Economic Status of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Race and Hispanic Origin
    • School Enrollment
      • Higher Education Remains Elusive Goal for Most Youths
        • Table School Enrollment of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, Full-Time vs. Part-Time, October 2003 (in thousands)
        • Table College Enrollment of 18- to 24-Year-Olds, by Attendance Status and Type of Institution, October 2003 (in thousands)
      • Community Colleges Maintain Role
        • Table 18- to 24-Year-Old College Students, 4-Year vs. 2-Year Institutions, October 2003 (in thousands)
  • Family, Friends, and Roommates
    • Teens and Their Families and Friends
      • Most Teens Still Live with Parents
        • Table Living Arrangements of 15- to 17-Year-Olds, 2003 (in thousands)
      • Most Teens Are Comfortable with Their Families
        • Table 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Views of Their Family by Gender and Race and Hispanic Origin
      • Most Get Along with Their Parents
        • Table 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Views of Parents by Gender and Race and Hispanic Origin
      • Boys Place a Higher Value on Friends
        • Table The Importance of Friends, 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender and Race and Hispanic Origin
    • Living Arrangements of 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Most Youths in Early 20s Are on Their Own
        • Table Living Arrangements of 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2003 (in thousands)
      • Living in Parents' Home Now Less Common
        • Table Percent of 18- to 24-Year-Olds Living with Their Parents, 1990-2003
      • Many Young Women Have Own Families
        • Table Living Arrangements of 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender, 2003 (in thousands)
      • Young Women More Likely to Marry
        • Table Marital Status of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2003 (in thousands)
        • Table Marital Status of 20- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender, 2003 (in thousands)
      • Many Young Women Are Mothers
        • Table Number of 15- to 24-Year-Old Women Who Have Ever Had a Child, by Marital Status, 2002 (in thousands)
        • Table Percent of 15- to 24-Year-Old Women Who Have Ever Had a Child, by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2000 (in thousands)
  • Consumer Behavior
    • Profile of Under-25 Consumer Units
      • Consumer Units Defined
      • Under-25 Consumer Differs from Average Consumer
        • Table Characteristics of Consumer Units, Under-25 vs. All Consumer Units, 2003-2004
      • Young Single Consumers Better Educated than Other Under-25 Consumers
        • Table Characteristics of Under-25 Consumer Units, Single vs. Others, 2003-2004
    • Consumer Expenditure Patterns
      • Differences in Consumer Expenditures Analyzed
        • Table Analysis of Consumer Expenditures of Under-25 Households
      • Single Young Men Spend More on Eating Out
        • Table Selected Expenditures of Single Male Consumer Units, Under-25 vs. All Single Male Consumer Units, 2003-2004
      • Young Single Women Place High Priority on Clothes
        • Table Selected Expenditures of Single Female Consumer Units, Under-25 vs. All Single Female Consumer Units, 2003-2004
  • Highlights of Consumer Behavior
    • Shopping Behavior
      • Young Women Shop More and Like It More than the Average U.S. Woman
        • Table Young Consumers' Attitudes toward the Importance of Shopping, by Gender
      • Gender Differences in Shopping Habits Formed during Teen Years
      • Young Men More Interested in Shopping than Average U.S. Male
        • Table In-Store Shopping Behavior of Young Consumers, by Gender
      • Price Sensitivity on the Rise
        • Table Price Sensitivity of Young Consumers, 2002 vs. 2004
      • Young Male Consumers More Brand Loyal
        • Table Brand Loyalty of Young Consumers, by Gender
      • Brand Attachments Forming Earlier than Before
      • Attitudes toward Shopping Formed in Teen Years
        • Table Attitudes toward Shopping as a Social Experience, by Gender
        • Table Shopping Patterns of 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Friends' Opinions Major Factor in Buying Decisions of Teens
    • Fashion
      • Interest in Fashion Declines with Age
      • Celebrities' Influence on Fashion Choices of Young Women Grows Stronger
      • Fashion Magazines Also Important
      • Many Young Consumers Have Conservative Tastes
        • Table Young Consumers' Attitudes toward Fashion and Style, by Gender
      • New Clothes a High Priority for Young Consumers
        • Table Young Consumers' Attitudes toward Buying Clothes by Gender
      • Most Teens Cautious about Standing Out in a Crowd
        • Table Attitudes toward Fashion of 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Teen Boys More Confident in Their Looks
        • Table Attitudes toward Appearance of 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
