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Pet Supplies and Pet Care Products: The U.S. Market and a Global Perspective


Attention: There is an updated edition available for this report.

Even as the economic picture improves, consumers remain cautious about spending, including in terms of the pet products they buy. Having lived up to its “recession-resistant” reputation once again, the business therefore continues to face challenges that have retailers, marketers and product developers relying more heavily than ever before on the all-important notion of pets as family. Accordingly, themes including health, function, comfort, safety, gifting, travel, and yes pet pampering are all weighing heavily on the value scale as market participants look to strike the perfect balance in pet categories across the board.

Tapping into Packaged Facts’ extensive pet market report collection and analyst expertise, Pet Supplies and Pet Care Products in the U.S., 8th Edition: Pet Health and Pampering: The New Value Equation provides detailed market breakouts and insights not available elsewhere. Covering non-food pet supplies of all types and for all companion animal types, the report examines trends in flea/tick care products, cat litter, toys, rawhide chews, bedding, grooming products, supplements, clean-up products and many other product segments. Using 2009 as the base year, it charts sales since 2005 and forecasts sales through 2014; breaks the market out by animal type and product category in both the mass-market and pet specialty channels; presents dollar sales and market share for leading marketers and brands; analyzes competitive strategies and shifts; profiles top companies and market innovators; analyzes new product trends; and provides demographic and psychographic profiles of product purchasers.

Trends examined include product positioning vis-à-vis the new economy; product humanization and pet pampering; natural, organic and “green” appeals; corporate responsibly and cause marketing; celebrity marketing and licensing (here comes Martha!); pet travel and convenience products; and gift/holiday fare. Special features include an expanded discussion of pet supplies purchasing by change in economic situation and by retail channel, focusing on cross-channel shopping and shopper loyalty; and proprietary pet owner survey data collected by Packaged Facts focusing on the economy and on the natural/organic products segment.

Meanwhile, pet market themes including humanization, health and convenience drive the world market for pet supplies, while taking on different meanings according to level of market development. And primarily because of these trends—coupled with the ongoing expansion of major multinational pet product marketers, pharmaceutical outfits, and big-box retailers—global sales of pet care products continue to rise despite the economic times. Pet Supplies and Pet Care Products: Global Market Overview 2010 charts global sales of non-food pet products for the 2005-2009 and 2009-2014 periods, comparing sales of non-food supplies with sales of pet food and pet products overall, and providing additional 2009 breakouts by world region, marketer and distribution channel. New product trends are quantified in terms of number of product launches (reports and SKUs), which are further broken out by world region, marketer, and package tag/marketing claim. Trends in the all-important BRIC nations of Brazil, Russia, India and China are charted separately, as is the market involvement of Spectrum Brands (United Pet Group and Tetra), Canada’s Rolf C. Hagen, Hartz Mountain (owned by Japan’s Sumitomo) and leading pet market catalog/online seller Drs. Foster & Smith.

Read an excerpt from this report below.

Report Methodology

The information in these reports was obtained from primary and secondary research. Primary research entailed attendance at the Global Pet Expo and Petfood Forum trade events from 2005 through 2009; consultations with pet product manufacturers and expert members of the trade; and an on-site examination of retail venues. Secondary research included extensive Internet canvassing and research- and data-gathering from relevant consumer business and trade publications; company reports including annual reports, press releases, and conference calls; company profiles in trade and consumer publications; government reports; and other pet market reports by Packaged Facts.

Sales estimates are based data from the above sources as well as Information Resources, Inc.’s (IRI) InfoScan Review, with data on new product introductions provided by Product Launch Analytics, a Datamonitor service. Analysis of consumer attitudes and demographics primarily derives from data compiled by Experian Simmons, New York, NY. On an ongoing basis, Experian Simmons conducts booklet-based surveys of a large and random sample of consumers who in aggregate represent a statistically accurate cross-section of the U.S. population. The Summer 2009 survey primarily cited in this report is based on 24,728 respondents, including 13,814 pet owners, 9,739 dog owners, and 6,033 cat owners.

The reports also include data from Packaged Facts’ February 2009 online poll of 1,668 pet owners; and data provided through special arrangements with the American Pet Products Association (APPA National Pet Owner Surveys); PET AGE (annual Retailer Reports); Pet Product News International (annual State of the Industry Reports); and the American Veterinary Medical Association.


Market Insights: A Selection From The Report


Mergers & Acquisitions

Despite the global economic meltdown and uncertainties surrounding major financial and lending institutions, the pet market saw several mergers and acquisitions in 2008 and 2009. On the non-food side, these included Bramton’s purchase of Veterinarian’s Best, Radio Systems’ purchase of MultiVet International, and Sergeant’s purchase of Chomp and of Virbac’s Consumer Brands division. Activity has been slower on the pet food side, with no major shifts occurring either year, although Old Mother Hubbard/Wellness (a top brand in the pet specialty channel) went from one venture capitalist to another. While still quite respectable, this level of activity pales in comparison to that seen earlier in the decade, with such dramatic shifts as Rayovac’s 2005 market entry and subsequent creation of Spectrum Brands, and Hartz’s summer 2004 acquisition by Japan’s Sumitomo.

Celebrities Weight In

Although celebrity involvement in the pet market is nothing new, the influx of famous names during the past couple years has been a boon, as discussed in Chapter 3 (see “Celebrity Involvement and Pet-Themed Hit TV Series”). Making the biggest splashes in non-food pet supplies are new lines from Cesar Millan, dog trainer to the rich and famous and star of the National Geographic Channel’s hit show Dog Whisperer With Cesar Millan, and American homemaking culture icon Martha Stewart, with both ventures involving licensees and retailer-exclusive distribution deals.

Two-Thirds Are Receptive to Affordable Natural/Organic Pet Supplies

According to Packaged Facts’ February 2009 online poll of 1,668 pet owners, nearly onefourth (24%) are either slightly inclined or very inclined to buy natural/organic pet foods or pet supplies, though those only slightly inclined to do so outnumber those who are very inclined at a 2:1 ratio. In addition, nearly half (46%) of pet owners would be slightly or very inclined to buy more natural/organic pet foods or pet supplies, if these products were more available where they shop, while nearly two-thirds (64%) would be slightly or very inclined to buy more natural/organic pet foods or pet supplies, if these were more affordable where they shop. These overall patterns do not differ significantly between pet owners overall and dog/cat owners.

