Market Research Logo

Marketing to the Internet Generation

This completely new Packaged Facts report offers a comprehensive analysis of the demographic characteristics, purchasing power and consumer behavior of the Internet Generation; the 86 million Americans between the ages of 2 and 23 who have grown up with the Internet for all or a significant part of their lives. The report analyzes the distinctive characteristics of the Internet Generation, including their life experiences, values, consumer behavior and media usage. Factors affecting the growth of the market are assessed and the size and growth of the online and offline market are estimated. The report provides overviews of marketing and promotional strategies targeting various segments of the Internet Generation and includes a detailed evaluation of key demographic features of each segment.


Scope of Report

The Internet Generation is defined as including individuals who have spent at least 20% of their lifetimes after the age of 2 potentially exposed to the Internet. The dawn of the Internet era was 1995, when at-home access to the Internet began to be increasingly widespread through consumer-oriented Internet service providers. The oldest members of the Internet Generation are 24 years of age in 2000, and the youngest members are kids over the age of 2.

This Packaged Facts analysis concentrates on members of the Internet Generation who have access to the Internet at their place of residence. The following four segments of the Internet Generation are analyzed:

  • The Kids Segment of the Internet Generation includes those ages 2 to 7 years with at-home Internet access.
  • The Tweens Segment includes those in the 8- to 13-year-old age group with Internet access at home.
  • The Teens Segment includes 14- to 17-year-olds with Internet access at home.
  • The College Segment focuses on analyzing the market represented by full-time students at four-year colleges who have Internet access at their place of residence.

Methodology

This report is based on information collected through interviews with industry executives, a comprehensive review of Web sites geared toward kids, tweens, teens, and college students, and an extensive survey of published materials. U.S. government sources included data from the U.S. Census Bureau, National Telecommunications and Information Administration, and the National Center for Education Statistics. Other sources include a wide range of journals covering the marketing and advertising fields.

Categories Covered:

  • Kids – Ages 2-7
  • Tweens – Ages 8-13
  • Teens – Ages 14-17
  • College – Ages 18-24 Attending College

Issues Addressed:

  • Current And Projected Market Growth
  • Factors Promoting Market Growth
  • Limitations To Market Growth
  • Market Definition
  • Key Demographic Features
  • Media Usage By Category
  • Life Experiences And Values
  • Consumer Behavior
  • Online Population Growth
  • The “E-Wallet”
  • Defining Youth Brand Loyalty
  • Influence Of Fads In Marketing
  • “Convergence Marketing” Strategies
  • Marketing Strategies By Category
  • Computer & Internet Usage By Category
  • Favorite Web Sites By Category

Tables And Graphs:

  • Demographic Features By Race, Age, Income
  • Weekly Exposure To Various Media
  • Preferred Media
  • Attitudes Toward Computers Vs. Tv
  • Selected E-Wallet Sites

Companies/Sites Discussed:

  • Alfy.Com
  • Allowancenet
  • Alloy.Com
  • Clairol
  • Collegeclub.Com
  • Eplay.Com
  • Fleet Financial Group
  • Foxkids.Com
  • Freescholarships.Com
  • Freezone.Com
  • General Mills
  • Go Kids Center
  • Headbone
  • Icanbuy
  • Iexchange.Com
  • Iturf
  • Kellogg
  • Mamamedia.Com
  • Memolink.Com
  • Minute Maid
  • Nabisco
  • Nike
  • Pepsico
  • Procter & Gamble
  • Quaker Oats
  • Reebok
  • Sesame Workshop
  • Snowball.Com
  • Teen.Com
  • Toymax
  • Troublewear.Com
  • Yahoo
  • Zeeks.Com

Hours of Research: 700

  1. Executive Summary

    Introduction

      Background
      Overview of Report

    Scope and Methodology

      Scope of Report
      Methodology

    Overview of the Internet Generation

      Internet Generation Has 42.5 Million Members with At-Home Internet Access
      Internet Generation Households Have High Incomes and Two Parents
      Computers Still Trail Other Media but TV Begins to Lose Ground
      Internet Generation Expects Active Media Engagement
      Distinct Values Affect Consumer Behavior of the Internet Generation

    Survey of the Market

      Analysts See Cause for Optimism
      But Obstacles Remain
      Number of Internet Generation Families Will Grow at Rapid Rate
      Aggregate Income of Internet Generation Families Exceeds $1.3 Trillion
      Online Expenditures of Kids, Tweens, and Teens Expected to Top $4 Billion in 2004
      Online Expenditures by 18- to 24-Year-Olds Projected to Exceed $10 Billion in 2004
      Online Purchases by College Segment Will Exceed $2 Billion in 2004
      Nearly 66 Million Members of Internet Generation Expected to Be Online at Home in 2004
      Total Online Expenditures Will Exceed $14 Billion

    Marketing and Advertising Strategies

      E-Marketers Need to Break through Internet Generation Defenses
      Opinions Differ on How to Promote Teen E-Commerce
      Teens Expect Retailers to Synchronize Online Marketing with Bricks-and-Mortar Facilities
      E-Commerce Sites for Kids and Teens Need to Meet Basic Expectations
      Internet Remains Only One of Many Marketing Tools
      Contests and Giveaways Drive Many Online Promotions
      Street Marketing Techniques Extended to the Internet
      Teens Web Sites Face Shakeout
      Permission Marketing Gains Ground
      Schools Become Promotional Partners

    The Kids Segment of the Internet Generation

      Young Kids in Internet Generation Total 23.2 Million
      Internet Access Available to 4.8 Million Young Kids
      TV Still Dominates Media Usage by Young Kids but Core Group of Computer-Users Grows
      Toy Sites Try to Tap into Expectations of Internet Generation Kids
      Marketers Begin to Use Web to Get Kids' Attention
      Kids Sites Try to Combine E-Commerce with Education

    The Tweens Segment of the Internet Generation

      More than 10 Million Tweens Have Access to the Internet at Home
      Television Gets the Most Media Attention
      Games and E-Mail Outpace Shopping
      Many Parents Closely Supervise Online Tweens
      Parents Object to Online Buying by Tweens
      McDonald's Uses Special Web Site to Reach Tweens
      Disney Tries to Capture Attention of Tweens with Enhanced Web Site

    The Teens Segment of the Internet Generation

      Teens Most Likely to Have Computer at Home
      More than 8 Million Have Internet Access at Home
      Multitasking Common
      Online Shopping Still Has Low Priority but Internet Plays Role in Teen Spending
      Internet Banner Ads Bother Teens
      Internet Is Key Component of Teens Marketing Programs

    The College Segment of the Internet Generation

      College Students Remain Elite Group
      College Students Are Webcentric
      College Students Are Big E-Spenders
      Surveys Generally Agree on Most Popular Online Purchases
      Internet Helps Marketers in Hard-to-Reach College Market
      Marketers Use Offline Promotions to Build Online Traffic
      Marketers Push Envelope to Create Successful Online Promotions
      Textbook Marketers and Membership Programs Top College Sites
  2. