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Low Glycemic Index Foods and Beverages in the U.S.

Products with low-glycemic labeling have been on store shelves around the world for about 20 years, but in the United States, it was first around 2003 that such products entered mainstream U.S. supermarkets. And even then, their presence has been minimal in the marketplace. However, most food industry experts predict this is going to change, and that promoting foods based on their glycemic index, or a similar measure, is going to have a long-lasting impact on the way Americans choose the foods and beverages they consume.

Prior to 2003, U.S. products that boasted the fact that they were low-glycemic tended to be dietary or nutritional supplements, rather than foods and beverages, and were sold in natural food stores. After the low-carb diet came and disappeared, U.S. consumers began to understand that not all carbohydrates are created equal. They started to understand the difference, and many were immediately open to the concept of low-glycemic foods and beverages.

Low Glycemic Index Foods and Beverages in the U.S., a new report from Packaged Facts, includes an in-depth analysis of leading, as well as up-and-coming marketers of low glycemic index foods, including an overview of their offerings and their position in the marketplace. Insight is provided to what retailers are currently offering and what they want to offer. If you are a product developer, a marketer, or a retailer, this report is a must-have-tool in order to effectively compete in the growing, and very profitable low glycemic index foods market.

Report Methodology
The information contained in this report was obtained from both primary and secondary research. Primary research entailed in-depth, on-site examinations of supermarkets, drug stores, mass merchandisers, convenience stores (c-stores), and club stores. Company, distributor, and retailer interviews were conducted to obtain information on new product and packaging trends, marketing programs, distribution methods, and technological breakthroughs. Secondary research entailed data gathering from relevant sources. Included were consumer and industry publications, newspapers, government reports, financial reports, company literature, and corporate annual reports.

Overall market data is for the entire retail industry. No foodservice sales are included.

Specific branded retail market figures focus on sales through mainstream supermarkets, mass merchandisers, and drug stores and are based on data from Information Resources Inc. (IRI), Chicago, Illinois.

The analysis of consumer demographics is derived from the Fall 2003, 2004, and 2005 Simmons Adult National Consumer Surveys.

What You’ll Get in this Report
Low Glycemic Index Foods and Beverages in the U.S. makes important predictions and recommendations regarding the future of this market, and pinpoints ways current and prospective marketers can capitalize on current trends and spearhead new ones. No other market research report provides both the comprehensive analysis and extensive data that Low Glycemic Index Foods and Beverages in the U.S. offers. The report addresses the following segments:

  • The Market (including market size and composition, and projected market growth)
  • The Marketers (including discussions of specific marketer brand and market shares)
  • Competitive Profiles (of the mainstream marketers, specialists and up-and-coming niche players, and analyses of the products they market)
  • The Consumer (who’s buying what, and where)
  • The Products
  • Trends and Opportunities

Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is already competing in the food industry, or is considering making the leap, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current market for low glycemic index foods, as well as projected sales and trends through 2011. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of sales data, and a detailed discussion of the consumer for low glycemic index products.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for low glycemic index foods and beverages.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for low glycemic index foods and beverages.
  • Advertising agencies working with clients in the food industry understand the product buyer to develop messages and images that compel consumers to purchase these products.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.