In the News


U.S. Non-Food Pet Supplies Market Increases 3% in 2009,
Future Growth Hinges on Human-Animal Bond and Premium Consumer Spending

New York, January 19, 2010The U.S. market for non-food pet supplies (including grooming products and bedding) overcame economic setbacks that caused consumers to reduce spending in non-essential categories and trade over to lower-priced products, to grow 3% in 2009 to $11 billion, according to leading market research publisher Packaged Facts in the all-new report Pet Supplies and Pet Care Products in the U.S., 8th Edition

Packaged Facts identifies numerous signs that point to continued growth in sales of pet supplies, including the industry’s success in playing up the human-animal bond to drive higher-ticket sales; an ongoing surge of premium products responding to strong consumer demand and reminiscent of human fare; the growing role of premium demographics in the market; the growing population of pets with specialized health needs; and continued retail expansion in both traditional and non-traditional retail venues. 

“The word ‘restraint’ will continue to characterize how Americans shop and what they buy, making pet product appeals based on practicality, professionalism, health, safety, convenience and comfort more important than ever in wooing the nation’s 61 million pet-owning households and meeting the needs of their nearly 400 million pets,” says Don Montuori, publisher of Packaged Facts.

The human-animal bond has been a particularly important insulator against recessionary cutbacks.  The majority of American pet owners informally polled by Packaged Facts indicated that they have found themselves valuing the comfort and security their pets offer more than ever during the uncertain economic times of the past few years. As a result, pet owners are willing to invest in products directly beneficial to their pets’ health, including everything from natural and organic products to supplements and pet medications to heated pet beds and exercise toys.

Premium demographics are also significant contributors insulating the market because wealthier households are less likely to feel the financial pinch of a downturn as quickly or intensely.  In addition, wealthier consumers are more likely to read labels and pay attention to health claims, and to thus appreciate why higher priced products are worth the extra dollars in terms of potential pet health dividends.  Packaged Facts cites the growing clout of premium demographics as an indication of the success of pet supply marketers in tapping into pet owners’ willingness and desire to pamper their pets and provide them with the healthiest products available.

Pet Supplies and Pet Care Products in the U.S., 8th Editionprovides detailed market breakouts and insights covering non-food pet supplies of all types and for all companion animal groups (dogs, cats, small animals, birds, fish, reptiles, and amphibians). The report examines trends in flea/tick care products, cat litter, toys, rawhide chews, bedding, grooming products, supplements, clean-up products and more. Using 2009 as the base year, the report charts sales since 2005 and forecasts sales through 2014; breaks the market out by animal type and product category in both the mass-market and pet specialty channels; presents dollar sales and market share for leading marketers and brands; analyzes competitive strategies and shifts; profiles top companies and market innovators; analyzes new product trends; and provides demographic and psychographic profiles of product purchasers. 

About Packaged Facts - Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, publishes market intelligence on a wide range of consumer market topics, including consumer goods and retailing, foods and beverages, demographics, pet products and services, and financial products.  Packaged Facts also offers a full range of custom research services.

 

Pet Market Insights From Analyst David Lummis


Packaged Facts Column for Petfood Industry/1st Quarter 2010

State of the Industry
True to the pet industry’s recession-resistant claim to fame, sales of pet products and services rose 4.8% in 2009 to reach $53 billion, meaning that the market added two and a half billion dollars in the midst of the biggest economic crisis since the Great Depression.  That said, pet market growth has not been uniform across areas of the market, with the less discretionary categories of food and veterinary services faring the best, and non-essential products and services faring the worst.  Sales of veterinary services rose nearly 10% in 2009, followed by petfood at 5%, non-food supplies at 3%, and other pet services at 4%, according to Packaged Facts’ March 2010 Pet Market Outlook 2010-2011 report.

Moreover, while the recession is officially over, no one expects consumer confidence and spending to rebound overnight, with most economists predicting a slow recovery.  And no marketer or retailer can afford to ignore recessionary effects on consumer shopping patterns that could linger for years.  To weather the economic storm, many Americans reprioritized shopping lists along essential vs. discretionary lines, reevaluated channel loyalties based on factors including convenience and discounts, and traded across categories and brands.  For example, although dog and cat food sales rose 7% in 2009 according to Information Resources, Inc. data for supermarkets, drugstores and mass merchandisers except Walmart, this high rate of growth derives in part from slower going in the pet specialty channel.

In short, the word “restraint” will continue to characterize how Americans shop and what they buy in the years ahead, making petfood appeals based on health, safety, convenience, comfort, practicality and professionalism more important than ever in wooing the nation’s 61 million pet-owning households and meeting the needs of their nearly 400 million pets.  At the same time, there’s still plenty of room for pet pampering and indulgence positioned squarely on the human/animal bond, as reflected in dog biscuits/treats and cat snacks 2009 sales gains of 8% and 15%, respectively, per IRI.

Value, Value and Value
During 2010, the most effective strategy for all pet market players can be summed in a word:  Value.  Because this common denominator takes on different meanings for different consumer groups, Packaged Facts segments pet owners into three fairly evenly sized cohorts, each of which defines and responds to the notion of value in its own way.

  • Value-Critical Pet Owners tend to not view high prices as a primary petfood purchasing criterion, spending 25%-50% more than pet owners on average.  However, they do expect the products they buy to deliver tangible health benefits and emotional rewards, and will be the first to say so if they don’t.  Not surprisingly, this group comprises higher-income households as well as those who view their pets as full-fledged members of the family.  Because these dog and cat owners associate petfood and treats closely with pet health, they are the most ingredient-aware group and the least likely to switch brands absent a good reason.
  • Value-Influenced Pet Owners view pricing as a top petfood purchasing criterion.  Unlike value-driven consumers (see below), price is not, however, their foremost shopping draw, and they may be swayed in either premium or value directions.  This is the group Walmart is going after with its “exact same brands as those found in the pet specialty channel at unbeatable prices” campaign (which features the mass/specialty bridge brand Iams).  It’s also the target for PetSmart’s new TV commercials offering up to 20% savings on hundreds of items.  As this price-centered duel suggests, a fierce tug of war for value-influenced pet owners is underway, with a growing proportion of the group shopping both mass and pet specialty, and with the weak economy giving the latter a leg up.
  • Value-Driven Pet Owners base their petfood purchase primarily on price.  Although this does not preclude seeking out higher quality foods, this is the group most likely to hold the opinion that there’s little if any difference between national and store brands.  With the winds of the recession beneath its wings, private label increased its share of petfood sales to 11% ($622 million) in 2009, up from 10% ($543 million) in 2008, according to IRI, with value-driven pet owners likely representing the bulk of that 15% increase.

By focusing heavily on any one of these value groups, petfood marketers increase their chances of success during these still iffy economic times.  Even better, many companies and brands are well positioned to attract value-influenced pet owners in addition to one of the other groups, and during the coming year and beyond those “middle of the road” consumers will determine the fortunes of many pet market players.


Pets International, Issue 3/2010

U.S. Pet Supplies Market Expecting Pent-Up Demand
Retail Sales Near $11 Billion in 2009

Packaged Facts estimates that U.S. retail sales of non-food pet supplies totaled approximately $10.7 billion in 2009, up 2.5% over 2008.  During the five-year 2005-2009 period, the market increased by a total of 17.6% and posted a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 4.1%.  As a result of the economic recession, growth slowed in 2008 and 2009 as consumers reduced spending in non-essential categories and traded over to lower-priced products and value-oriented channels.

U.S. Retail Sales of Pet Supplies:  2005 vs. 2009
(in millions of dollars) Source:  Packaged Facts, The U.S. Market for Pet Supplies and Pet Care Products, 7th Edition report (January 2010)

PetSuppliesChart

Dogs account for the lion’s share of sales of pet supplies, at 61% in 2009, followed by cats at 33%.  The balance of sales goes to other animal types, with fish and reptiles slightly edging out birds and small animals, at 55% to 45%, respectively.  Flea/tick products are the top-selling dog category by a significant margin, accounting for almost one-quarter (23%) of dog supply sales during 2009 (inclusive of products restricted to the veterinary channel).  The cat side of the aisle is dominated by the staple litter, which accounted for 43% of cat supply sales during 2009.

Duo the Leading Retail Force
In the U.S. market, pet stores are the top channel for non-food pet supplies by a considerable margin, representing nearly half (46%) of sales in 2009.  Most of these pet specialty sales trace back to PetSmart and Petco, which together accounted for almost a third (31%) of the market in 2009, with independents pulling in less than half that amount (15%).  Supermarkets continue to slide, to 10% in 2009, while mass merchandisers continue to rise.  From 2005 to 2009, the mass sector’s market share went from 22% to 23%, no doubt benefiting from the recession as consumers traded down across brands and consolidated shopping trips. Another retailing bright spot is online, and with pet products showing up in a wider-than-ever array of channels, “other” channels’ collective share is also on the ups.

Mergers & Acquisitions Ongoing
Despite the global economic meltdown and uncertainties surrounding major financial and lending institutions, the pet market saw several mergers and acquisitions in 2008 and 2009.  On the non-food side, these included Bramton’s purchase of Veterinarian’s Best, Radio Systems’ purchase of MultiVet International, and Sergeant’s purchase of Chomp and of Virbac’s Consumer Brands division.  Activity has been slower on the pet food side, with no major shifts occurring either year, although Old Mother Hubbard/Wellness (a top brand in the pet specialty channel) went from one venture capitalist to another.  While still quite respectable, this level of activity pales in comparison to that seen earlier in the decade, with such dramatic shifts as Rayovac’s 2005 market entry and subsequent creation of Spectrum Brands, and Hartz’s summer 2004 acquisition by Japan’s Sumitomo.

2009 a Record Year for New Product Entries
The U.S. pet supplies market relies on new products as a principal sales driver, with upgrades and innovations constantly appearing to pique consumer interest and open retail doors, and marketers were apparently relying on new products more than ever during the economic downturn.  According to Product Launch Analytics, a Datamonitor service, the numbers of new product lines and stock-keeping units (SKUs) jumped sharply in 2009, with the number of reports increasing 57% to 213, and the number of SKUs increasing 84% to 735.  Considering the previous four-year period, this is the highest level of new product activity by far, with just 148 reports and 402 SKUs appearing in 2005.  Despite the weak U.S. economy, the top package tags and marketing claims make it clear that the pet market continues to shift in premium directions.  At the top of the list is natural, which appeared in 102 new product reports, up from 65 in 2008.

Economic Concerns Intensify Cross-Channel Competition
As of spring 2010, cross-channel competition is at an all-time high in the U.S. market as consumer trends adopted during the recession persist, from spending cutbacks to consolidated shopping trips.  Signs of the challenges retailers face include fierce competition between big-box pet specialty and mass, private-label incursions into non-food pet products, declining sales among independent pet specialty retailers, and price promotions across all retail sectors.  In such an environment, value-oriented retailers stand to cash in, as Walmart has been aggressively working to do.  According to Packaged Facts’ February 2010 pet owner poll, 52% of pet owners agree with the statement “I shop for pet products at a variety of stores to find the best prices, special offers, and sales,” with 16% strongly agreeing and 34% somewhat agreeing.  On the other hand, only 30% of survey respondents report that they do not engage in deal-seeking behavior of this sort.

With these same trends continuing into 2010, retailers are employing a variety of strategies to draw shoppers into the store, and cooperative promotional programs with vendors are going strong.  For retailers, one of the biggest advantages of co-op promotions is that the big consumer packaged goods outfits typically foot much of the bill, allowing retailers to impact trip decisions without compromising their own margins too drastically.  Coupon offers also can be highly effective in supporting store loyalty programs such as Petco’s PA.L.S. and PetSmart’s PetPerks, while forming the core of collaborative special events programs between retailers and manufacturers, à la PetSmart’s President’s Day sale featuring Hill’s Science Diet and its new lower pricing.

Looking Ahead
As a result, with the economy on a slow but apparently steady recovery path, Packaged Facts is predicting a better showing for pet supplies in 2010 as pent-up demand begins to kick in.  By our forecast, annual sales growth will rebound from 2.5% in 2009 to 4.0% during 2010, then climb back up to 5% in 2013 and 2014—an assessment that presumes much market dynamism moving forward.

Pet Supplies and Pet Care Products in the U.S., 8th Edition: Pet Health and Pampering: The New Value Equation

Chapter 1: Executive Summary
Introduction
Market Definition
Exclusions
Four IRI-Tracked Product Categories
Report Methodology
The Market
Retail Sales Slow in 2009
Figure 1-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Pet Supplies: 2005, 2009 and 2014 (in millions of dollars)
IRI-Tracked Sales at $1.9 Billion
Sales by Product Type
Natural and Organic Product Sales and Market Share
Retail Channel Shares and Trends
State of the Market
The Marketers
Number and Types
Second-Tier Multi-Category Marketers
Natural Product Specialists
Nestlé Purina Leads in IRI-Tracked Sales
Mergers & Acquisitions
Celebrities Weight In
Licensing Bigger Than Ever
The Private-Label Factor
Marketing and New Product Trends
Pet Market Advertising Tops $500 Million
Non-Traditional Media
Social Networking
Cause-Related Marketing
“Green” Initiatives
2009 a Record Year for New Product Entries
Dominant Themes Involve Premium Appeals
Retail Channel Trends
Economic Concerns Intensify Cross-Channel Competition
The PetSmart/Petco Dynamic Duo
Pet Superstores vs. Discount Stores
Independents and Supermarkets Continue to Slide
Non-Traditional Channels Gaining Ground
Independent Pet Stores Feel Economic Pinch
The Consumer
53% of Households Own Pets
Overview of Dog and Cat Supply Purchasing
Figure 1-2: Household Purchasing Rates for Dog or Cat Supplies by Category, 2009 (percent of U.S. households)
Two-Thirds Are Receptive to Affordable Natural/Organic Pet Supplies


