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Wellness Ingredients: Culinary Trend Mapping Report

Long before today’s pharmaceutical industry, civilizations treated illness with diets meant to balance one’s humors (Greeks), yin and yang (Chinese) or doshas (Ayurveda). Whatever the bodily ailment or concern, food in the form of herbs, spices, barks, teas, soups and what-have you was administered to make a body better. This age-old notion is regaining traction, and represents a growing trend in the American health and wellness arena today.

Consumers are more engaged than ever trying out new foods and diets in hopes of curing what ails them or preventing ailments to which they are susceptible. Consumers’ participation in uncovering and treating various conditions with food is part of this era’s DIY-care mentality. Hobbled with healthcare issues and economic woes, while simultaneously emboldened by innumerable Internet pages and a growing understanding and acceptance of alternative medical systems —Traditional Chinese Medicine with its acupuncture, holistic medicine and its tinctures, naturopathy and even yoga—consumers have never had more motivation or ammunition for finding new cures themselves, especially diet-related ones.

The wellness ingredients profiled in this report all have this ancient medicinal wisdom element in common. These ingredients have been consumed for healthfulness by cultures around the world for centuries, and are finding new life today in natural food stores as well as the natural food aisles in mainstream grocery stores.

  • Stage 1: Healing Spices — Holy basil and turmeric are two Ayurvedic staples situated at Stage 1 but gaining momentum in the health food world as functional ingredients with therapeutic properties. Boasting digestive and mental health benefits, these spices are being incorporated into teas, nut butters and energy bars.
  • Stage 2: Hemp — Although industrial hemp production remains illegal in much of the U.S., the market for hemp products is flourishing. Hemp seed is the edible part of the hemp plant, and it packs quite a nutritional punch. No wonder it’s become a healthful booster to everything from nut bars to milk to salad dressing.
  • Stage 2: The New (Old) Fermented Foods — Fermented foods like miso, kasu, tempeh and pu-erh tea are rapidly gaining adherents as consumers seek out foods that are less processed and more nutrient-rich. Benefits range from an ability to improve digestion to naturally high protein content, and these imported superfoods can enhance taste, too.
  • Stage 2: Sprouted Foods — Health-focused manufacturers are sprouting wheat, rice and other grains, nuts and seeds and using them as a base for wholesome grain goods that offer more nutrition and are more digestible than similar products made without sprouted grains.
  • Stage 3: Grass-fed Meat & Dairy — Grass-fed Meat & Dairy has an impressive health halo as well as an improved reputation for taste. It also feeds into consumers’ desires for more authentically good-for-you products, those our grandparents and great-grandparents relied on.
  • Stage 3: Agave Nectar — Agave nectar fits well with consumer desires for a more healthful plant-based sweetener. Its lower-than-white sugar glycemic index means it helps maintain even blood sugar levels, and because it is sweeter than sugar, consumers can use less of it, making it a good value.
  • Stage 5: DHA — Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) may be the hottest long-chain fatty acid you can’t pronounce. DHA is a source of Omega-3 that is being promoted for its ability to enhance brain function and development.

• • • • •

The Culinary Trend Mapping Report is an indispensable tool for those whose job it is to stay abreast of what's hot - and what will be - in the food world.

The reports leverage the Center for Culinary Development’s (CCD) signature Trend Mapping technique, a validated method for identifying which culinary trends are gaining traction and which are simply flashes in the pan.

Each 65+ page journal is packed with trends, data, strategies and insights on the food industry that simply aren't available anywhere else.

Each Issue of the Culinary Trends Mapping Report

  • Identifies the maturity level of foods and ingredients according to CCD’s unique, proprietary 5-stage trend mapping process.
  • Concentrates on a theme that is affecting the food industry, and then looks at the emerging and established trends along the Trend Map that are shaping this theme.
  • Delves into these trends and what they mean for you and the manufacturing, retailing, and foodservice industries.
  • Gives strategic insight into how consumers are thinking of and reacting to new foods and ingredients.
  • Provides business know-how regarding opportunities, challenges, and ways to implement current trends into foodservice, retail, and packaged goods operations.
  • Presents a feature interview with a member chef from CCD’s exclusive 80+ member Chefs’ Council who offers expert analysis and unique perspective on a specific trend.
Trend Mapping

Trend Mapping is guided by the premise that major food trends pass through five distinct stages on their way to the mainstream:

  • Stage 1: The ingredient, dish and/or cooking technique appears at upscale dining establishments, ethnic and popular independent restaurants.
  • Stage 2: The item is featured in specialty consumer-oriented food magazines such as Bon Appetit plus retail stores such as Sur La Table that target culinary professionals and serious home cooks.
  • Stage 3: The item begins to appear in mainstream chain restaurants—Applebee's or Chili's—as well as retail stores such as Williams-Sonoma that target recreational cooks.
  • Stage 4: Publications such as Family Circle and Better Homes and Gardens pick up the buzz.
  • Stage 5: Finally, the trend makes its way to quick service restaurant menus and either starts to appear or gains increased mainstream presence on grocery store shelves.
Availability

Published bimonthly, the Culinary Trend Mapping Report is available for purchase as a single issue or a six-issue subscription.


