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Kids Food and Beverage in the U.S.


Attention: There is an updated edition available for this report.

Childhood obesity and nutrition is all over the news and is serving as the fuel for marketers developing products that appeal to consumers ages 3 to 11, and, of course, their gatekeepers. Since the turn-of-the-century, the dynamics of the kids’ food and beverage business have changed dramatically. For starters, there have been aggressive efforts in making products that really only appeal to kids. For example, 10-plus years ago, ordinary macaroni and cheese (elbow noodles) would be considered a kids’ food. In this report, it is not. To be considered a kids’ food, the noodles must either be in the shape of a cartoon character or the formulation must be enhanced with nutrients that are described as assisting with kids’ growing needs.

Instead, Kids’ Food and Beverages in the U.S., new from Packaged Facts, is broad and complex, spanning numerous categories and market segments, but focusing on products truly targeted to kids. “Kids” might be in the name, the tagline, or in the flagging of “nutrients for proper growth.” They are the kinds of foods and beverages an adult would not otherwise purchase unless there was a kid in the household.

Kids’ Food and Beverages in the U.S. includes an analysis of the market, with historical (2001-2005) and projected (2006-2010) data, and an overview of what products are proving to be winners and losers. Major and upcoming companies, such as Nestle, Kellogg, Stoneyfield Farm, Clif Bar, Kraft, Nature’s Path, Healthy Handfuls, In-Zone Brands, are profiled.

Report Methodology
The information in Kids’ Foods and Beverages in the U.S. is based on both primary and secondary research. Primary research involved on-site examination of the retail milieu, interviews with marketing, public relations and industry analysts within the food market and consultants to the industry. Market size data was derived from Information Resources, Inc. and trade sources. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature. New product information is gathered via literature research, personal interviews and data compiled by ProductScan, a service of Datamonitor. Consumer information was derived from Simmons Market Research Bureau, fall 2005 National Consumer Survey.

What You’ll Get in this Report
Kids’ Foods and Beverages in the U.S. makes important predictions and recommendations regarding the future of this market, and pinpoints ways current and prospective marketers can capitalize on current trends and spearhead new ones. No other market research report provides both the comprehensive analysis and extensive data that Kids’ Foods and Beverages in the U.S. offers. The report addresses the following segments:

  • The Market (including market size and composition, and projected market growth)
  • The Marketers (including discussions of specific marketer brand and market shares)
  • Competitive Profiles (of the mainstream marketers, specialists and up-and-coming niche players, and analyses of the products they market)
  • The Consumer (who’s buying what, and where)
  • The Products
  • Trends and Opportunities

Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is already competing in the kids’ food industry, or is considering making the leap, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current market for kids’ foods and beverages, as well as projected sales and trends through 2010. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of sales data, and a detailed discussion of the consumer for kids food and beverage products.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for kids’ foods and beverages.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for kids’ foods and beverages.
  • Advertising agencies working with clients in the food industry understand the product buyer to develop messages and images that compel consumers to purchase these products.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.


Chapter 1 Executive Summary

  • Scope and Methodology
  • Scope of Report
  • Report Methodology
  • The Products
    • What Makes a Food a Kids’ Food?
    • Making the Cut
    • Candy Is a Treat, Not Food for This Report
    • Forces Shaping the Kids’ Marketplace
    • The Regulatory Environment

  • Size and Growth of the Market
    • 2006 Sales Come in at $15.1 Billion
    • Sales Will Exceed $26.8 Billion by 2011
    • Table 1-1 U.S. Sales of Kids’ Foods and Beverages, 2001-2011 (in millions of dollars)
    • Kids’ Food and Beverages Broken Down into 11 Categories
    • Figure 1-1 U.S. Kids’ Food and Beverage, Dollar Sales and Percent Share by Category, 2006

  • New Products and Trends Driving Market Growth
    • Kids’ Foods and Beverages Are Booming
    • Fewer Ads and Promos Encourages Innovation in Formulations
    • Thanks to Bill, Numerous Healthful Kids’ Drinks Are Rolling Out
    • Youngsters Crave Variety
    • Kids Like to Play with Their Food
    • Packaging Plays a Critical Role in Kids’ Products
    • Nobody’s Cooking, Growing Kids Need Nutrient-Dense Foods
    • Better-for-You Kids’ Products Might Want to Consider Going Organic