Chapter 2: The Market
Introduction
Market Definition
Exclusions
Four IRI-Tracked Product Categories
Trade Associations and Shows
Regulatory Agencies and Trends
Report Methodology
Market Size and Growth
Retail Sales Slow in 2009
Table 2-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Pet Supplies, 2005-2009 (in millions of dollars)
IRI-Tracked Sales at $1.9 Billion
Table 2-2: IRI-Tracked Sales of Pet Supplies, 2005-2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 2-3: IRI-Tracked Sales of Pet Supplies by Category, 2009 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and units)
Table 2-4: IRI-Tracked Sales of Pet Supplies: By Category, 2005-2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 2-5: Growth of IRI-Tracked Sales of Pet Supplies: By Category, 2006-2009 (percent)
Table 2-6: Dollar Change in IRI-Tracked Sales of Pet Supplies by Category, 2005-2009 (in millions of dollars)
Market Composition
Sales by Product Type
Figure 2-1: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Pet Supplies by Animal Type: 2009 (percent)
Share of Dog Supply Sales by Product Category
Table 2-7: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Dog Supplies: By Category, 2009 (in millions of dollar and percent share)
Table 2-8: Average Annual Dog Supply Expenses: By Category, 2009 (in dollar)
Share of Cat Supply Sales by Product Category
Table 2-9: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Cat Supplies: By Category, 2009 (in millions of dollars and percent share)
Table 2-10: Average Annual Cat Supply Expenses: By Category, 2009 (in dollar)
Share of IRI-Tracked Sales by Product Category
Table 2-11: Share of IRI-Tracked Sales of Pet Supplies by Product Category: 2003, 2006 and 2009 (percent)
Share of Independent Pet Store Sales by Animal Type
Table 2-12: Share of Independent Pet Store Pet Supply Sales by Category: 2005-2008 (percent)
Share of Dog Category Sales by Product Type
Table 2-13: Share of Independent Pet Store Sales of Dog Products: By Category, 2005-2008 (percent)
Share of Fish Category Sales by Product Type
Table 2-14: Share of Independent Pet Store Sales of Fish Products: By Category: 2005 vs. 2008 (percent)
Share of Cat Category Sales by Product Type
Table 2-15: Share of Independent Pet Store Sales of Cat Products: By Category, 2005-2008 (percent)
Share of Small Mammal Sales by Product Type
Table 2-16: Share of Independent Pet Store Sales of Small Mammal Products: By Category, 2008 (percent)
Share of Bird Category Sales by Product Type
Share of Herptile Category Sales by Product Type
Table 2-17: Share of Independent Pet Store Sales of Bird Products: By Category, 2005 vs. 2008 (percent)
Table 2-18: Share of Independent Pet Store Sales of Herptile Products: By Category, 2008 (percent)
Natural and Organic Product Sales and Market Share
Figure 2-2: U.S. Retail Sales of Natural and Organic Pet Care Products: 2004, 2009 and 2014 (in millions of dollars)
Figure 2-3: U.S. Retail Sales and Share of Natural Pet Care Products: By Category, 2004 vs. 2009 (percent)
Retail Channel Shares and Trends
Table 2-19: Share of Pet Supply Sales: By Retailer Type, 2006 vs. 2009 (percent)
Dog/Cat Household Pet Supply Purchasing by Channel
Table 2-20: Pet Product Purchasing Patterns Among Dog or Cat Owners: By Retail Channel, 2007-2009 (percent of U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
Market Outlook
State of the Market
Recession Receding—Slowly
Pet Market Impact
Table 2-21: Percent of Pet Owners Who Anticipate Spending Less on Pet Food/Supplies or Pet Services in Next 12
Months, February 2009
Table 2-22a: Pet Owner Patterns: By Change in Financial Situation Compared With 12 Months Ago, 2009 (percent of U.S. pet-owning households)
Table 2-22b: Pet Owner Population: By Change in Financial Situation Compared With 12 Months Ago, 2009 (millions of number of U.S. pet-owning households)
Table 2-22c: Pet Owner Indexes: By Change in Financial Situation Compared With 12 Months Ago, 2009 (U.S. petowning households)
Human/Animal Bond a Potent Force
Figure 2-4: “Consider My Pet(s) Part of the Family”: By Percent of Pet, Dog/Cat, Dog and Cat Owners, February 2009 (percent)
Table 2-23: Mean Number of Veterinary Visits: By Human/Animal Bond Among Dog and Cat Households, 2006
Table 2-24: Mean Veterinary Expenditures: By Human/Animal Bond Among Dog and Cat Households, 2006 (in dollars)
All Things Pet Health
Product Safety a Growing Concern
Natural/Organic Products
Table 2-25: Percent of Pet Owners Who Purchased Natural/Organic Pet Products in Last 3 Months: Dog Owners vs. Cat Owners, February 2009 (percent of U.S. dog or cat owners)
Table 2-26: Percent of Pet Owners Who Would Buy More Natural/Organic Pet Products If They Were More Available or More Affordable, February 2009 (percent of U.S. dog or cat owners)
Functional Products
Figure 2-5: U.S. Retail Sales of Natural and Organic Pet Products: 2003, 2007 and 2012 (in millions of dollars)
Figure 2-6: U.S. Retail Sales of Pet Supplements and Nutraceutical Treats: 2003, 2007 and 2012 (in millions of dollars)
Figure 2-7: U.S. Retail Sales of Pet Medications: 2003, 2007
and 2012 (in billions of dollars)
Senior, Overweight and Special Needs Pet Products
Figure 2-8: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Senior, Weight Management and Special Needs Pet Products: By Category, 2008 (percent)
Premium Demographics Helping to Drive Expenditures
Table 2-27: Average U.S. Household Expenditures on Pet Supplies: 1998-2008 (in dollars)
Table 2-28: Share of U.S. Pet Supplies Expenditures: $70K+ vs. Under $70K Income Brackets, 1998-2008 (percent)
Table 2-29: $70K+ Household Share of U.S. Pet Market Expenditures: Total and By Category, 1998 vs. 2008 (percent)
Impact of Aging Pet Population
Figure 2-9: Percentage of Dogs and Cats Age 6 and Over: 1996 vs. 2006 (percent)
Impact of Pet Overweight, Obesity
Table 2-30: Percentage and Number of Overweight and Obese Dogs and Cats, 2008
Table 2-31: Percentage and Number of Overweight and Obese Dogs and Cats, 2007
Rise in Pet Travel Favors Many Product Categories
Favorable Trends in Pet Ownership
Figure 2-10: Household Penetration Rates for Selected Dogor Cat-Owning Classifications: 2003 vs. 2009 (percent of U.S. households)
Table 2-32: Household Penetration Rates for Selected Pet-Owning Classifications, 2007-2009 (percent of and number of U.S. households in millions)
More Pets than People
Table 2-33: Number of Pets in the United States by Type: 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006 and 2008 (number in millions and percent)
Impact of Boomers and Graying Population
Figure 2-11: Dog or Cat Ownership Rates by Age Bracket: 2003 vs. 2009 (percent of U.S. households)
Table 2-34: Household Penetration Rates for Selected Pet-Owning Classifications: By Generational Cohort, 2009 (percent of U.S. households)
Table 2-35: Household Populations for Selected Pet-Owning Classifications: By Generational Cohort, 2009 (number of U.S. households in millions)
Table 2-36: Indexes for Selected Pet-Owning Classifications: By Generational Cohort, 2009 (U.S. households)
Table 2-37: Number and Share of Total U.S. Population Growth for Selected Age Brackets: 2010, 2015 and 2020 (in thousands of number and percent)
Role of Gen Ys and Gen Xers
No-Kid Pet Household Clout
Table 2-38: Childless Dog or Cat Owners: Dog/Cat Ownership Rates and Share of Total Dog/Cat Owners: 2003, 2006 and 2009 (percent)
Celebrity Involvement and Pet-Themed Hit TV Series
Looking Ahead: Trends and Opportunities
Table 2-39: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Pet Supplies: 2009-2014 (in millions of dollars)