  • Executive Summary
    • Scope and Methodology
      • Report Methodology
    • The Products
      • Products Analyzed
      • What Is Glycemic Index?
      • What’s Glycemic Load?
      • Carbohydrates Are Not Equal, Hence the Reason for Glycemic Index
      • Low-Glycemic Ingredient Options
      • The Fiber and Grain Connection
    • Size and Growth of the Market
      • Low-Glycemic Products Are Really Just Now Gaining Momentum
      • 2006 Sales Come in at $350 Million
      • Sales Will Exceed $1.8 Billion by 2011
        • Table U.S. Sales of Low-Glycemic Products, 2002-2011 (in millions of dollars)
      • Bars Dominate, Beverages Follow
        • Table Low-Glycemic Foods and Beverages: Share of Dollar Sales by Outlet, 2006
    • New Products and Trends Driving Market Growth
      • Americans Are Becoming More focused on Health and Wellness
      • Increased Efforts in Marketing and Understanding Glycemic Index
    • The Marketers in the Marketplace
      • All Types of Marketers
      • Where Consumers Shop for These Foods
      • Traditional Supermarkets Account for 65.0% of Retail Sales
        • Table Low-Glycemic Foods and Beverages: Share of Dollar Sales by Outlet, 2006
      • Low-Glycemic Foods and Beverages in the Retail Environment
      • Drugstores Provide Double Exposure
      • Supermarkets and Mass Merchandisers
      • Warehouse Clubs
    • The Consumer
      • Target Former Carb Counters, Diabetics, and Energy-Seeking Youth
  • The Products
    • Key Points
      • Not All Carbohydrates Are Created Equal
      • Products Included and Excluded From This Report
      • Food Technologists Says Glycemic Index Is Where the Action Is
      • What Is Glycemic Index?
      • The Glycemic Index Database
      • What’s Glycemic Load?
      • AACC Approves Definitions Related to Glycemic Carbohydrates
      • Next Steps on Definitions
      • Labeling Terminology
      • Be Honest and Non-Deceptive
      • Who Is the Glycemic Research Institute?
    • Clinical Significance of Glycemic Index
      • The Benefits of a Low-Glycemic Diet
      • The Link Between Diabetes and Glycemic Index
      • A Few Facts on Diabetes
      • New Findings Build Case for Low-Glycemic Diets
    • Carbohydrates-The Basis of the Glycemic Index
      • Carbohydrates on the Nutrition Facts Panel
        • Table Nutrition Facts Label
      • Understanding Carbohydrates
      • The Basics on Carbohydrates
      • Some Complex Carbohydrates Can Be Considered Low-Glycemic
      • Processing Impacts Glycemic Index, Too
  • Formulating Low-Glycemic Products
    • Key Points
      • Low-Glycemic Ingredient Options
      • FDA Publishes Positioning Paper on Artificial Sweeteners
      • Alternative Sweeteners
      • Whole Grains and Fiber
        • Table Select Carbohydrates: Relative Sweetness, Caloric Availability, and Glycemic Response
      • Miscellaneous Ingredients
      • Progressive Scientific Discoveries
  • The Market
    • Key Points
      • Market Definition
      • Low-Glycemic Products First Make Impact Around 2003
      • Market Size and Growth
      • 2006 Finishes Off with $350 Million in Sales
        • Table U.S. Retail Sales of Low-Glycemic Products, 2002-2006 (in millions of dollars)
      • Peaks Coincide with the Low-Carb Movement
    • Market Composition
      • Bars Dominate, Beverages Follow
        • Table Low-Glycemic Foods and Beverages: Share of Dollar Sales by Outlet, 2006
      • Where Consumers Are Making Their Retail Purchases
        • Table Low-Glycemic Foods and Beverages: Share of Dollar Sales by Outlet, 2006
    • Factors to Market Growth
      • It’s All About Obesity, Diabetes, and Overall Health and Wellness
    • Projected Market Growth
      • Sales Are Projected to Reach Almost $1.8 Billion by 2011
        • Table Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Low-Glycemic Products, 2006-2011 (in millions of dollars)
  • The Marketers
    • Key Points
      • All Types of Marketers
      • The Five Leading Marketers
        • Table U.S. Low-Glycemic Foods and Beverages: Five Leading Marketers and Brands, 2006
      • It’s the Smaller Players That Are Innovators
      • To Focus on Diabetics or Not
      • Marketers Set the Stage with Low-Carb Products
      • The Atkins Evolution
      • The Atkins Advantage
      • Marketers Vary in Glycemic Index Labeling
      • A Peak at What the Europeans Are Doing
    • Competitive Situation
      • IRI Data Is Not Available for Most Marketers
      • Bars See Dip with Low-Carb Demise, But Pick Up
        • Table U.S. Low-Glycemic Foods and Beverages: Select Brands of Bars, Dollar Sales, 2001-2006 (in thousand of dollars)
      • Same Story for Beverages
        • Table U.S. Low-Glycemic Foods and Beverages: Select Brands of Beverages, Dollar Sales, 2001-2006 (in thousand of dollars)
      • An Opportunity for Low-Glycemic Pasta
        • Table U.S. Low-Glycemic Foods and Beverages: Select Brand of Pasta, Dollar Sales, 2001-2006 (in thousand of dollars)
      • A Glance at the Sugar-Free Candy Category
        • Table U.S. Low-Glycemic Foods and Beverages: General Sugar-Free Candy Categories, Dollar Sales, 2001-2006 (in millions of dollars)
    • Competitive Profile: Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois
      • Company Overview
      • The Glucerna Family of Products
    • Competitive Profile: Atkins Nutritionals, Inc., Melville, New York
      • Company Overview
