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The U.S. Teens Market: Understanding the Changing Lifestyles and Trends of 12- to 19- Year Olds

This Packaged Facts report provides a comprehensive assessment of the teen market, which includes more than 32 million Americans ages 12 to 19. The report begins by highlighting key aspects of the teen population, such as projected population growth, race and ethnicity, and employment and income patterns. Trends in the teen market are identified and teen buying power is estimated. The report presents an analysis of the consumer behavior of teens, including their impact on family buying decisions, and offers a review of leading teen media. Marketing, promotional, and advertising strategies used in the teen market are analyzed, and companies focusing on the teen market are profiled. Appendices include information about resources available to companies interested in the teen market and examples of advertisements targeting the market.

Teens represent one of the fastest-growing population segments, with the teen population registering a growth of 16.6% between 1990 and 2000. Teens wield significant buying power—both in their own right and in the context of their family purchasing decisions—that is increasingly targeted by marketers seeking to execute successful growth strategies. However, today’s teens are more media-sensitive and marketing-savvy than any of their predecessor generations and require a highly sophisticated marketing approach.

Understand how Generation Y attitudes affect teen consumer behavior. Learn how to get the attention of teen consumers. Identify population trends affecting the teen market of the future. See how marketers are using alternative promotional techniques, such as viral marketing campaigns and street marketing activities, to reach teen consumers. Find out about the rapidly changing landscape of teen-oriented media.


Press Release

By 2006, U.S. Teens Can Buy and Sell Russia

New York, July 22/PRNewswire - By 2006, 12- to 19-year-olds in the United States are projected to have a buying power that will top the $182 billion gross domestic product of Russia. The U.S. Teens Market, a new report from Packaged Facts available at MarketResearch.com, estimates that the buying power of teens will reach $190 billion, increasing a staggering 27.7% between 2001 and 2006 due to higher earnings from jobs held by teens, as well as a jump in family expenditures on teens.

“Teens are increasingly in control of purchasing decisions, both for themselves and within families,” said Don Montuori, Acquisitions Editor of Packaged Facts. “Since 1999 we have seen jumps in the economic influence of teens’ preferences in almost every product area, including clothing, personal care items, technology and entertainment.”

As the buying power of teens increases, the percentage of teens that come from multicultural backgrounds is also projected to grow. According to The U.S. Teens Market, by 2006 non-Hispanic Whites will only account for 60% of the total teens population and the Hispanic population will constitute the largest minority group. Not surprisingly, an increasingly diverse and wealthy population of teens has caught the attention of marketers who are quickly moving to position their products as appealing to a multicultural audience.

The U.S. Teens Market delivers analysis of the evolving structure of family environments, as well as an overview of the changing racial and ethnic composition of the teens population. Also included is analysis of the consumer behavior of the teenage population and data regarding the shopping behavior and buying style of both teens and their families.

About Packaged Facts
Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, produces research reports on a wide range of consumer industries and demographics, covering the U.S. markets and including information on global market trends and opportunities. For more information visit www.PackagedFacts.com.

About MarketResearch.com
MarketResearch.com is the leading provider of global market intelligence products and services. With over 50,000 research publications from more than 350 top consulting and advisory firms, they offer instant online access to the world’s most extensive database of expert insights on global industries, companies, products, and trends. For more information, call Alison Williams at 212.807.2649 or visit www.MarketResearch.com.

I. Executive Summary

Introduction

  • Background
  • Overview of Report

Scope and Methodology

  • Teen Population Defined
  • Teen Market Measured in Several Ways
  • Methodology

Demographic Overview

  • Teen Population Tops 32 Million
  • Teen Population Includes Nearly 12 Million Multicultural Youths
  • Teen Population Will Become More Diverse
  • Two in Three Teens Live with Both Parents
  • Non-Hispanic White and Asian Teens More Likely to Live in Two-Parent Households
  • Suburban Teens Most Likely to Live with Both Parents
  • More than 2 Million Teens Live Independently
  • Number of Married Teens Tops Half Million
  • Number of Teen Mothers Approached 600,000 in 2000
  • School Remains Major Focus of Most Teens through Age 16
  • Teens Found from Elementary Schools to Colleges
  • Teen Income Comes from Many Sources
  • Teens Often Earn Money
  • Annual Earnings of Employed Teens Exceed $85 Billion
  • Teen Population Seen in Positive Light by U.S. Government
  • Listening to Music Favorite Teen Activity