Chapter 3: The Marketers
Competitive Overview
Number and Types
Multi-Category Market Leaders
Second-Tier Multi-Category Marketers
Natural Product Specialists
Category Leaders
Cat Litter
Flea/Tick-Control Products
HBC (Grooming, Supplements, Oral Care)
Clean-Up/Odor-Control Products
Dog Chews
Toys
Training/Containment Products
Shelter, Crates, Carriers, Furniture
Non-Dog/Cat Supplies
Mergers & Acquisitions
Table 3-1: Timeline of U.S. Pet Supplies Marketer and Brand Acquisitions and Sales: 2004-2009
Human Product Mega-Marketers
Illustration 3-1: Orvis Dog Bed Selector Website Banner
Impact of Retailer Consolidation
Non-Food/Food Cross-Over
Mass/Pet Specialty Cross-Over
Channel and Retailer Exclusivity
Celebrities Weight In
Cesar Millan
Martha Stewart
Retailer Exclusivity
Licensing Bigger Than Ever
Illustration 3-2: Advertising for Vo-Toys’ Licensed Jeep Pet Products Collection
Disney’s Bolt
Pet Market Licensing Leaders
Jakks Pacific
Illustration 3-3: Advertising for Jakks Pacific’s Licensed AKC Pet Product Line
Illustration 3-4: Jakks Pacific’s Minnie Mouse Pet Apparel
Pet Brands
Purina Jumps In
The Kid Factor
Licensing Pros and Cons
The Private-Label Factor
Table 3-2: IRI-Tracked Sales of Private-Label Pet Supplies by Category: 2003, 2006 and 2009 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Table 3-3: U.S. Market for Pet Supplies: Selected Marketers and Leading Brands, 2009
Marketer and Brand Shares
Methodology
Nestlé Purina Leads in IRI-Tracked Sales
Figure 3-1: Top Marketers of Pet Supplies by Share of IRITracked Sales: 2006 vs. 2009 (percent)
Cat Litter Category: Consolidated But Still Branching Out
Figure 3-2: Top Marketers of Cat Litter by Share of IRITracked Sales: 2006 vs. 2009 (percent)
Competition Up in Natural Niche
Figure 3-3: Top Natural Cat Litter Brands by Share of IRITracked Sales: 2006 vs. 2009 (percent)
Other Dog/Cat Supplies: Category Leader Hartz Suffers Major Loss
Figure 3-4: Top Marketers of Other Dog/Cat Supplies by Share of IRI-Tracked Sales: 2006 vs. 2009 (percent)
Dog Chews: No. 1 Hartz Posts Big Losses
Figure 3-5: Top Marketers of Dog Chews by Share of IRITracked Sales: 2006 vs. 2009 (percent)
Non-Dog/Cat Supplies: Central Garden & Pet Coming on Strong
Figure 3-6: Top Marketers of Non-Dog/Cat Supplies by Share of IRI-Tracked Sales: 2006 vs. 2009 (percent)
Brand Rankings in the Pet Specialty Channel
Table 3-4: Marketer Sales and Shares of Pet Supplies in IRITracked Outlets by Category: 2008 vs. 2009 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Table 3-5: IRI-Tracked Sales of Cat Litter by Marketer and Brand: 2008 vs. 2009 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Table 3-6: Cat Litter Marketers by Dollar Change in IRITracked Sales: 2008 vs. 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 3-7: Cat Litter Brands by Dollar Change in IRI-Tracked Sales: 2008 vs. 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 3-8: IRI-Tracked Sales of Other Dog/Cat Supplies by Marketer and Brand: 2008 vs. 2009 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Table 3-9: Other Dog/Cat Supplies Marketers: By Dollar Change in IRI-Tracked Sales, 2008 vs. 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 3-10: Other Dog/Cat Brands by Dollar Change in IRITracked Sales: 2008 vs. 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 3-11: IRI-Tracked Sales of Dog Chews by Marketer and Brand: 2008 vs. 2009 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Table 3-12: Dog Chews Marketers by Dollar Change in IRITracked Sales: 2008 vs. 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 3-13: Dog Chews Brands by Dollar Change in IRITracked Sales: 2008 vs. 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 3-14: IRI-Tracked Sales of Non-Dog/Cat Supplies by Marketer and Brand: 2008 vs. 2009 (in thousands of dollars and percent)
Table 3-15: Non-Dog/Cat Supplies Marketers by Dollar Change in IRI-Tracked Sales: 2008 vs. 2009 (in thousands of dollars)
Table 3-16: Non-Dog/Cat Supplies Brands by Dollar Change in IRI-Tracked Sales: 2008 vs. 2009 (in thousands of dollars)
Table 3-17: Pet Specialty Market and Brand Leaders in Key Pet Supply Categories: 2004, 2006 and 2008
Competitor Profile: Central Garden & Pet
A Pet Supplies and Household Garden Market Leader
Company Acquires Farnam
A Pet Specialty and Mass-Market Leader
Table 3-18: IRI-Tracked Sales of Central Garden & Pet Pet Products by Category: 2008 vs. 2009 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Illustration 3-5: Central Garden & Pet’s New Comfort Zone Feline Wipes
Competitor Profile: Drs. Foster & Smith
The Top U.S. Pet Catalog Marketer
Building an Internet Presence
On the Air
Cause Marketing
Environmental Commitment
Aquatic Services
Competitor Profile: Hartz Mountain Corp
Corporate Overview
Mass-Market Sales Slipping
Table 3-19: IRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share of Hartz Mountain Pet Supplies, 2005-2009 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Product Innovation
Corporate Responsibility
Hartz Website Includes Online Tip Exchange
Looking Abroad
Competitor Profile: Doskocil (Petmate)
A Multi-Category Pet Supplies Powerhouse
Building on Innovation
Problem-Solution Focus
Aspen a Best-Selling Brand
Table 3-20: Doskocil’s IRI-Tracked Sales of Dog and Cat Supplies, 2008 vs. 2009 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Environmental Initiatives
Competitor Profile: Sergeant’s Pet Care, Inc
Overview
Table 3-21: IRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share of Sergeant’s Pet Care, 2005-2009 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Bulking Up Through Acquisitions
New Product Innovations
Increased Web Presence
Competitor Profile: Spectrum Brands
Company Overview
Table 3-22: Share of Spectrum Brands Net Sales, 2007-2009 (percent)
Abandoning Acquisitions Strategy
An Optimistic Outlook
Table 3-23: Spectrum Brands’ IRI-Tracked Pet Product Sales, 2008 vs. 2009 (in millions of dollars and percent)