    • Food
      • Calorie Counting Not an Issue for 18- to 24-Year-Olds
        • Table Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Fattening Foods by Gender
        • Table Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Dieting by Gender
      • Teen Girls More Concerned about Dieting
        • Table 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Attitudes toward Dieting by Gender
      • Healthy Eating Has Lower Priority
        • Table Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Healthy Eating by Gender
        • Table 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Attitudes toward Healthy Eating by Gender
      • But Vegetarians More Common in Youth Market
      • Healthy Snack Foods Not an Issue
        • Table Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Snack Foods by Gender
      • Frozen Dinners and Pre-Cooked Meals Get Nod from Young Consumers
        • Table Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Frozen and Store-Made Dinners by Gender
      • Young Consumers More Adventurous In Food Choices
        • Table Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Food Styles by Gender
        • Table Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Trying New Foods by Gender
      • Teen Boys Least Worried about Fast Food
        • Table 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Attitudes toward Eating Out and Fast Food by Gender
    • Personal Finances
      • Young Consumers Financially Insecure
      • Teens More Conservative with Finances
        • Table Selected Attitudes toward Personal Finances of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • Young Consumers Lack Confidence in Financial Management Skills
        • Table Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Financial Management Skills by Gender
      • Young Consumers Less Afraid of Stock Market
      • Teens Distrust Credit Cards
        • Table 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Attitudes toward Credit Cards by Gender
      • Many Teens Tend to Be Savers
        • Table 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Attitudes toward Saving by Gender
      • Savings Accounts Common
        • Table Percent of 15- to 17-Year-Olds with Bank Accounts by Gender
      • Young Consumers Use ATM Cards More
      • Checking Accounts Rare
        • Table Use of Banking Services by 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender
  • Impact of Technology and the Internet on the Youth Market
    • The Rise of Mobile Media Platforms
      • Teens' Ownership of Cell Phones Explodes
      • Cell Phone Use by 18- to 24-Year-Olds Also High
      • Text Messaging and Other Data Services Take Off in Youth Market
      • Surveys Show Above-Average Use of Data Services by Young Cell Phone Subscribers
      • Youths More Likely to Subscribe to Ancillary Cell Phone Services
        • Table Cell Phone Services Used by 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Portable Digital Audio Players Take Hold in Youth Market
    • Youth and the Internet
      • Personal Computers Now in Nearly All Teens' Homes
        • Table Household Ownership of Computers, 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • Young Women More Likely to Own Personal Computer
        • Table Ownership of Home Computers by 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Demographic Characteristic
      • Teens Use the Internet the Most
        • Table Use of the Internet by 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • Teens' Lives Transformed Most by the Internet
        • Table Impact of Internet on Lifestyles of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • Popular Web Sites Listed
        • Table Web Sites Popular with 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
        • Table Web Sites Popular with 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Online Activities Analyzed
        • Table Online Activities of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • Older Youths More Likely to Buy Online
        • Table Internet Orders by 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
  • Media Usage and Entertainment Choices
    • Overview
      • Internet Continues to Affect Media Usage of Youth
        • Table Impact of Internet on Media Usage and Entertainment Habits of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • Teens More Likely to Rely on Internet for Entertainment
      • Teens Turn to Internet for Music and Sports, Older Youth for News and Information
        • Table Online Media Usage of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
    • Print Media
      • Young Consumers Look to Magazines More than Newspapers
        • Table Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Newspapers and Magazines by Gender
      • Leading Teen Magazines Listed
        • Table Magazines Popular with to 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Magazines for Teen Girls Experience Declines
      • Magazine Choices of 18- to 24-Year-Olds Show Broad Interests