Survey of the Market

  • Family Expenditures on Teens Reach $100 Billion
  • Older Teens Account for More Food Expenditures and Younger Teens Absorb Greater Share of Other Family Expenditures
  • Family Expenditures on Teens Will Exceed $128 Billion in 2006
  • Teen Buying Power Reaches $150 Billion
  • Buying Power of 12- to 14-Year-Olds Will Reach $30.8 Billion in 2006
  • Buying Power of 15- to 17-Year-Olds Will Show Highest Growth Rate
  • Buying Power of Older Teens Will Exceed $100 Billion in 2006
  • Teen Buying Power Will Show Increase of 27.7%

Consumer Behavior

  • Teens Influence Household Brand Choices
  • Teens Increase Control over Buying Decisions
  • Teens Visit Stores More than Other Shoppers
  • Convenience Stores Attract Teens
  • TV Most Influential Advertising Medium for Teens
  • Clothing and Accessories Top Teen Spending Choices
  • Online Teen Population Grows More than 50% in Four Years
  • Teens View Internet Primarily as Social Tool
  • Most Teens Use Internet to Research Purchases
  • Younger Teens Spend Proportionately More Online
  • Teens Quickest to Make First Online Purchase
  • Teens Embrace Wireless Technology

Media

  • Boys Absent from Teen Magazine Readership
  • Big 4 Magazines Dominate Teen Publishing
  • Teen Magazine Field Increasingly Competitive
  • Teens Watch Less TV than Adults
  • Cable Networks Top Teen Choices
  • Broadcast Networks Continue to Lose Teen Market Share
  • Broadcast Networks Search for Ways to Win Back Teen Viewers
  • Teens Turn On Radio
  • Teens Lead in Listening to Radio Online
  • Internet Voted Top Medium
  • Research Shows Teens on Cutting Edge of Media Convergence

Overview of Marketing, Promotional, and Advertising Strategies

  • Marketers Deal with the Paradoxes of Teen Consumers
  • Affiliating with Teen Subcultures Viewed as Vital
  • Grassroots Marketing Seen as Crucial in Teen Market
  • Online Promotion a Core Component of Integrated Teen Marketing Strategies
  • Viral Marketing Gains Support
  • Celebrities Still Seen as Important Part of Teen Marketing
  • Product Placement Effective Teen Marketing Tool
  • Many Ad Campaigns Reflect Desire of Teens to See Themselves in Ads

Case Studies of Companies Marketing to Teens

  • Quiksilver’s Roxy Brand Symbolizes Active Teen Girls Lifestyle
  • Abercrombie & Fitch Goes After Younger Crowd with Hollister
  • Target Turns its Attention to Teens
  • New Pepsi Flavors Target Teens
  • Slim Jim Speaks to Male Teens
  • P&G’s Cover Girl Focuses on Teen Girls
  • Direct Sellers of Beauty Products Develop Teen Strategies
  • Cingular Wireless Reaches Out to Teens

II. Demographic Overview

Market Definition

  • Teen Population Defined
  • Teen Market Measured in Two Ways

Size and Growth of the Teen Population

  • Teen Population Tops 32 Million
  • Table 2-1: Size of Teen Population: by Single Year of Age, 2000
  • Table 2-2: Population of 12- to 19-Year-Olds: by Age Group and Gender, 2000
  • Male Population Larger than Female
  • Table 2-3: Population by Gender: 12- to 19-Year-Olds vs. Other Age Groups, 2000
  • Growth in Teen Population Focused on Younger Age Segments
  • Table 2-4: Size and Growth of Population: 12- to 19-Year-Olds vs. Other Age Groups, 1990 vs. 2000
  • Table 2-5: Total U.S. and Teen Populations: Projected vs. Actual Census 2000 Counts
  • Teen Population Will Experience Above-Average Growth
  • Table 2-6: Projected Growth of Total U.S. and Teen Populations, 2000-2006
  • 15- to 17-Year-Old Population Will Show Fastest Growth
  • Table 2-7: Projected Growth of Teen Population: by Age Segment, 2000-2006