Market Insights: A Selection From The Report


Ayurveda in brief

More than 5,000 years ago, an Indian sage named Srila Vyasadeva wrote the Vedas, a series of
manuscripts that became the basis for Ayurvedic medicine. This ancient Hindu philosophy takes
a holistic approach to health, emphasizing the importance of treating an individual as a complete
person rather than a series of symptoms or conditions. “Ayurveda” means “life knowledge” or
“the science of life” in ancient Sanskrit.

In today’s DIY-oriented health world, Ayurvedic medicine aligns well with current wellness
trends. It places personal responsibility front and center, holding individuals—not their doctors or
pharmacists—accountable for their own health. This sense of personal responsibility is paramount
because, like the Chinese philosophy behind acupuncture, Ayurveda sees each person as unique.
This perspective appeals to the individualistic American consumer, who believes in the benefit of
seeking out foods that align with his/her particular appetite, food norms, constitution, and health needs.

Drink your hemp

Hemp milk has been on the market for the last three to four years, made by health-oriented brands like Living
Harvest, Pacific and Manitoba Harvest, which put out Hemp Bliss in April 2007. Canadian-based Manitoba
Harvest, which also sells Shelled Hemp Seed, Hemp Seed Butter and Hemp Protein Powder in Chocolate and
Vanilla flavors (as well as a number of hemp oils and seeds in both regular and certified organic varieties), has
fueled the growing interest in hemp: Its sales have grown...

Tempting tempeh

Tofu is old news, a vegetarian and vegan staple food that first gained popularity stateside in the 1960s when the counterculture pushed meat-free eating to the forefront. But tempeh, its fermented soy cousin, is less well known, despite centuries of use in Indonesia. Made with whole soybeans that are soaked, dehulled and then partially cooked with a mold culture, tempeh is then fermented for roughly 24 to 36 hours. The result: a high protein, low carbs product that can be used in sandwiches, stir-fries or even in the center of the plate after being sautéed, grated, stewed or even baked.

In the News

Wellness Ingredients Emerge from the Past to Find New Life in the Modern Culinary World

New York, January 18, 2011 —Revitalizing one’s physical wellbeing through diet rather than doctor prescribed medications or supplements has pushed foods fortified with health boosting properties to the forefront of consumer culinary demands, according to the Wellness Ingredients: Culinary Trend Mapping Report from the Center for Culinary Development (CCD) and leading market research publisher Packaged Facts.

Consumers are looking backwards for these cures, beyond our recent industrial era to times long past when healing was more organic and food-based, rooted in real foodstuffs shaped by centuries of tradition and attention to wellness. This interest in pre-industrial nutritional healing is also driven by a quest for authentic products, for whole foods and for traditional food preparation methods.
"American consumers are more engaged than ever in managing their health through food in hopes of curing what ails them or preventing ailments to which they are susceptible," says Kimberly Egan, CEO of CCD. "Many of these curative foods have roots in ancient times, and have been consumed by cultures around the world for centuries."

The good news for product development is that many of these ingredients can be creatively utilized in new exciting products to add to health halos and give a nutritional boost that consumers crave. CCD profiles seven hot wellness ingredient trends using its proprietary Trend Mapping® methodology:

  • Stage 1: Healing Spices — Boasting digestive and mental health benefits, healing spices-such as holy basil and turmeric, both staples of the ancient Hindu philosophy of Ayurvedic medicine-are being incorporated into teas, nut butters and energy bars.

  • Stage 2: Hemp — Hemp seed is the edible part of the hemp plant, and it packs quite a nutritional punch. As a great source of Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs), it has a perfect 3:1 ratio of Omega-6 Linolenic Acid and Omega-3 Linolenic Acid, both of which are known for strengthening the immune system, bettering cognitive function and promoting healthy skin, hair and eyes.

  • Stage 2: The New (Old) Fermented Foods — Fermented foods like miso, kasu, tempeh and pu-erh tea have long been trusted in Asia for their healthful properties and may soon follow in the footsteps of successful specialty fermented products like kombucha as consumers seek out foods that are less processed and more nutrient-rich.

  • Stage 2: Sprouted Foods — Health-focused manufacturers are sprouting wheat, rice and other grains, nuts and seeds and using them as a base for wholesome grain goods that offer more nutrition and are more digestible than similar products made without sprouted grains.

  • Stage 3: Grass-fed Meat & Dairy — Free of artificial hormones and containing higher levels of CLA (conjugated linoleic acid) and Omega-3 fatty acids, Grass-fed Meat & Dairy possess an impressive health halo as well as an improved reputation for taste. It also feeds into consumers’ desires for more authentically good-for-you products, those our ancestors relied on.

  • Stage 3: Agave Nectar —A syrup that can be easily added to products ranging from beverages to baked goods to sauces, agave nectar fits with consumer desires for a more healthful plant-based sweetener; its low glycemic-index is a plus as is its heritage in Mexican cuisine.

  • Stage 5: DHA — Whether highlighting where Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) naturally occurs-like fish-or adding it to products to give them a cognitive boosting edge, this source of good fats is a boon for CPG manufacturers looking to entice consumers on the lookout for functional foods that benefit the brain.