        • Table Magazines Popular with 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender
    • Television
      • Older Teens Grow More Negative toward TV
      • 18- to 24-Year-Olds Less Involved with Television
        • Table Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Television by Gender
      • Young Viewers Interested in Video on Demand
        • Table Type of Cable Service Used by 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • MTV Tops Teen TV Choices
        • Table Cable TV Services Watched in Last 7 Days by 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
        • Table Cable TV Services on Top-25 Lists of Both 15- to 17-Year-Old Boys and Girls
      • MTV Also Top Choice of 18- to 24-Year-Olds
        • Table Cable TV Services Watched in Last 7 Days by 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Many TV Favorites Cross Age Boundaries in Youth Market
        • Table Cable TV Services on Top-20 Lists of Both 15- to 17-Year-Olds and 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Fox and NBC Favored by Young Viewers
        • Table Broadcast Networks Viewed by 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • Clear Gender Differences in Program Preferences
        • Table TV Show Types Viewed by 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
    • Radio
      • Radio Gets Less Attention from 18- to 24-Year-Olds
        • Table Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Radio, by Gender
      • Top Radio Formats Listed
        • Table Radio Formats Popular with 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
        • Table Radio Formats Popular with 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Portable Digital Audio Players Seen as Threat to Traditional Radio
    • Entertainment Choices
      • Hanging Out with Friends Matters Most to Teens
        • Table 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Attitudes toward Free Time by Gender
      • Teens Prefer Computers to Books
        • Table Attitudes toward Books and Reading of 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Sports Still Important to Teens
        • Table 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Attitudes toward Sports by Gender
      • Teen Girls Lead in Movie Attendance
        • Table Movie Attendance by 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • TV Commercials Drive Movie Choices
        • Table Reasons for Seeing Last Movie, 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Live Events Important Entertainment Option for 18- to 24-Year- Olds
        • Table Attendance at Live Entertainment Events by 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Teen Girls Focus More on Music
        • Table Attitudes toward Music of 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
        • Table Music Types Bought by 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Video Games Lose Favor as Teens Get Older
        • Table Frequency of Use of Video Games by 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Online Games Popular among Young Women
        • Table Use of Video Games by 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
  • The College Segment
    • Overview
      • Full-Time Four-Year Enrollment Tops 6.8 Million
        • Table Enrollment in Degree-Granting Institutions by 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2- Year vs. 4-Year Institutions, 2003 (in thousands)
        • Table Full-Time Enrollment in Degree-Granting Institutions by 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, Undergraduate vs. Graduate Levels 2003 (in thousands)
      • Women Predominate on College Campuses
        • Table Men and Women as Percent of Full-time Enrollment by 18- to 24-Year-Olds in Degree- Granting Institutions (in thousands)
      • Minorities Remain Underrepresented on College Campuses
        • Table Full-Time Enrollment in Degree-Granting Institutions by 18- to 24-Year-Olds, by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2003 (in thousands)
        • Table Race and Hispanic Origin of 18- to 24-Year-Old Full-time Students in Degree-Granting Institutions vs. Race and Hispanic Origin of All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Nearly 50% of Full-Time College Students Have Jobs
        • Table Employment of Full-Time 18- to 24-Year-Old College Students by Age Group, 2003 (in thousands)
        • Table Employment of Full-Time 18- to 24-Year-Old Male College Students by Age Group, 2003 (in thousands)
        • Table Employment of Full-Time 18- to 24-Year-Old Female College Students by Age Group, 2003 (in thousands)
    • Technology and the Student Consumer
      • College Students Most Likely to Own Cell Phones
      • Text Messaging More Common on Campuses
      • Computers Most Likely to Be Found in Dorm Rooms and Apartments of College Students
      • Nearly All College Students Online
        • Table Use of the Internet, 18- to 24-Year-Old Full-Time College Students vs. All 18- to 24- Year-Olds