Geographic Distribution

  • South Has Largest Teen Population
  • Table 2-8: Population of 12- to 19-Year-Olds: by Region, 2000
  • Teen Population Concentrated in Key States
  • Table 2-9: Ranking of States: by Population of 12- to 19-Year-Olds vs. Total Population, 2000
  • Older Teen Population Is More Rural
  • Table 2-10: Population of 10- to 19-Year-Olds: by Location of Residence: Metropolitan vs. Non-Metropolitan, 2000

Race and Hispanic Origin

  • Teen Population Includes Nearly 12 Million Multicultural Youths
  • Table 2-11: Number of 12- to 19-Year-Olds: by Gender, Race, and Hispanic Origin, 2000
  • Teen Population More Diverse than U.S. Population as a Whole
  • Table 2-12: Number of 12- to 19-Year-Olds vs. Other Population Groups: by Gender, Race, and Hispanic Origin, 2000
  • Multicultural Teens Account for Most of the Growth in Teen Population
  • Table 2-13: Growth in Population of 12- to 19 Year-Olds: Non-Hispanic Whites vs. Other Population Groups, 1990-2000
  • Multicultural Youths Dominate Many Urban Markets
  • Table 2-14: Metropolitan Areas with Largest Populations of 15- to 19-Year-Olds: by Percent of Non-Whites in Population Under 18 Years, 2000
  • Many Teens Are Foreign-Born
  • Figure 2-1: Rate of Growth in Population of 12- to 19-Year-Olds: non-Hispanic Whites vs. Other Population Groups, 1990 vs. 2000
  • Table 2-15: Foreign-Born vs. Native-Born 10- to 19-Year-Olds: by Age Group, 2000
  • Most Foreign-Born Teens Come from Latin America
  • Table 2-16: Region of Birth of Foreign-Born 10- to 19-Year-Olds, 2000
  • Nearly 10 Million Young People Speak Foreign Language at Home
  • Table 2-17: Foreign Languages Spoken at Home by 5- to 17-Year-Olds, 2000
  • Most Multicultural Youths Have Strong English-Language Capabilities
  • Table 2-18: English-Language Capabilities of 5- to 17-Year-Olds Speaking Foreign Language at Home, 2000
  • But More Hispanic Youths Say They Prefer Spanish to English
  • Teen Population Will Become More Diverse
  • Table 2-19: Projected Number of 12- to 19-Year-Olds: by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2000 vs. 2006
  • Figure 2-2: Projected Growth in Teen Population: non-Hispanic Whites vs. Other Population Groups, 2000-2006
Family Structure and Living Arrangements
  • Two in Three Teens Live with Both Parents
  • Table 2-20: Living Arrangements of 12- to 17-Year-Olds: by Age Group, 2000
  • Black and Hispanic Teens Less Likely to Live in Two-Parent Households
  • Table 2-21: Living Arrangements of 12- to 17-Year-Olds: by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2000
  • Suburban Teens Most Likely to Live with Both Parents
  • Table 2-22: Living Arrangements of 12- to 17-Year-Olds: by Location of Residence, 2000
  • Parents of Teens Tend to Be in Their Forties
  • Table 2-23: Mean Age of Family Householders: by Age of Children, 2000
  • Table 2-24: Family Householders with Children Ages 12 to 17: by Age of Householder, 2000
  • More than 2 Million Teens Live Independently
  • Table 2-25: Family Status and Householder Relationship of 15- to 19-Year-Olds: by Age Group, 2000
  • Table 2-26: Number of 15- to 19-Year-Olds Living Independently: by Age Group, Family, and Household Status, 2000
  • Female Teens More Likely to Live Independently
  • Table 2-27: Family Status and Householder Relationship of 15- to 19-Year-Olds: by Gender, 2000
  • Number of Married Teens Tops Half Million
  • Table 2-28: Marital Status of 15- to 19-Year-Olds, 2000
  • Number of Teen Mothers Approached 600,000 in 2000
  • Table 2-29: Number of 15- to 19-Year-Old Women Who Have Had a Child in the Last Year, 1994, 1995, 1998, 2000
  • Most Teen Mothers Are Unmarried
  • Table 2-30: Number of 15- to 19-Year-Old Women Who Have Ever Had a Child: by Marital Status, 2000
  • Teen Marriages and Births Influenced by Numerous Factors
  • Table 2-31: Marital Status of 15- to 19-Year-Old Females: by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2000
  • Table 2-32: Distribution of 15- to 19-Year-Old Women: by Marital Class, Number of Children Ever Born, Age, Race, and Hispanic Origin,