  • The Marketers in the Marketplace
    • All Types of Marketers
    • Direct Delivery Advantages
    • The Cost of Face-To-Face Business
    • Advantages of Warehouse Delivery
    • Smaller Marketers Work Through Brokers
    • Different Formats Attract Consumers for Their Varied Needs
    • Where Consumers Buy Kids’ Foods and Beverages
    • Figure 1-2 U.S. Retail Sales of Kids’ Foods and Beverages by Outlet, 2006
    • Kids Have the Power to Increase Retailers’ Profits
    • Natural and Niche Retailers See Value in Kids

  • Marketing to Kids
    • Food Advertising to Kids in the 21st Century
    • Many Options on How to Reach Kids

  • The Consumer
    • Kids’ Population Totals 36 Million
    • Multicultural Kids Are an Important Demographic to Target
    • Demographics Influencing the Market
    • Don’t Underestimate Kids; Many Get It
    • How Appearance Appeals to Kids
    • Gender Preferences with Graphics

Chapter 2 The Products

  • Key Points
  • An Introduction to Kids’ Foods and Beverages
  • What Makes a Food a Kids’ Food?
  • Making the Cut
  • Candy Is a Treat, Not Food for This Report
  • Other Forces Shaping the Kids’ Marketplace
  • Overview of the U.S. Kids Segment
    • Scope of Report
    • Kids Population Totals 36 Million
    • Table 2-1 Kids as Percent of Total U.S. Population, 2004 (in thousands)
    • Table 2-2 Size of Kids Population by Single Year of Age, 2004 (in thousands)
    • Kids Population to Experience Below-Average Growth
    • Table 2-3 Selected Age Groups as Percent of Total Population, 2005 vs. 2010
    • Table 2-4 Projected Growth in the Kids Population by Age Group, 2005 vs. 2010 (in thousands)
    • America’s Kids Live in Wide Variety of Family Environments

  • Government Regulations
    • The Regulatory Environment
    • Labeling Overview
    • Labeling Nomenclature
    • Provide the Facts: Nutritional Information Musts
    • Trans Fats Joined That List in 2006
    • Products that Are Exempt
    • Nutrition Regulations In Foodservice
    • A Variety of Possible Claims
    • Types of Health Claims
    • Health Claims that Meet Significant Scientific Agreement
    • Qualified Health Claims
    • Structure/Function Claims
    • Nutrient Content Claims
    • Allergen Issues
    • Are You Prepared for a Product Recall?

Chapter 3 The Market

  • Key Points
  • 2006 Sales Exceed $15.1 Billion
  • Table 3-1 Total U.S. Sales of Kids’ Foods and Beverages, 2001-2006 in millions of dollars)
  • Figure 3-1 Total U.S. Sales of Kids’ Foods and Beverages, 2001-2006 (in millions of dollars)
  • Once Again, What Makes a Food a Kids’ Food?
  • Assumptions Regarding Sales Volume
  • Candy Is a Treat, Not Food for This Report

  • Market Composition
    • Kids’ Food and Beverages Broken Down Into 11 Categories
    • Table 3-2 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages, Dollar Sales and Percent Share by Category, 2006
    • Figure 3-2 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages, Dollar Sales and Percent Share by Category, 2006
    • Products Also Broken Down By Healthfulness
    • Figure 3-3 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages, Percent Share by Better-for-You Description, 2006
    • Eleven Categories Broken Down Into Sub-Categories
    • Table 3-3 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Beverages, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share, 2006
    • Figure 3-4 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Beverages, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share, 2006
    • Frozen Novelties Drive Frozen Dessert Sales
    • Table 3-4 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Frozen Desserts/Ice Cream/Frozen Novelties, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share, 2006
    • Figure 3-5 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Frozen Desserts/Ice Cream/Frozen Novelties, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share, 2006
    • It’s a Cold Cereal World for Kids
    • Table 3-5 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Cereal, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share, 2006
    • Figure 3-6 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Cereal, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share, 2006
    • Lunch Kits Are Simply Lunch Kits
    • Fake Fruit Is Really More Like Candy
    • Table 3-6 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Sweet Snack Foods, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share, 2006
    • Figure 3-7 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Sweet Snack Foods, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share, 2006
    • It’s a Fifty-Fifty Toss with Cookies and Crackers
    • Meal Time Is Quick and Simple
    • Table 3-7 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Meals/Entrees/Pizza, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share, 2006
    • Figure 3-8 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Meals/Entrees/Pizza, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share, 2006
    • Yogurt Drives the Dairy Category
    • Table 3-8 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Dairy Products, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share, 2006
    • Figure 3-9 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Dairy Products, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share, 2006
    • Salty Snack Foods Run the Gamut
    • When Cereal Does Not Cut It for Breakfast
    • Table 3-9 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Non-Cereal Breakfast Foods, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share, 2006
    • Figure 3-10 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Non-Cereal Breakfast Foods, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share, 2006
    • What Else Qualifies as Being “Kids?”