      • Lives of College Students Most Affected by the Internet
        • Table Impact of Internet on Lifestyles, 18- to 24-Year-Old Full-Time College Students vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Top Web Destinations Listed
        • Table Popular Web Sites, 18- to 24-Year-Old Full-Time College Students vs. All 18- to 24- Year-Olds
      • Online Banking Popular with College Students
        • Table Online Activities, 18- to 24-Year-Old Full-Time College Students vs. All 18- to 24-Year- Olds
      • Female College Students More Likely to Buy Online
        • Table Internet Orders, 18- to 24-Year-Old Full-Time College Students vs. All 18- to 24-Year- Olds
    • Trends in Media Usage and Entertainment
      • Media Habits of College Men Most Affected by Internet
        • Table Impact of Internet on Media Usage Habits, 18- to 24-Year-Old Full-Time College Students vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Study Shows Substantial Out-of-Home TV Watching by College Men
      • MTV Expands to College Market
      • New Magazines Hope to Capture Attention of College Students
      • Data Show Average Use of Internet for Entertainment
      • Downloading Music Major Pastime for Students
      • Portable Digital Audio Players Part of the Campus Scene
    • Selected Market Trends
      • Research on Student Brand Loyalty Differs
      • Survey Research Continues to Show Substantial Buying Power for College Students
      • Savvy Retailers Prosper by Creating Annual "Back-to-College" Buying Event
      • Event-Based Campaigns Remain in Favor
  • The Multicultural Urban Youth Segment
    • Introduction
      • Background
      • Multicultural Urban Youth Segment Defined
    • Media and Entertainment Trends
      • Mobile Media Capabilities Less Common among Young Multicultural Males
        • Table Cell Phone Ownership and Use, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
        • Table Cell Phone Ownership and Use, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17-Year-Olds
      • Urban Teens Less Likely to Have Home Internet Access
        • Table Use of the Internet, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17-Year-Olds
      • Internet Affects Multicultural Media Habits
        • Table Impact of Internet on Media Usage, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year- Olds
      • Young Multicultural Consumers Like Magazines
        • Table Attitudes toward Magazines, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Urban Youth Less Likely to Multitask When Watching Television
        • Table Attitudes toward Television, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Top TV Network Choices Listed
        • Table Leading Television Broadcasting Networks, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24- Year-Olds
        • Table Broadcast Networks Viewed, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17- Year-Olds
      • Gender Gap Revealed in Radio Listening
        • Table Attitudes toward Radio, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Choices of Radio Formats Reveal Cultural Differences
        • Table Leading Radio Formats, Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
    • Opening Weekend Favored by Young Moviegoers
      • Table Movie Attendance, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Table Movie Attendance, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17-Year-Olds
    • Urban Youth Less Likely to Play Video Games
    • Young Urban Males Likely to Have Portable Digital Audio Players
    • Urban Teens More Aware of Top 10 Music Hits
      • Table Attitudes toward Music, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17-Year- Olds
  • Highlights of Consumer Attitudes and Behavior
    • Urban Youth More Receptive to Advertising
      • Table Receptivity to Advertising, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Table Attitudes toward Television Advertising, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24- Year-Olds
    • Multicultural Urban Youth Trendsetters Analyzed
      • Table Trendsetting Attitudes, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
    • Urban Teens Less Focused on Fashion
      • Table Attitudes toward Fashion, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17- Year-Olds
    • Multicultural Urban Youth More Interested in Trying New Foods
      • Table Attitudes toward Trying New Foods, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year- Olds
    • Urban Youth Gravitate to Fast Food
      • Table Attitudes toward Eating Out and Fast Food, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17-Year-Olds
      • Table Attitudes toward Fast Foods, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
    • Fattening Foods Concern Young Multicultural Urban Males
      • Table Attitudes toward Fattening Foods, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
    • Dieting More Common
      • Table Attitudes toward Dieting, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17-Year- Olds