School Enrollment

  • Teens Attend Many Types of Educational Institutions
  • School Remains Major Focus of Most Teens through Age 16
  • Table 2-33: School Enrollment of 12- to 19-Year-Olds: by Single Year of Age, October 2000
  • Teens Found from Elementary Schools to Colleges
  • Table 2-34: Grade of Enrollment of 12- to 19-Year-Olds: by Single Year of Age, October 2000
  • Most Teens Attend Public High Schools
  • Table 2-35: Enrollment of Private Secondary School Students: by Type of School, 1999-2000
  • More than 40% of 18- and 19-Year-Olds Are in College
  • Table 2-36: College Enrollment of 15- to 19-Year-Olds: by Age Group, October 2000
  • Gender Gap in College Enrollment of Older Teens
  • Figure 2-3: Percent of 18- and 19-Year-Olds Enrolled in College: Males vs. Females, October 2000

Employment and Economic Status

  • Teen Income Comes from Many Sources
  • Poll Reveals Teens Have Strong Interest in Summer Employment
  • Employment Trends among Young Teens Analyzed
  • Teen Employment Patterns Complex
  • Youngest Teens Often Earn Money
  • Table 2-37: Number of 12- and 13-Year-Olds Engaged in Paying Work: by Type of Work, 2001
  • More Job Opportunities Open When Teens Turn 14
  • Table 2-38: Number of 14-Year-Olds Engaged in Paying Work: by Type of Work, 2001
  • Young Teens Can Hold Wide Variety of Jobs
  • Table 2-39: Top 10 Occupations of 14- and 15-Year-Olds with Employee Jobs
  • Teen Employment Rate Increases Rapidly with Age
  • Table 2-40: Number of Employed 15- to 17-Year-Olds: by Single Year of Age, 2001
  • Gender Differences Seen in Employment Rates of Young Teens
  • Table 2-41: Number of 12- and 13-Year-Olds Engaged in Paying Work: by Gender and Type of Work, 2001
  • Table 2-42: Number of 14-Year-Olds Engaged in Paying Work: by Gender and Type of Work, 2001
  • Occupational Differences between Boys and Girls Appear Early in Teen Years
  • Table 2-43: Top 10 Occupations of 15-Year-Olds: by Gender
  • Poll Suggests Teen Girls Earn Less than Boys
  • Employment of Older Teens Affected by College Enrollment
  • Table 2-44: Employment Status of 18- and 19-Year-Olds: by Enrollment Status
  • Older Teens Balance School and Work
  • Table 2-45: Employment Status of Students Ages 15 to 19 Years, October 2000
  • Many Older Teens Are Employed
  • Table 2-46: Employment Status of Students Ages 15 to 19 Years, October 2000
  • Male Students More Likely to Work Full-Time
  • Table 2-47: Employment Status of Male Students Ages 15 to 19 Years, October2000
  • Table 2-48: Employment Status of Female Students Ages 15 to 19 Years, October 2000
  • Earnings of 12- to 14-Year-Olds Reach Nearly $10 Billion Annually
  • Table 2-49: Average Weekly Earnings of Employed 12- to 14-Year-Olds: by Single Year of Age, 2001
  • Table 2-50: Average Annual Earnings of Employed 12- to 14-Year-Olds: by Single Year of Age, 2001
  • Table 2-51: Aggregate Annual Earnings of Employed 12- to 14-Year-Olds: by Single Year of Age, 2001
  • Teens in 15- to 17-Year-Old Age Group Earn $18.1 Billion
  • Table 2-52: Average Weekly Earnings of Employed 15- to 17-Year-Olds: by Single Year of Age, 2001
  • Table 2-53: Average Annual Earnings of Employed 15- to 17-Year-Olds: by Single Year of Age, 2001
  • Table 2-54: Aggregate Annual Earnings of Employed 15- to 17-Year-Olds: by Single Year of Age, 2001
  • Oldest Teens Earn $57.8 Billion Annually
  • Table 2-55: Average Annual Earnings of Employed 18- and 19-Year-Olds, 2001
  • Many Teens Expected to Contribute to Back-to-School Purchases
  • Teen Allowances Create Substantial Buying Power
  • Families with Teens Share $1.4 Trillion Annual Income
  • Table 2-56: Aggregate Income of Families with Children Ages 6-17: by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2000