  • Factors to Market Growth
    • Better-for-You Was Identified as Growth Driver
    • The 2004 Report Was Right on Target
    • The Regulatory World Is Encouraging Better-for-You Innovations
    • School Rules Influence Better-for-You Kids’ Beverages
    • Youngsters Crave Variety
    • Nobody’s Cooking; Growing Kids Need Nutrient-Dense Foods
    • Healthier Snacks Come in Many Forms and Flavors
    • Kids Continue to Crave Extreme, and Often Get into Exotic
    • The Classroom Melting Pot
    • Parents Might Start to Embrace Alternative Sweeteners
    • Better-for-You Kids’ Products Might Want to Consider Going Organic

  • Projected Market Growth
    • Sales Surpass $26.8 Billion by 2011
    • Table 3-10 Projected Total U.S. Sales of Kids’ Foods and Beverages, 2007-2011 (in millions of dollars)
    • Figure 3-11 Projected Total U.S. Sales of Kids’ Foods and Beverages, 2007-2011 (in millions of dollars)
    • Finally, Better-for-You Is What Drives the Kids’ Market
    • Figure 3-12 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages, Percent Share by Better-for-You Description, 2006

    Chapter 4 The Marketers

    • Key Points
    • All Types of Marketers
    • The Five Leading Marketers
    • Table 4-1 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Five Leading Marketers and Kids’ Brands, 2006
    • It’s the Smaller Players That Are Innovators
    • Where Many Marketers Are Putting Their Efforts
    • Competitive Overview
      • IRI Data Is Not Available for Most Marketers
      • Juices and Fruit Drinks—Sugar Contents Negatively Impacting Sales
      • Table 4-2 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Select Brands of Juice/Fruit Drinks, Dollar Sales, 2001-2006 (in millions of dollars)
      • Dairy’s Healthful Halo Helps Drinkable Yogurt Sales
      • Table 4-3 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Select Brands of Drinkable Yogurt, Dollar Sales, 2001-2006 (in millions of dollars)
      • Naturally Free of Sugar and Calories, Water Sales Boom
      • Table 4-4 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Bottled Water, Dollar Sales, 2001-2006 (in millions of dollars)
      • Lunch Kits Need a Healthful Makeover
      • Table 4-5 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Lunch Kits, Dollar Sales, 2001-2006 (in millions of dollars)
      • Frozen Kids’ Foods Talk Convenience and Nutrition
      • Table 4-6 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Frozen Foods, Dollar Sales, 2001-2006 (in millions of dollars)
      • Bars For Kids Is Challenging
      • Table 4-7 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Bars, Dollar Sales, 2001-2006 (in millions of dollars)

    • The Marketplace Players
      • An Overview of Some Up-and-Comers
      • Caffe D’Amore, Inc., Monrovia, California
      • Country Choice Organic, Eden Prairie, Minnesota
      • Imagination Farms, LLC, Indianapolis, Indiana
      • The Immaculate Baking Co., Flat Rock, North Carolina

    • Competitive Profile: Clif Bar Inc., Berkeley, California
      • Company Overview
      • Serving the Earth
      • ZBaR Is Conceived
      • ZBaR and Project Fit Team Up

    • Competitive Profile: Bravo! Foods International Corp., North Palm Beach, Florida
      • Company Overview
      • Milk with an Attitude
      • New Products on the Forefront