The Culinary Trend Mapping Report is co-published by the Center for Culinary Development and Packaged Facts.

About the Center for Culinary Development CCD is a full-service food and beverage strategic innovation company that successfully blends culinary creativity with consumer insights, trends and marketing expertise.

About Packaged Facts — Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, publishes market intelligence on a wide range of consumer market topics, including consumer goods and retailing, foods and beverages, demographics, pet products and services, and financial products. Packaged Facts also offers a full range of custom research services.

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In the News

What’s Cooking for 2011:
Adventurous Flavors & Wellness Foods Propel New Food & Beverage Trends

New York, January 6, 2011 — Burrowing out of the recession, hungry consumers will be exploring more exotic territory in the quest for unique flavors and nourishing foods in 2011. The Center for Culinary Development (CCD) and Packaged Facts, expert trend trackers, make their predictions on the food and beverage trends that will be buzz-generating this year.

Using CCD’s signature 5-stage Trend Mapping® technique-where Stage 1 trends are emerging from independent restaurants and Stage 5’s have landed in the mainstream-CCD and Packaged Facts have identified eight culinary trends that will be attracting adventurous diners and influencing product development this year. These trends will be profiled in 2011 issues of the bi-monthly Culinary Trend Mapping Report.

Douglas Fir and other "Wild by Nature" Flavors: Stage 1 — Fine dining chefs have a new source for ingredients: nature. They are finding new ingredients by foraging in forests and along seashores, seeking new plants, herbs and flowers to flavor creative dishes and add a touch of the wild. Mixologists will join in the fun adding "wild" flavors at the bar.

Cloudberry: Stage 1 — This alpine and arctic berry is an element of trendy Nordic cuisine. Traditionally made into jams and liqueurs, it’ now appearing in beer, wine and sparkling drinks. Could this be the next elderberry for the beverage world?

Arepas: Stage 1 — This South American griddled cornmeal patty is both tasty and versatile, such that areperias have already spread across Latin America and areas in the U.S. with Colombian and Venezuelan immigrants. One San Francisco-based Venezuelan restaurateur has already turned arepas into trendy sandwich carriers for local foodies, and we expect to see them spread to many more urban areas considering they are filling, delicious, vegetarian-friendly and gluten-free.

Yuzu and Exotic Citrus: Stage 2 — We have been spotting new foods made with the floral-flavored Japanese lime at Fancy Food Shows lately and believe this trend is ready to blossom. With lime already such a flavor standard, yuzu and other more specialty citrus varieties like sudachi will offer consumers an exciting exotic twist for salad dressings, beverages and condiments.

Coconut Oil: Stage 2 — The word is spreading about the many health benefits of coconut oil. It has a positive effect on metabolism due to its medium-chain fatty acid structure and also is a great substitute for butter for dairy-free baking and cooking. The fact that it makes stir-fried greens taste great seals the deal.

Popovers & Gougéres: Stage 2 — American consumers are ready for new savory baked goods to freshen up the breadbasket. The traditional airy popover and cheesy French cream puff are well positioned to do just that, being versatile, pop-able and novel.

Grass-fed Dairy: Stage 3 — Free of artificial hormones and containing higher levels of healthful fatty acids, products made from grass-fed dairy appeal to both health-focused consumers and those seeking more natural, traditional and authentic foodstuffs.

Umami: Stage 3 — American consumers are becoming more sophisticated about great tastes that come from umami, the fifth flavor found in many fermented and aged products, as well as seaweed, meat stock, parmesan cheese and tomatoes. Expect to see more applications of umami-laden ingredients—soy sauce, fish sauce, dashi, mushroom broths —in 2011.

Overarching interest in Flavor Adventure and Wellness is driving food and flavor trends this year, illustrating how worldly our palates are becoming and how good-for-you foods can also be delicious and a little exotic. Look for our upcoming 2011 Culinary Trend Mapping Reports on Extreme & Edgy Flavors, Baked Goods, Condiments & Sauces, New Old-World Cuisine and Fats & Oils.

The Culinary Trend Mapping Report is co-published by the Center for Culinary Development and Packaged Facts.

About the Center for Culinary Development — CCD is a full-service food and beverage strategic innovation company that successfully blends culinary creativity with consumer insights, trends and marketing expertise.

About Packaged Facts — Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, publishes market intelligence on a wide range of consumer market topics, including consumer goods and retailing, foods and beverages, demographics, pet products and services, and financial products. Packaged Facts also offers a full range of custom research services.

Executive Overview
Why Wellness Ingredients? - Kimberly Egan
Executive Summary
Trend Summary
Stage 1 - Healing Spices
Stage 2 - Hemp
- The New (Old) Fermented Foods
- Sprouted Foods
Stage 3 - Grass-fed Meat & Dairy
- Agave Nectar
Stage 5 - DHA
Chef Speak: CCD Chefs’ Council® Voices
Nam Singh: Finding a Healthful Balance
Strategic Implications
Opportunities for Wellness Ingredients
Sources
Source List

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