Indicators of Well-Being

  • Teen Population Seen in Positive Light by U.S. Government Study
  • Teens Share in Obesity Epidemic
  • Causes of Teen Overweight Documented
  • Figure 2-4: Percent of 12- to 19-Year-Olds Considered Overweight, Selected Years 1965-1999
  • Low Calcium Intake Seen in Teens
  • Physical Activity Declines as Teens Get Older
  • Teen Smoking Declines
  • Table 2-57: Percent of High School Students Who Reported Smoking Cigarettes, Selected Years, 1991-2001
  • Today’s Teens Less Likely to Use Alcohol than Their Parents at Same Age
  • Table 2-58: Percent of High School Seniors Reporting Alcohol Use: by Frequency of Use, 1975 to 2000
  • Overall Drug Use by High-School Seniors Shows Less Favorable Trend
  • Table 2-59: Percent of High School Seniors Reporting Use of Any Illicit Drug: by Frequency of Use, 1975 to 2000
  • But Marijuana and Ecstasy Use Reported Down
  • Level of Sexual Activity of Teens Seen Declining
  • Table 2-60: Sexual Behaviors of 9th- to 12th-Graders, Selected Years, 1991-1999 81
  • Teens Face High Risk of Contracting STDs
  • Table 2-61: Reported Rates of Chlamydia per 100,000 Population of 15- to 19- Year-Olds, 1996-2000
  • Incidence of STDs among Teens Population Shows Decline
  • Teen Birth Rate Is Lower
  • Figure 2-5: Birth Rates for 15- to 19-Year-Olds, 1991 vs. 2000

Attitudes and Issues

  • Survey Documents Top 10 Concerns of Teens
  • Teens and Parents Differ on Most Important Issues
  • Teens Place High Value on Volunteering
  • Religion Important to Many Teens

Teens’ Activities

  • Listening to Music Favorite Teen Activity
  • Maintaining Social Relationships Other Major Teen Activity
  • Teen Girls Read More than Boys
  • Teens Seek Afterschool Activities
  • Teen Participation in Team Sports Declines
  • Surfing the Web

III. Survey Of The Market

Overview of Key Market Segments

  • 12- to 14-Year-Olds: On the Outside Looking In
  • 15- to 17-Year-Olds: Teenagers to the Core
  • 18- and 19-Year-Olds: On the Cusp of Young Adulthood
  • Teenage Boys and Girls: Gender Rules
  • Multicultural Teens: Driving the Urban Youth Market
  • Action Sports Aficionados: Key Teen Market Segment

Market Trends

  • Generational Values Shape Teen Consumers
  • Technology Drives Teen Market
  • Crossover Trends Seen in Teen Market
  • Teen Health Problems Create Market Opportunities
  • Demographic Trends Will Change Teen Market Structure
  • Figure 3-1: Non-Hispanic Whites as Percent of Population of 12- to 19-Year- Olds, 1990, 2000, 2010

Industry Highlights

  • Teens Emerge as High-Growth Market Segment for Wireless Industry
  • Auto Industry Targets Teens Early
  • Teens Become Elusive Customers for Recorded Music Industry
  • Retailers Find Specialty Stores Work Best in Teen Market
  • Hospitality Industry Sees Teens as New Market
  • Teens Form Major Segment in Market for Health & Beauty Aids
  • Financial Services Industry Tries to Develop Products for Teens