    • Competitive Profile: ConAgra Foods, Inc., Omaha, Nebraska
      • Company Overview
      • Winning Combination of Flavor and Fun Brings Kids to the Table
      • New Grip-n-Dip Chicken Strips Bound to Be a Favorite

    • Competitive Profile: CoolBrands International, Inc., Ronkonkoma, New York
      • Company Overview
      • How the Company Came to Be CoolBrands
      • Gaining Some Culture, Cultured Products That Is
      • Licensing Kids’ Brands
      • Getting Better for Kids
      • A Whole New Category: Frozen Yogurt for Breakfast

    • Competitive Profile: The Dannon Co., Inc., White Plains, New York
      • Company Overview
      • Daniel Brings Dannon to America
      • Returning to France Brings Changes to U.S. Business
      • Dannon Returns to Groupe Danone
      • Dannon Is a Family Brand
      • With Many Kids’ Products
      • Dannon Water Goes to Coke

    • Competitive Profile: General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota
      • Company Overview
      • Cereal-to-Go—Breakfast Bars Debut
      • Healthful Kids Advertising
      • Cascadian’s Clifford Appeals to Kids
      • Yoplait Is Big with Kids of All Ages
      • Less Sugar for Young Kids
      • Always Supporting Kids, Box Tops for Education Turns 10 Years Old

    • Competitive Profile: Healthy Handfuls, LLC, Grass Valley, California
      • Company Overview
      • Single-Serve Healthy Handfuls

    • Competitive Profile: In-Zone Brands, Inc., Austell, Georgia
      • Company Overview
      • The Company Tickles Easily

    • Competitive Profile: Kellogg Co., Battle Creek, Michigan
      • Company Overview
      • Kellogg, Always the Innovator
      • Fruit Snacking Gets Twisted
      • Cereal Gets Mighty For Growing Kids

    • Competitive Profile: Kraft Foods Inc., Northfield, Illinois
      • Company Overview
      • Helping Kids Get Sensible with Lunch
      • The Sensible Solution Logo
      • Back to Nature with Sensible Snacks
      • About Back to Nature
      • A Year Earlier Mainstream Kraft-Nabisco Rolled Out Sensible Snack Packs
      • Macaroni & Cheese Goes Super

    • Competitive Profile: My Family Farm, Fort Thomas, New Jersey
      • Company Overview
      • All in the Family
      • Family’s Kids’ Products
      • Really, These Snacks Are Down From the Farm
      • And if City Flavors Are Preferred . . .

    • Competitive Profile: Nature’s Path Foods., Inc., Richmond, British Columbia, Canada
      • Company Overview
      • A Company Built On Whole Grains
      • Products Formulated for and Helping . . . Kids
      • Ready-to-Eat Cereals
      • Frozen Waffles
      • Cereal Bars
      • Animal Cookies

    • Competitive Profile: Nestlé USA, Inc., Glendale, California
      • Company Overview
      • Getting Kid-Friendly Milk in the Right Place
      • Nestlé Invites Ice Cream Fans of All Ages to Stick Up for Kids with Cancer
      • 100% Juice, Does It Really Matter for Kids?

    • Competitive Profile: Stonyfield Farm, Londonderry, New Hampshire
      • Company Overview
      • Strong Beliefs in Yogurt’s Benefits and the Environment
      • Stonyfield Says It Has Kids in Mind
      • Stonyfield Puts Parents to the Organic Lunchbox Challenge
      • Stonyfield Embraces the Famous Purple Dinosaur
      • Leaders in Vending Machine Makeover

    • Company Profile: Waddajuice LLC, Westport, Connecticut
      • Company Overview
      • What’s WaddaJuice? What About WaddaBlast?