Chapter 4: Marketing and New Product Trends
Marketing Trends
Pet Market Advertising Tops $500 Million
Table 4-1: Media Breakout of U.S. Advertising Expenditures on Pet Products, 2004-2008 (percent)
Human/Animal Bond More Important Than Ever
Illustration 4-1: Advertising for Bayer’s K9 Advantix
Value-Focused Advertising
Other Key Themes
Celebrity Kick
Trade Advertising and Promotions
Illustration 4-2: Advertising for Pet Care Systems’ Swheat Scoop
Non-Traditional Media
Internet Advertising
Social Networking
Cause-Related Marketing
Pet Marketers Embracing Sustainable Initiatives
Professional Endorsement and “Pro-Branding”
Brand “Toning”
Illustration 4-3: Advertising for Bramton’s Vet’s Best Line
New Product Trends
2009 a Record Year for New Product Entries
Table 4-2: Number of New Pet Supply Product Lines and SKUs, 2005-2009
Dominant Themes Involve Premium Appeals
Table 4-3: Top Pet Supply Product Selling Points by Package Tags/Marketing Claims, 2005-2009
Leading Marketers by Level of New Product Introductions
Table 4-4: Top Companies by Number of Pet Supplies New Product Launches: 2005-2009
Common Denominators in New Product Development
Value-Added/Functional
Natural/Organic
Product Humanization and Pet Pampering
Illustration 4-4: Advertising for ConairPets’ Grooming Clippers
Illustration 4-5: Advertising for Petmate’s Lifestyle Collection
Convenience
Illustration 4-6: Advertising for Liquid Net’s Ultimate Insect Repellant for Pets
Safety
Illustration 4-7: Advertising for Invisible Fence Training and Containment Products
Oral Care
Illustration 4-8: Advertising for Bamboo’s QuadBrush Ultimate Pet Toothbrush
Special Needs Products
Gifting and Luxury Products
Table 4-5: Pets and Gifts/Birthdays/Holidays: 2008 (percent, dollar, and number)
Illustration 4-9: Holiday Advertising for Humane Society Online Store
Luxury Products
Flea/Tick Products
Online Selling
Illustration 4-10: Advertising for DrsFosterSmith.com
Value
Safety
Natural
New Drugs and Anti-Diversion Initiatives
Cat Litter and Accessories
Illustration 4-11: Advertising for World’s Best Cat Litter
Illustration 4-12: Oil-Dri Corp’s Cat’s Pride Natural Scoop
Illustration 4-13: Automated Pet Care Products’ Litter-Robot
Toys
Interactive
Senior and Weight-Maintenance
Illustration 4-14: MultiVet’s SlimCat Food Distributor Ball
Super-Durable and Combo Chew/Food
Natural/Organic/Eco-Friendly
Small Dog Toys
Dog Chews
Variety
Oral Care
Functional
“Ethical” Claims
Grooming Products
Illustration 4-15: Advertising for Spa Lavish Your Pet’s Spa Colors Grooming Line
Illustration 4-16: Advertising for TropiClean’s TropiClean Pet Shampoo
Illustration 4-17: Advertising for HydroSurge RapidBath
Supplements
Illustration 4-18: Advertising for Nestlé Purina’s FortiFlora Supplement
Clean-Up/Odor-Control Products
Illustration 4-19: Advertising for Procter & Gamble’s Febreze Pet Odor Eliminators
Illustration 4-20: Advertising for Kegel’s Fizzion Concentrated Cleaner
Illustration 4-21: Advertising for Paramount’s AKC and CFA Clean-Up Products
Collars, Leashes and Leads
Illustration 4-22: Skeelo’s LumiLeash Retractable Leash
Illustration 4-23: Premier Pet’s Eco Gentle Leader Harness
Illustration 4-24: Website Banner for Coastal Pet’s Earth Soy Collars and Leads
Illustration 4-25: Dosha Dog’s Fashion Collars
Carriers, Crates, Shelter
Illustration 4-26: Creature Leisure’s The Carry Den XT
Illustration 4-27: New York Dog’s Little Red Barn Portable Dog Home
Bedding
Watering and Feeding Devices
Illustration 4-28: Omega Paw’s Portion Pacer Dog Bowl
Illustration 4-29: Veterinary Ventures’ Drinkwell 360 Pet Fountain
Electronic/High-Tech
Illustration 4-30: Advertising for Panasonic’s PetCam Network Camera
Pet ID Systems
Illustration 4-31: Advertising for IDtag.com
Illustration 4-32: White Bear Technologies’ RoamEO Pet Location System
Home DNA Test Kits
Illustration 4-33: Advertising for Mars Veterinary’s Wisdom Panel MX
Smart Pet Doors
Illustration 4-34: Advertising for New PetSafe Training Products
Non-Dog/Cat Supplies
Kid-Appeal
Illustration 4-35: SuperPet USA’s CritterTrail Treat Zone Habitat
Health/Functional
Illustration 4-36: Kaytee’s All-Natural Timothy Hay Plus
Illustration 4-37: Zoo Med Laboratories’ AvianSun Bird Lamp
Natural/Eco-Friendly
Illustration 4-38: T Weiss Organics’ Algae Magic Algae Inhibitor
Convenience/Effectiveness
Illustration 4-39: Lifegard Aquatics’ Lifegard WOW Aquarium Filter/Pump
Style
Illustration 4-40: Penn-Plax Life-Style Bird Cage
Illustration 4-41: Casco Group’s biOrb Life Aquarium
Category Cross-Over