Family Expenditures on Teens

  • Family Expenditures on Teens Analyzed
  • Families Spend Less on Older Teens
  • Figure 3-2: Family Expenditures on Children: by Age Group, 2000
  • Low-Income Teens More Self-Sufficient
  • Table 3-1: Estimated Annual Expenditures by Two-Child, Husband-Wife Families on 12- to 17-Year-Olds for Selected Consumer Products: by Age Group and Family Income Level, 2000
  • Families Spend $48.7 Billion on Food for Teens
  • Table 3-2: Aggregate Annual Family Expenditures on Food for 12- to 17-Year- Year-Olds: by Single Year of Age, 2000
  • Clothing Expenditures Top $21 Billion
  • Table 3-3: Aggregate Annual Family Expenditures on Clothing for 12- to 17- Year-Olds: by Single Year of Age, 2000
  • Families Spend Nearly $30 Billion on Personal-Care Items, Entertainment, and Reading Materials for Teens
  • Table 3-4: Aggregate Annual Family Expenditures on Personal-Care Items, Entertainment, and Reading Materials for 12- to 17-Year-Olds: by Single Year of Age, 2000
  • Family Expenditures on Teens Reach $100 Billion
  • Table 3-5: Aggregate Annual Family Expenditures on Food, Clothing, Personal- Care Items, Entertainment, and Reading Materials for 12- to 17- Year-Olds: by Age Group, 2000
  • Older Teens Account for More Food Expenditures and Younger Teens Absorb Greater Share of Other Family Expenditures
  • Table 3-6: Annual Family Expenditures on Food, Clothing, Personal-Care Items, Entertainment, and Reading Materials for 12- to 17-Year- Olds: by Percent of Total for Each Age Group, 2000
  • Table 3-7: Average Annual Family Expenditures on Food, Clothing, Personal- Care Items, Entertainment, and Reading Materials for 12- to 17- Year-Olds: by Age Group and Category of Expenditure, 2000

Teen Buying Power

  • Estimates of Size of Teen Market Vary Widely
  • Concept of “Buying Power” Used to Measure Size of Teen Market
  • Teen Buying Power Reaches $150 Billion
  • Table 3-8: Buying Power of 12- to 19-Year-Olds: by Age Group, 2001

Growth of the U.S. Teen Market

  • Family Expenditures on Younger Teens Will Reach $64.4 Billion in 2006
  • Table 3-9: Projected Growth in Family Expenditures on 12- to 14-Year-Olds for Selected Consumer Products, 2001-2006
  • Family Expenditures on Older Teens Will Grow 26.1%
  • Table 3-10: Projected Growth in Family Expenditures on 15- to 17-Year-Olds for Selected Consumer Products, 2001-2006
  • Family Expenditures on Teens Will Exceed $128 Billion in 2006
  • Table 3-11: Projected Growth in Family Expenditures on 12- to 17-Year-Olds for Selected Consumer Products, 2001-2006
  • Buying Power of 12- to 14-Year-Olds Will Reach $30.8 Billion in 2006
  • Table 3-12: Projected Growth in Expenditures by 12- to 14-Year-Olds, 2001-2006
  • Buying Power of 15- to 17-Year-Olds Will Show Highest Growth Rate
  • Table 3-13: Projected Growth in Expenditures by 15- to 17-Year-Olds, 2001-2006
  • Buying Power of Older Teens Will Reach $100 Billion in 2006
  • Table 3-14: Projected Growth in Expenditures by 18- and 19-Year-Olds, 2001-2006
  • Male Teens Have More Buying Power
  • Table 3-15: Projected Growth in Expenditures by 12- to 19-Year-Old Females, 2001-2006
  • Table 3-16: Projected Growth in Expenditures by 12- to 19-Year-Old Males, 2001-2006
  • Teen Buying Power Will Show Increase of 27.7%
  • Table 3-17: Projected Growth in Expenditures by 12- to 19-Year-Olds, 2001-2006

IV. Consumer Behavior

Teens’ Influence on Family Consumer Behavior

  • Teens Influence Household Brand Choices
  • Teens Increase Control over Buying Decisions
  • Most Teens Control Own Back-to-School Buying Decisions
  • Parents Cut Back on Spending for Own Clothing but Increase Expenditures on Clothing for Teen Children
  • Teens Provoke Major Grocery Expenditures
  • Table 4-1: Weekly Grocery Expenditures: by Presence of Children Ages 6 to11 and 12 to 17, Fall 2001
  • Table 4-2: Number of Times Did Fill-in Food Shopping in Last 4 Weeks: by Presence of Children Ages 6 to 11 and 12 to 17, Fall 2001
  • Teens Use Microwave to Cook for Families
  • Many Teens Shop for Food
  • Teens’ Households Look to Catalogs for Big-Ticket Items
  • Table 4-3: Catalog Shopping Patterns: by Presence of Children Ages 6 to 11 and 12 to 17, Fall 2001
  • Table 4-4: Catalog Expenditures: by Presence of Children Ages 6 to 11 and 12 to 17, Fall 2001
  • Teens Surrounded by Home Electronics
  • Table 4-5: Ownership of Computers and Home Electronics Equipment: by Presence of Children Ages 6 to 11 and 12 to 17, Fall 2001
  • Younger Kids More Involved than Teens with Parents’ Shopping
  • Table 4-6: Impact of Children on Buying Decisions: by Presence of Children Ages 6 to 11 and 12 to 17, Fall 2001