    Chapter 5 Marketing Overview

    • Key Points
    • Food Advertising to Kids in the 21st Century
    • Many Options on How to Reach Kids
    • Background on Marketing to Kids
    • Here’s the Problem
    • Groups Take Action
    • CARU Says It Will Review the Situation
    • FTC and HHC Send a Message to CARU
    • CSPI Reacts to FTC/HHS Report
    • Clinton Helps in the Marketing of Beverages in Schools
    • Before Clinton, There’s New Jersey’s Approach
    • The Internet’s Role in All of This
    • Online Food Advertising Studied
    • Table 5-1 Web Sites of Top Kids Food Marketers, Identified by Kaiser Foundation Study, 2005
    • Top Line Data from the Report
    • Television Advertising Online
    • Nutrition Information
    • Incentive for Product Purchases
    • Memberships, Registration, and Marketing Research
    • Extending the Online Experience Offline
    • Educational Information
    • Website Protections for Children
    • Sweepstakes and Promotions
    • How Big Is Online Advertising?
    • Two Key Categories of Advertising Claims
    • Brand Benefit Claims
    • Table 5-2 Brand Benefit Claims on Advergaming Internet Sites: Top-10 Benefit Claims, 2005
    • Sweets Tend to Make the Most Claims
    • Table 5-3 Brand Benefit Claims on Advergaming Internet Sites: Top-10 Product Categories, 2005
    • Nutrition Claims
    • Table 5-4 Nutrition Claims on Advergaming Internet Sites, 2005
    • Nutrition Claims Vary by Product Category
    • Table 5-5 Nutrition Claims on Advergaming Internet Sites: Top-10 Product Categories, 2005
    • Responses to the Study
    • Kraft Creates a Trail of Positive Messages
    • Kraft Does Not Always Smile When It Makes Changes
    • Not Everyone Sees Kraft as a Model Marketer
    • Other Food Marketers Incorporate Kids’ Health into Marketing
    • Skippy Peanut Butter
    • Subway Restaurants
    • Happy Meals
    • Kids’ TV Responds to Critics
    • CSPI Responds, Too
    • Responses to the Threatened Law Suit
    • A Bill Sitting on Capital Hill
    • How to Market Your Product to Kids
    • Here Are Some Marketing Guidelines
    • Beverages
    • Foods
    • Table 5-6 Criteria for Foods Marketed to Kids
    • Portion Size Limits
    • Marketing Techniques
    • Product Characteristics and Overall Messages
    • Specific Marketing Techniques and Incentives
    • Additional Guidance for Schools
    • Additional Guidance for Retail Stores

    Chapter 6: The Marketplace

    • Key Points
    • Retail Distribution Methods
      • Direct Delivery Advantages
      • The Cost of Face-To-Face Business
      • Advantages of Warehouse Delivery
      • Smaller Marketers Work Through Brokers

    • Where Consumers Are Shopping These Days
      • Shopping Options Are Plentiful
      • So Where Are Consumers Shopping?
      • Different Types of Retail Outlets
      • Different Formats Attract Consumers for Their Varied Needs
      • Channel Blurring Continues to Grow
      • Traditional Supermarkets Down in Number
      • Just How Much Can a Store Carry?
      • Who Are the Leading Retailers?
      • Table 6-1 Top-Five U.S. Discount-Style Food Store Chains, by Dollar Sales and Store Count, 2005
      • Table 6-2 Top-Three U.S. Niche-Style Food Store Chains, by Dollar Sales and Store Count, 2005
      • Whole Foods Market, Inc. Austin, Texas
      • Trader Joe’s Company, Inc. Monrovia, California
      • Wild Oats Markets, Inc. Boulder, Colorado
      • Where Consumers Buy Kids’ Foods and Beverages
      • Figure 6-1 U.S. Retail Sales of Kids’ Foods and Beverages by Outlet, 2006
      • Never Under Price
      • And Don’t Let Retailers Over Price Your Products
      • Table 6-3 Retail Price of Select Kids’ Foods and Beverages, by Marketer/Brand, Description/Product Size/Varieties, and Price/Retail Outlet, 2006
      • Warehouse Clubs
      • Multi-Packs and Family-Size Products
      • Table 6-4 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Suggested Club-Store Prices of Selected Products, 2006
      • Private Label Offers Price Breaks
      • Table 6-5 U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Private Label vs. Branded (Comparative Retail Price of String Cheese), 2006