Chapter 5: Retail Channel Trends
Economic Concerns Intensify Cross-Channel Competition
Pet Supply Shopping by State of Financial Situation
Table 5-1: Pet Product Purchasing Patterns Among Dog or Cat Owners by Retail Channel: By Change in Financial Situation Compared With 12 Months Ago, 2009 (percent of U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
Table 5-2: Pet Product Purchasing Indexes Among Dog or Cat Owners by Retail Channel: By Change in Financial Situation Compared With 12 Months Ago, 2009 (U.S. dog- or catowning households)
Pet Superstores vs. Discount Stores
Table 5-3: Pet Product Purchasing Patterns Among Dog or Cat Owners: By Retail Channel, 2007-2009 (percent and millions of number of U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
Independents and Supermarkets Continue to Slide
Non-Traditional Channels Gaining Ground
Table 5-4: Shopping Rates for Selected Retail Chains and Internet/Catalog Merchants Among Dog or Cat Owners Who Purchase Pet Supplies at “Other” Outlets, 2009 (percent and index of U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
Channel Loyalty Waning
Table 5-5: Overview of Retail Channel Loyalty in Pet Product Purchasing Among Dog or Cat Owners, 2004 vs. 2009 (percent and in millions of number of U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
Table 5-6: Retail Channel Loyalty in Pet Product Purchasing Among Dog or Cat Owners, 2007-2009 (percent and in millions of number of U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
Figure 5-1: Percent of Pet Product Customers Who Shop Across Channels: By Major Retail Sector, 2004 vs. 2009 (U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
The PetSmart/Petco Dynamic Duo
Table 5-7: PetSmart and Petco Combined Sales: 2001-2008 (in millions of dollars)
Other Top-Ranked Pet Specialty Chains
Company Profile: PetSmart, Inc.
Table 5-8: PetSmart Sales: 1999-2008 (in millions of dollars)
Expansion, Growth Despite Down Economy
Table 5-9: Number of PetSmart Stores in Operation, 1999-2009
Impact of Economic Downturn
Martha Stewart Line to Debut as PetSmart Exclusive
Rewarding Customer Loyalty Key to Success
Company Profile: Petco Animal Supplies, Inc.
Table 5-10: Petco Annual Sales: 2000-2008 (in millions of dollars)
Changes and Challenges
Table 5-11: Number of Petco Stores in Operation, 1999-2009
Celebrity Tie-Ins
Petco Tests “Unleashed” Concept
A New Staff Training Program
Marketing and PR
Independent Pet Stores Feel Economic Pinch
Table 5-12: Top Challenges Pet Specialty Retailers Face in Next Two Years: 2008-2009 vs. 2009-2010 (percent)
Table 5-13: Pet Specialty Retailer Average Gross Dollar Volume: 2001-2008 (in dollars)
Increasing Competition from Mass, Pet Superstores
Food Sales Boost Independents’ Profile
Distributors Also Helping Out
Survival of the Industry
Walmart Bullish on Pet Supplies
Target Also Coming on Strong
Supermarkets Still Struggling to Compete
Natural Supermarket Trends
Table 5-14: Share of Pet Product Sales in Natural Supermarkets: By Category, 2005-2008 (percent)
Table 5-15: Percent of Dog or Cat Owners Shopping at Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods, 2005-2009 (percent and number of U.S. dog- or cat-owning adults)
Table 5-16: Pet Owner Shopping Patterns: Trader Joe’s vs. Whole Foods, 2007-2009 (percent, number, and index for U.S. pet-owning adults)
Illustration 5-1: Pet Department in Whole Foods
Illustration 5-2: Pegboard Display of Pet Treats and Rawhides in Whole Foods
Wholesale Clubs
Dollar Stores
Convenience Stores
The Internet Effect
Leading E-tailers of Pet Food and Supplies
Pet Retailers Turn to Blogs, Social Networking