Shopping Behavior and Buying Patterns

  • Teens Visit Stores More than Other Shoppers
  • Teens Spend on Visits to the Mall
  • Convenience Stores Attract Teens
  • Teens Most Likely to Buy Beverages at Convenience Stores
  • Teens Buy Less Candy and Gum
  • Study Shows Increase in Teen Milk Consumption
  • Teens Shop with Cash
  • Films Have Limited Impact on Teen Consumer Behavior
  • TV Most Influential Advertising Medium for Teens
  • Research Reveals Value-Conscious Teens
  • Gender Differences Seen When Teens Eat Out
  • Clothing and Accessories Top Teen Spending Choices
  • Teenage Boys Now Fashion-Conscious Clothes Shoppers
  • Fashion Brands Top Teen Choices
  • Girls Become Major Music Customers
  • Proms Spur Major Teen Spending
  • Teen Consumers Influenced by Corporate Philanthropy

Teens and Technology

  • Online Teen Population Grows More than 50% in Four Years
  • Table 4-7: Internet Use from Any Location: by Age Group, 1998 vs. 2001
  • Table 4-8: Internet Use from Any Location by 12- to 19-Year-Olds: by Age Group, 1998 vs. 2001
  • Table 4-9: Growth in Internet Use from Any Location: 12- to 19-Year-Olds vs. All Individuals Ages 3 Years and Older, 1998-2001
  • Teens More Likely to Go Online at Home than at School
  • Table 4-10: Percent of 5- to 24-Year-Old Internet Users Who Use the Internet Only at Home: by Age Group, 1998 vs. 2001
  • Table 4-11: 5- to 24-Year-Old Internet Users: by Age Group and Location of Use, 2001
  • Socioeconomic Variables Affect Teen Internet Usage
  • Table 4-12: Internet Use among 10- to 17-Year-Olds: by Location of Use, Race and Hispanic Origin, and Family Income, 2001
  • Teens Seen as Most Computer Savvy Family Members
  • Teens View Internet Primarily as Social Tool
  • Survey Documents Social Uses of Internet
  • Teens Also Surf the Web for Fun
  • Gender Differences Seen in Teen Internet Use
  • Teens’ Use of Internet Broadens As They Get Older
  • Most Teens Use Internet to Research Purchases
  • Teens Shop Less Often but Spend As Much Online
  • Younger Teens Spend Proportionately More Online
  • Teens Quickest to Make First Online Purchase
  • Teen Consumers Embrace Wireless Technology

V. Media

Print

  • Survey Finds Teens Trust Newspapers More than TV
  • Teens’ Parents Depend on Magazines
  • Table 5-1: Attitudes toward Magazines: by Presence of Children Ages 6 to 11 and 12 to 17, Fall 2001
  • Magazine Advertising Viewed Positively
  • Table 5-2: Attitudes toward Advertising in Print Media: by Presence of Children Ages 6 to 11 and 12 to 17, Fall 2001
  • Big 4 Magazines Dominate Teen Publishing
  • Boys Absent from Teen Magazine Readership
  • Efforts to Launch General-Interest Magazines for Teen Boys Have Mixed Results
  • Male Teens Look to Action-Sports Magazines
  • Teen Magazine Field Increasingly Competitive
  • Teen Magazines Respond to Competitive Pressures
  • Seventeen Magazine Extends Brand

Television

  • Adults in Teen Households Less Involved in TV than Other Adults
  • Table 5-3: Attitudes toward Television: by Presence of Children Ages 6 to 11 and 12 to 17, Fall 2001
  • TV Advertising Not Seen as Negative
  • Table 5-4: Attitudes toward Television Advertising: by Presence of Children Ages 6 to 11 and 12 to 17, Fall 2001
  • Teens Watch Less TV than Adults
  • Cable Networks Top Teen Choices
  • Broadcast Networks Continue to Lose Teen Market Share
  • Broadcast Networks Search for Ways to Win Back Teen Viewers
  • Teens Prefer Sitcoms
  • MTV Stays on Top with Teens