    • Retailers’ Efforts in Marketing to Kids
      • Kids Have the Power to Increase Retailers’ Profits
      • Natural and Niche Retailers See Value in Kids
      • Table 6-6 Select Whole Foods Kids Organic Products, by Product, Product Size/Varieties, and Price, 2006
      • Check Out These Aisles
      • Direct Nutrition Messages to Shoppers
      • Family-Friendly Shopping at Whole Foods
      • What Other Chains Made the List?
      • 1. Wegmans Food Markets, Inc., Rochester, New York
      • 2. Giant Eagle, Inc., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
      • 3. Publix Super Markets, Inc., Lakeland, Florida
      • 4. Ukrop’s Super Markets, Inc., Richmond, Virginia
      • 5. Harris Teeter, Inc., Matthews, North Carolina
      • 6. Hy-Vee, Inc., West Des Moines, Iowa
      • 7. Whole Foods Market, Inc., Austin, Texas
      • 8. Farmer Jack Supermarkets, Detroit, Michigan
      • 9. Wild Oats Markets, Inc., Boulder, Colorado
      • 10. (tie) IGA (Independent Grocers Alliance), Inc., Chicago, Illinois
      • 10. (tie) Raley’s, Inc., West Sacramento, California

    • Foodservice Vendors’ Efforts in Marketing to Kids
      • Menus Get Upgraded
      • The Fast Food Milk Story
      • Even Kids’ Meals Toys Speak to Health
      • Upscale Restaurants Upgrade, Too
      • Panera Introduces Kids’ Menu with Organic and All-Natural Offerings
      • Denny’s D-Zone Ready for Takeoff!
      • Disney Loses Its Appetite for Happy Meal Tie-Ins
      • To Prove It’s Into Health . . . McD’s Opens a Kids’ Gym

    • School Foodservice Efforts in Marketing to Kids
      • Schools Begin Initiatives to Improve Student’ Diets
      • ConAgra’s Ultragrain Appears in Nebraska Schools
      • Healthful School Foods Are Catching On
      • Vending Machines Go Organic
      • President Clinton Expels Soda from Public Schools
      • Nestlé Introduces Soda Alternative for 2006-2007 School Year
      • An Overview of the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act
      • Here’s a Good One for Parents Who Need to Know All

    Chapter 7 The Consumer

    • Key Points
    • Kids’ Population Totals 36 Million
    • Table 7-1 Size of Kids’ Population by Single Year of Age, 2004 (in thousands)
    • Table 7-2 Kids as Percent of Total U.S. Population, 2004 (in thousands)
    • Boys Predominate in Kids’ Population
    • Table 7-3 Percent of Males and Females by Selected Age Groups, 2004
    • Kids’ Population to Experience Below-Average Growth
    • Table 7-4 Selected Age Groups as Percent of Total Population, 2005 vs. 2010
    • Table 7-5 Projected Growth in the Kids Population by Age Group, 2005 vs. 2010 (in thousands)
    • Multicultural Kids Now More than 40% of Kids Population
    • Table 7-6 Population of Three- to 11-Year-Olds by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2004 (in thousands)
    • Table 7-7 Non-Hispanic Whites and Multicultural Population Groups as Percent of U.S. Population by Age Group, 2004
    • Table 7-8 Race and Hispanic Origin of Three- to 11-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2004 (in thousands)
    • Population of Multicultural Kids Will Grow in Importance
    • Table 7-9 Growth of the Population of Kids Under the Age of 14, Hispanics vs. Other Population Groups, 2005 vs. 2010 (in thousands)

  • Attitudes and Consumer Behavior
    • What’s Going on with Today’s Kids and Their Family Unit
    • America’s Kids Live in Wide Variety of Family Environments
    • Family Environment of Kids Varies by Race, Education, and Income
    • Kids Still Value Family
    • Kids Attend School at Younger Ages
    • Older Kids Lose Interest in School
    • When Do “Kids” Become “Tweens”?