Chapter 6: The Consumer
Pet Ownership Trends
The Simmons Survey System
53% of Households Own Pets
Table 6-1: Household Penetration Rates for Selected Pet-Owning Classifications: Overall and by Generational Cohort, 2009 (percent, number and indexes of U.S. households)
Boomers Still Account for Plurality of Pet Owners
Overall Pet Ownership Rates Are Edging Up
Table 6-2: Household Ownership of Selected Pet-Owning Classifications, 2006-2009 (percent and number of U.S. households)
Overview of Dog and Cat Supply Purchasing
Gains for Flea/Tick, Heartworm Products
Figure 6-1: Household Purchasing Rates for Dog or Cat Supplies by Category, 2009 (percent of U.S. households)
Table 6-3: Households Purchasing Rates for Dog or Cat Supplies by Category, 2004-2009 (percent of U.S. households)
Top-Line Purchasing Rates by Product Type
Table 6-4: Household Purchasing of Dog or Cat Supplies by Category and Type, 2009 (percent and number of U.S. dogor cat-owning households)
Figure 6-2: Purchasing of Cat Box Filler/Litter Type, 2009 (percent and number of U.S. cat-owning households)
Two-Thirds Are Receptive to Affordable Natural/Organic Pet Supplies
Table 6-5: Pet Owner Disposition to Buy Natural/Organic Pet Foods or Pet Supplies, February 2009 (percent)
Patterns by Pet Channel and Product Type
Table 6-6: Pet Supply Purchasing Rates by Retail Channel: By Pet Supply Type, 2009 (percent of U.S. pet-owning households)
Table 6-7: Total Number of Pet Supply Purchasing Households by Retail Channel: By Pet Supply Type, 2009 (U.S. pet-owning households in thousands)
Table 6-8: Pet Supply Purchasing Indices by Retail Channel: By Pet Supply Type, 2009 (U.S. pet-owning households)
Consumer Focus: Flea- and Tick-Care Products
35% Use Frontline
Southeast Is Prime Region
Table 6-9: Purchasing Overview for Flea/Tick Care Products for Dogs and Cats: Overall and by Purpose, Type and Brand, 2009 (percent and number of U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
Table 6-10: Purchasing Rates for Flea/Tick Care Products for Dogs and Cats: Overall and by Purpose, Type and Brand, 2007-2009 (percent of U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
Table 6-11: Purchasing Indices for Flea/Tick Care Products: By Gender, 2009 (U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
Table 6-12: Purchasing Indices for Flea/Tick Care Products: By Adult Age Bracket, 2009 (U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
Table 6-13: Purchasing Indices for Flea/Tick Care Products: By Race/Ethnicity, 2009 (U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
Table 6-14: Purchasing Indices for Flea/Tick Care Products: By Region, 2009 (U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
Table 6-15: Purchasing Indices for Flea/Tick Care Products: By Household Income Bracket, 2009 (U.S. dog- or catowning households)
Consumer Focus: Heartworm Control Products
68% of Dog Owners Buy Heartworm Control
Figure 6-3: Percent and Number Who Purchase Heartworm Control Products for Dogs or Cats, 2009 (percent and number of U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
Table 6-16: Purchasing Rates for Heartworm Products for Dogs or Cats, 2007-2009 (percent of U.S. dog- or catowning households)
Table 6-17: Purchasing Rates for Heartworm Products for Dogs or Cats: By Change in Economic Situation Compared With 12 Months Ago, 2009 (percent of U.S. dog- or catowning households)
Distinct Draws by Type of Pet
Table 6-18: Purchasing Indices for Heartworm Control Products: By Selected Demographic Traits, 2009 (U.S. dogor cat-owning households)
Consumer Focus: Cat Litter
84% Use Cat Filler/Litter
Table 6-19: Purchasing Overview for Cat Filler/Litter Products: Overall and by Type, Brand, and Frequency of Use, 2009 (percent and number of U.S. cat-owning households)
Table 6-20: Purchasing Rates for Cat Filler/Litter Products: Overall and by Type, Brand, and Frequency of Use, 2007-
2009 (percent of U.S. cat-owning households)
Table 6-21a: Purchasing Patterns for Cat Filler/Litter Products by Type, 2005-2009 (percent of U.S. cat-owning households)
Table 6-21b: Purchasing Patterns for Cat Filler/Litter Products by Type, 2005-2009 (number of U.S. cat-owning households)
Indicators for Above-Average Use
Table 6-22: Purchasing Indices for Cat Box Filler/Litter: By Gender, 2009 (U.S. cat-owning households)
Table 6-23: Purchasing Indices for Cat Box Filler/Litter: By Adult Age Bracket, 2009 (U.S. cat-owning households)
Table 6-24: Purchasing Indices for Cat Box Filler/Litter: By Race/Ethnicity, 2009 (U.S. cat-owning households)
Table 6-25: Purchasing Indices for Cat Box Filler/Litter: By Region, 2009 (U.S. cat-owning households)
Table 6-26: Purchasing Indices for Cat Box Filler/Litter: By Household Income Bracket, 2009 (U.S. cat-owning households)
Consumer Focus: Pet Supplements
15 Million Purchase Nutritional Supplements for Dogs or Cats
Figure 6-4: Consumer Base for Nutritional Supplements for Dogs or Cats, 2007-2009 (percent and number of U.S. dogor cat-owning households)
Higher Indexes for Hispanics, Blacks
Table 6-27: Purchasing Indices for Pet Supplements: By Selected Demographic Traits, 2009 (U.S. dog- or cat-owning households)
Pet Supplies and Pet Care Products: Global Market Overview 2010

Introduction
Scope of Report
Report Methodology
Global Market Overview
Value of Global Pet Care Product Sales
Figure 1: Global Retail Sales of Pet Supplies: 2005, 2009 and 2014 (in billions of U.S. dollars)
Figure 2: Global Retail Sales of Pet Supplies: Compound Annual Growth Rates, 2005-2009 vs. 2009-2014 (percent)
U.S. Retail Sales Slow in 2009
Figure 3: U.S. Retail Sales of Pet Supplies: 2005, 2009 and 2014 (in millions of dollars)
Market Share by Global Region and Channel
Figure 4: Share of Global Pet Supplies Sales by Region: 2009 (percent)
Retail Expansion Key to Growth in Developing Markets
Global Sales by Distribution Chanel
Figure 5: Share of Global Sales by Region: Non-Food Pet Supplies vs. Pet Food, 2009 (percent)
Pet Product Marketer Ranking
Figure 6: Global Pet Product Market Leaders: 2009 (percent)
Spectrum Brands an International Pet Supply Powerhouse
Figure 7: Pet Supply Share of Spectrum Brands Net Sales, 2007-2009 (percent)
Sumitomo Expanding Hartz Brand in Asia-Pacific
Rolf C. Hagen a Privately Owned Global Player
Mars Consolidates Global Brand Focus
Rates of Global Product Launches
Table 1: Number of Global Pet Supplies Product Launches: Reports and SKUs, 2005-2009
North America Out Front
Figure 8: Pet Supplies Product Launches by Number of SKUs: BRIC Countries, 2005-2009
Table 2: Share of Global Pet Supplies Product Launches by Region: 2005, 2007 and 2009 (percent)
Top Global Marketers by Level of New Product Activity
Table 3: Top 10 Companies by Number of Global Pet Supplies New Product Launches: 2005- 2009
Key Marketing Claims Involve Premium Appeals
Table 4: Top 20 Package Tags/Marketing Claims: By Number of Global Pet Supplies New Product Launches, 2007 vs. 2009
Illustration 1: Advertising for Rolf C. Hagen GLO Aquarium Lighting
Illustration 2: Advertising for Beaphar Calming Dog and Cat Collars
Illustration 3: Advertising for PetSafe Electronic Training Products
Drs. Foster & Smith Ranks High in Catalogs/Online
Illustration 4: Advertising for DrsFosterSmith.com
Global Market Trends
Humanization at Core of Value Growth
Health Trends Increasingly Relating to Pet Age, Obesity
Convenience Appeals Vary by Level of Market Development
Impact of Aging Human Population
The Urban Effect
Tapping High-Income Demographics
Trickle-Down Premiumization
Strong Global and U.S. Sales of Pet Medications Bode Well for Pet Supplies of All Kinds
Figure 9: Share of Global Animal Health Sales: Production Animal vs. Companion Animal, 2003, 2007 and 2012 (percent)
North American Pet Insurance Going Strong
Focus on Indoor and Smaller Pets
Food/Non-Food Brand Cross-Over
Walmart and Other Big Boxes Eying India and Russia
The Internet Effect
Table 5: Global Internet Penetration Rates and Share of World Users, 2009 (percent)
BRIC Country Pet Market Snapshots
Brazil
Russia
India
China

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