Radio

  • Teens Turn On Radio
  • Teens Lead in Listening to Radio Online
  • Radio Favored in Teen Households
  • Table 5-5: Attitudes toward Radio: by Presence of Children Ages 6 to 11 and 12 to 17, Fall 2001

New Media

  • Internet Voted Top Medium
  • Research Shows Teens on Cutting Edge of Media Convergence
  • Redesign of MTV.com Reflects Teen Lifestyle
  • Alloy Uses Mixed Media to Reach Teens

VI. Overview Of Marketing, Promotional, And Advertising Strategies

Marketing Fundamentals

  • Deal with the Paradoxes of Teen Consumers
  • Understand that Teens Often Reject Mainstream Marketing Approaches
  • Appeal to Individuality While Leveraging Teens’ Influence with Their Peers
  • Acknowledge the Fickle Nature of Teen Consumers
  • Help Teens Create Their Own Trends
  • Affiliate with Teen Subcultures
  • Use Converging Technologies to Grab the Attention of Multitaskers
  • Try to Reach Teens Wherever They Can Be Found

Marketing and Promotional Approaches

  • Grassroots Marketing Seen as Crucial in Teen Market
  • Variety of Street Marketing Methods Used to Reach Urban Teens
  • Action Sports Tie-Ins Appeal to Key Segment of Male Teens
  • Online Promotion a Core Component of Integrated Teen Marketing Strategies
  • Viral Marketing Gains Support
  • Internet Used to Get Continuous Teen Feedback
  • P& G Creates Online Teen Community for Marketing and Product Development
  • Offline Viral Techniques Also Used in Teen Market Research
  • Entertainment Industry Uses Web-Based Viral Marketing to Build Teen Audiences
  • Event Marketing Attracts Teens’ Attention
  • Nintendo Integrates Online and Offline Word-of-Mouth to Promote Launch of GameCube
  • Celebrities Still Seen as Vital to Teen Marketing Strategies
  • Real-Life Product Placement Seen as Effective Teen Marketing Tool
  • Video Games Used for Product Placement
  • Logos Go Low-Key
  • Wireless Promotions Seen as Wave of the Future in Teen Market
  • Drug-Store Chains Look to In-Store Displays to Capture Teens
  • Companies Use Teen Marketing to Build Brand Loyalty Early

Advertising Strategies and Campaigns

  • Many Campaigns Reflect Desire of Teens to See Themselves in Ads
  • Levi’s Involves Real Teens in Advertising
  • Sprite Features Authentic “Voices” of Urban Teens
  • Clairol Stays with Celebrities in Teen Campaign
  • Heinz Ketchup Campaign Uses Humor to Connect with Teens
  • Starburst Spots Target Male Teens
  • Fruitopia Ads Geared to African American Teen Trendsetters
  • Frito-Lay Expands Online Ad Budget
  • Chocolate Milk Marketers Aim Ads at Teens
  • “Got Milk” Campaign Looks to Hispanic Teens
  • New Clearasil Ads Reflect Revamped Strategy
  • Stridex Ads Designed for Branding of New Product

VII. Case Studies Of Companies Marketing To Teens

Apparel and Footwear

  • Quiksilver’s Roxy Brand Symbolizes Active Teen Girls Lifestyle
  • AmeriCo Targets Teens with Pepsi and Mountain Dew Apparel
  • Turnstylz Caters to Plus-Size Teens

Food and Beverages

  • SoBe Moves beyond Grassroots Marketing with TV Campaign
  • New Pepsi Flavors Target Teens
  • Slim Jim Speaks to Male Teens

Health and Beauty Aids

  • P&G’s Cover Girl Focuses on Teen Girls
  • Mary Kay Introduces Product Line Aimed at Teens
  • Avon Launches Teen Business Unit

Retail

  • Abercrombie & Fitch Goes After Younger Crowd with Hollister
  • Target Turns its Attention to Teens
  • Department Stores Court Teens

Telecommunications

  • Verizon Targets Youth Market
  • Cingular Wireless Reaches Out to Teens
  • Virgin Mobile USA Launches Service Focused Exclusively on Youth Market

Appendix I: Examples Of Teen Advertising

Appendix II: Addresses Of Selected Teen Market Resources

  • Advertising/Marketing/Market Research
  • Publications
  • Other Media

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