  • Eating-Out Habits
    • African American Kids Frequent Favorite Fast Food Restaurants
    • College Educated Parents Less Likely to Indulge Kids
    • Affluent Kids Have More Impact on Parents’ Brand Choices
    • Table 7-10 Percent of Six- to 11-Year-Olds Who Get to Choose Restaurants Most/Some of the Time by Demographic Characteristic
    • Fast Food Remains Universally Popular Among Kids
    • Table 7-11 Visits to Fast Food and Family Restaurants in Last 30 Days by Six- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
    • Tween Girls Most Likely to Go to Favorite Fast Food Joint
    • Table 7-12 Percent of Six- to 11-Year-Olds Visiting Favorite Fast Food Restaurant by Gender and Age Group
    • Older Kids Look for Good Food, Younger Kids for Good Toys
    • Table 7-13 Reasons Why Six- to 11-Year-Olds Pick Favorite Fast Food Restaurant by Gender and Age Group

  • Kids, Parents, and Advertising
    • Simmons’ Data on Advertising Attitudes
    • Table 7-14 Attitudes Toward Advertising to Six- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
    • Kids in More Affluent Households Less Susceptible to Ads
    • Table 7-15 Percent of Six- to 11-Year-Olds with Select Ad Receptivity by Demographic Characteristic
    • Parental Attitudes Toward Advertising to Kids Vary Widely
    • Table 7-16 Attitudes of Parents Toward Advertising to Children by Demographic Characteristic
    • Parents of Preschoolers More Negative Toward Advertising
    • Table 7-17 Attitudes of Parents Toward Advertising to Children by Age and Gender of Children
    • Even Preschoolers Have Impact on Parents’ Choice of Brands
    • Figure 7-1 Percent of Parents Saying Their Kids Have a Significant Impact on Brands by Age of Children

  • Food Spending and Consumption Trends
    • More Family Dollars Spent on Food for Older Kids
    • Table 7-18 Total Annual Family Expenditures on Food for Three- to 11-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2004
    • Changing Food Patterns in America
    • Concerns about Child Obesity Affect Kids’ Market
    • Figure 7-2 Prevalence of Overweight Children, Ages 6 to 11
    • Prevalence of Overweight Children on the Rise

  • Kids’ Understanding of Food and Nutrition
    • Today’s Nutrition Savvy Consumer
    • Don’t Underestimate Kids; Many Get It
    • Table 7-19 Foods Kids Love and Hate
    • Kids and Snacking: What Pleases Parents?
    • Methodology
    • Responses
    • Table 7-20 Parental Values When Choosing Their Child’s Snack
    • Table 7-21 Parents Rate Snack Healthfulness
    • Kids and Snacking: What Works with Kids?
    • Responses
    • Table 7-22 Rating a Snack’s Healthfulness, Parents vs. Kids
    • Prepared Foods’ Tips on What Manufacturers Can Do
    • Kids Have Opinions on Healthful Foods
    • Table 7-23 Kids’ Opinions on Healthful Foods

  • What Kids Want
    • What Motivates Kids When It Comes to Food
    • Kids Want Fun Ingredients Added to Their Foods
    • How Appearance Appeals to Kids
    • Gender Preferences with Graphics

  • Simmons Consumer Survey
    • What the Numbers Say
    • Households with Tweens Like to Bake
    • Table 7-24 Percent of U.S. Households Using Select Baking Products, 2005
    • Beverage Use Varies by Age of Kids
    • Table 7-25 Percent of U.S. Households Using Select Beverages, 2005
    • Condiment Use High Overall
    • Table 7-26 Percent of U.S. Households Using Select Condiments, 2005
    • Kids Use Dairy
    • Table 7-27 Percent of U.S. Households Using Select Dairy Products, 2005
    • Freezer Foods Equate to Convenience
    • Table 7-28 Percent of U.S. Households Using Select Frozen Foods, 2005
    • Sweet, Grain-Based Foods Are Popular with Tweens
    • Table 7-29 Percent of U.S. Households Using Select Grain-Based Products, 2005
    • Lunch Kits Come Into Play with Age
    • Table 7-30 Percent of U.S. Households Using Select Refrigerated Meats, 2005
    • Sloppy Fiesta Time
    • Table 7-31 Percent of U.S. Households Using Select Shelf-Stable Grocery Items, 2005
    • Snack Foods Rule with Tweens
    • Table 7-32 Percent of U.S. Households Using Select Snack Foods, 2005