      • Commitment to Building the Brand
      • Launch of Patent-Pending Glycemic Index Test
      • How Does the Net Atkins Count Method Work?
    • Competitive Profile: Eat Well Be Well Foods, Inc., Hood River, Oregon
      • Company Overview
      • Details on The Product Line
    • Competitive Profile: Fifty 50 Foods
      • Company Overview
      • Extensive Product Line
    • Competitive Profile: The Hain Celestial Group, Inc., Melville, New York
      • Company Overview
      • The Disappearing Diet Aisle
      • Keeping the Brand Alive
      • Using a Variety of Alternative Sweeteners
    • Competitive Profile: The Hershey Co., Hershey, Pennsylvania
      • Company Profile:
      • Sugar-Free Candies Tout Low-Glycemic Index on Front Labels
    • Competitive Profile: Kellogg Co., Battle Creek, Michigan
      • Company Overview
      • Kellogg, Always the Innovator
      • The Kashi Story
      • Extending Other Brands Beyond Cereal
      • Innovative R&D Department Does Its Homework
    • Competitive Profile: Russell Stover Candies Inc., Kansas City, Missouri
      • Company Overview
      • Leadership in Sugar-Free and Low-Glycemic Candies
    • Competitive Profile: Solo GI Nutrition, Edmonton, Alberta-Canada
      • Company Overview
      • First Clinically Validated Bar to Market
      • But They’re Still High in Carbs
      • Snack Size Bar Follows 100-Calorie Pack Trend
  • The Retail Market
    • Key Points
      • Shopping Options Are Plentiful
      • So Where Are Consumers Shopping?
      • Different Types of Retail Outlets
      • Traditional Supermarkets Account for 65.0% of Retail Sales
        • Table Low-Glycemic Foods and Beverages: Share of Dollar Sales by Outlet, 2006
      • Different Formats Attract Consumers for Their Varied Needs
      • Channel Blurring Continues to Grow
      • Traditional Supermarkets Down in Number
      • Just How Much Can a Store Carry?
      • Who Are the Leading Retailers?
        • Table Top-Five U.S. Discount-Style Food Store Chains, by Dollar Sales and Store Count, 2005
        • Table Top-Three U.S. Niche-Style Food Store Chains, by Dollar Sales and Store Count, 2005
      • Low-Glycemic Foods and Beverages in the Retail Environment
      • Drugstores Provide Double Exposure
      • Supermarkets and Mass Merchandisers
      • Warehouse Clubs
      • Special Dietary Needs Products Are Not Big at Club Stores
        • Table Comparative Price of Select Low-Glycemic Foods and Beverages: Supermarket vs. Club Store, 2006
      • Special-Needs Shoppers Are Confused
      • Never Under Price
        • Table Retail Price of Select Low-Glycemic Foods and Beverages, 2006
      • Never Seeing the Inside of a Store
      • How to Get Your Products in Retail Distribution
      • Direct Delivery Advantages
      • The Cost of Face-To-Face Business
      • Advantages of Warehouse Delivery
      • Smaller Marketers Work Through Brokers
      • Introducing New Special Dietary Needs Products to the Marketplace
  • The Consumer
    • Key Points
      • Consumer Awareness of Glycemic Index
      • The Impact on Consumers
      • The Glycemic Index - Diabetes Connection
        • Table Consideration of Glycemic Index or Glycemic Load, All Respondents, 2005 How often, if at all, do you consider the glycemic index (or glycemic load) of a food or beverage when deciding to eat it? (n=324)
        • Table Consideration of Glycemic Index or Glycemic Load, Respondents with a Family History of Diabetes, 2005 How often, if at all, do you consider the glycemic index (or glycemic load) of a food or beverage when deciding to eat it? (n=127)
        • Table Consideration of Glycemic Index or Glycemic Load, Respondents with no Family History of Diabetes, 2005 How often, if at all, do you consider the glycemic index (or glycemic load) of a food or beverage when deciding to eat it? (n=197)
      • Diabetics Are a Target Audience for Low-Glycemic Foods
      • A Diabetic’s Wish List
      • Eating Patterns in America Include Reducing Sugar
    • Simmons Consumer Survey
      • What the Numbers Say
        • Table Percent of U.S. Households Using Select Foods and Beverages, 2003-2005
  • New Products and Trends
    • Key Points
      • Low-Glycemic Products First Make Impact Around 2003
      • Driving Forces for an Increase in Glycemic and Glucose Labeling
        • Table Total Number of SKUs Introduced to the U.S. Marketplace with a Low-Glycemic Tag/Claim, or Related Statement, 2001-2005
    • New Products in 2005 and 2006
      • Most Introductions Focus on Grains and Sweeteners
      • Going Low-Glycemic the Solo Way
      • Being Smart When in You’re in the Zone
      • Estee Expands Diabetic Product Lines to Include Low Glycemic
      • Atkins Educates Consumers About Its Products’ Advantages
      • Being in the Breakfast Zone
      • Eat Well, Be Well With New Cereals, Bars, and Candies
      • Low-Glycemic Bread for Diabetics
      • Drinks with Zest Target Diabetics
      • How ZSweet It Is to Be an All-Natural, Non-Caloric Sugar Alternative
      • New Beverage Answers Need for Lower-Sugar Kid’s Products
      • Managing Glucose Via a Nutritional Beverage
      • A Frozen Dessert Like No Other in the Marketplace
      • Reformulating Products to Make Low-Glycemic Claims
      • New Candies Worthy of Mentioning
        • Table New Products with Low-Glycemic Claims/Tags, 2006
  • Selected Addresses

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