      • Table Attitudes toward Dieting, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Table Attitudes toward Healthy Eating, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
  • Trends in the Urban Youth Market
    • Urban Apparel Brands Hit Speed Bump
    • Hip-Hop Magazine Faces Challenge
    • Tried-and-True Urban Marketing Techniques Still Used
    • Pepsi Looks to DJs to Promote Brand
    • New Product Launches Seek to Affiliate with Hip-Hop Culture
  • Market Trends
    • Size and Growth of the Market
      • Scope of Youth Market Defined
      • Expenditures Outpace Incomes
        • Table Expenditures of Under-25 Consumer Units as Percent of Before-Tax Income, by Marital Status, 2003
      • Expenditures of 15- to 24-Year-Olds Total $485 Billion
        • Table Expenditures of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2004
      • Young Women Spend Nearly as Much as Young Men
        • Table Expenditures of 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender, 2004
      • Family Expenditures on 15- to 17-Year-Olds Are Major Factor in Youth Market
        • Table Aggregate Annual Family Expenditures on 15-to 17-Year-Olds for Selected Consumer Products, 2004
      • Under-25 Consumer Units Play Important Role in Consumer Spending
        • Table Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Under-25 Consumer Units for Food and Beverages, 2003 (in millions)
        • Table Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Under-25 Consumer Units for Household Furnishings and Equipment, 2003 (in millions)
        • Table Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Under-25 Consumer Units for Apparel, 2003 (in millions)
        • Table Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Under-25 Consumer Units for Transportation, 2003 (in millions)
        • Table Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Under-25 Consumer Units for Entertainment, 2003 (in millions)
        • Table Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Under-25 Consumer Units for Personal-Care Products and Services, Reading Materials, and Education, 2003 (in millions)
    • Growth of the Youth Market
      • Slow Growth Likely
      • Youth Market Will Total $555 Billion in 2009
        • Table Projected Growth in Expenditures by 15- to 17-Year-Olds, 2004-2009
        • Table Projected Growth in Buying Power of 18- to 24-Year-Olds, 2004-2009
        • Table Projected Growth in Buying Power of 15- to 24-Year-Olds, 2002-2007
  • Marketing and Advertising Trends
    • Receptivity to Advertising
      • Few Teens Swayed by Advertising
        • Table Attitudes of 15- to 17-Year-Olds toward Advertising by Gender
      • Older Youths Less Negative toward Ads
        • Table Receptivity of 18- to 24-Year-Olds to Advertising, by Gender
      • Advertising in Movie Theatres Works Well in Youth Market
        • Table Receptivity of 15- to 24-Year-Olds to Advertising in Movie Theatres by Age Group and Gender
      • Young Males Prime Targets for TV Commercials
        • Table Fast Forwarding on VCRs by 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
        • Table Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Television Ads, by Gender
      • Young Women Drawn to Magazine Ads
        • Table Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Print Advertising, by Gender
      • Teens Most Likely to Disparage Online Advertising Techniques
        • Table Percent of 15- to 24-Year-Olds Viewing Internet Advertising as "Not at All Useful," by Type of Ad
    • Emerging Marketing Strategies and Advertising Platforms
      • "Third-Screen" Marketing Reaches Critical Mass
      • "American Idol" Promotion Seals Deal for Mobile Marketers
      • New Hand-Held Media Devices May Capture Advertisers' Attention
      • Opinions Differ on Effectiveness of Stand-Alone Mobile Advertising
      • Integrated "Three-Screen" Marketing Approach Seen as More Effective
      • Video Games Seen as Underutilized Advertising Platform
      • More Advertisers Turn to In-Game Advertising
      • Gamers Get to Order Pizza Online
    • Examples of Marketing and Advertising Approaches
      • Frito-Lay Reaches Out to Young People with Text Messaging
      • Burger King Appeals to Young Men with Big Appetites
      • McDonalds Shifts Focus to Young Adults
      • Reebok Experiments with Video-on-Demand
  • Trends and Opportunities
    • Key Market Trends Summarized
      • Table Key Trends Shaping the Youth Market, 2005-2010
    • Today's Youth Market Reveals the Future for Marketers
    • Young Consumers Lead Mobile Media Revolution
    • Technology Trumps Traditional Teen Choices
    • Economic Trends and Boomer Parents behind Delayed Adulthood
    • Female Gamers and Techies Deserve Marketers' Attention
    • Opportunities Come and Go with Constant State of Flux in Youth Market
    • Marketers Need to Track Shifting Consumer Attitudes and Behavior
    • Food Marketers Face Complex and Conflicted Consumers in Youth Market

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