    Chapter 8 New Products and Trends

    • Key Points
    • Kids’ Foods and Beverages Are Booming
    • Table 8-1 Total Number of SKUs Introduced to the U.S. Marketplace Targeted to Kids, 2001-2005
    • Table 8-1 [Cont.] Total Number of SKUs Introduced to the U.S. Marketplace Targeted to Kids, 2001-2005
    • Top-10 Categories Typically Are Very Popular Among Kids
    • Figure 8-1 Top-10 Categories of Total Number of SKUs Introduced to the U.S. Marketplace Targeted to Kids, 2001-2005
    • Products Sport Many Tags and Claims
    • Table 8-2 Total Number of Product Lines Introduced to the U.S. Marketplace Targeted to Kids, by Tag or Claim on Packages, 2001-2005
    • Table 8-3 Top-10 Tags or Claims on U.S. Foods and Beverages Targeted to Kids, 2001-2005
    • Strawberry Is the Most Frequently Cited Flavor in the Kids’ Market
    • Table 8-4 Total Number of SKUs Introduced to the U.S. Marketplace Targeted to Kids, by Flavor, 2001-2005
    • Table 8-4 [Cont.] Total Number of SKUs Introduced to the U.S. Marketplace Targeted to Kids, by Flavor, 2001-2005
    • Table 8-5 Top-10 Flavors on U.S. Foods and Beverages Targeted to Kids, 2001-2005

  • Trends Driving Innovation
    • Fewer Ads and Promos Encourages Innovation in Formulations
    • Industry Is Urged to Innovate More Nutritious Foods for Kids
    • Thanks to Bill, Numerous Healthful Kids’ Drinks Are Rolling Out
    • Water and Milk Make Moms Happy
    • Youngsters Crave Variety
    • Kids Like to Play with Their Food
    • Packaging Plays a Critical Role in Kids’ Products
    • Getting Kids to Eat Their Veggies
    • On-the-Go Kids Drive Portable Nutrition
    • Nobody’s Cooking, Growing Kids Need Nutrient-Dense Foods
    • Healthier Snacks Come in Many Forms and Flavors
    • Kids Continue to Crave Extreme, and Often Get into Exotic
    • Talk About a Melting Pot—Just Look Inside a Classroom
    • Kids Like Lots of Color, Too
    • Parents Might Start to Embrace Alternative Sweeteners
    • Will These Sweeteners Show Up at Bake Sales?
    • Better-for-You Kids’ Products Might Want to Consider Going Organic
    • Key to Success
    • What Are We Seeing in 2006
    • Table 8-6 Total Number of Product Lines and SKUs Introduced to the U.S. Marketplace Targeted to Kids, January to July 2006
    • 2006 Is All About Extra Vitamins
    • Table 8-7 Total Number of Product Lines Introduced to the U.S. Marketplace Targeted to Kids, by Tag or Claim on Packages, January to July 2006
    • Strawberry Remains Number-One Flavor
    • Table 8-8 Top-10 Flavors on U.S. Foods and Beverages Targeted to Kids, January to July, 2006
    • New Products Reviewed

  • New Product Overview
    • Once a Kids’ Favorite, Always a Favorite
    • Kraft Expands Sensible Solutions for Kids’ Meals
    • The Kids’ Beverage Aisle Undergoes a Transformation
    • Plop, Plop, Fizz, Fizz
    • Milk Beverage Innovations Are at an All-Time High
    • First There Was Eatertainment, Now There’s Drinkertainment
    • More Kids’ Juices Become 100% and Boosted with Healthful Extras
    • Snack Foods-a-Plenty
    • Fruit Snacks, Once For Kids, Always For Kids
    • Surgeon Creates Revolutionary Snack to Fight Childhood Obesity
    • Back to Breakfast—The Most Important Meal of the Day
    • Zoe Foods Is First to Offer Nut-Free Zoe’s O’s Cereal
    • More Medical Intervention
    • What About a Mid-Morning Snack?
    • Puddings and Ice Cream Are Made with Milk, Too
    • Speaking of Crayola . . .
    • That’s Right, Kids Like Fun
    • And They Will Always Like Cookies
    • Of Course, There’s the Inevitable, Kids Love Candy
    • Back to Reality, Good Nutrition Is the Trend in 2006 and Beyond
    • Getting Kids to Eat Their Fruits and Veggies
    • A Closing Note on Meals
    • Beverages to Build Kids’ Immunity
    • Better-For-You Foodservice Beverages
    • Table 8-9 Select New Kids’ Foods and Beverages, 2006

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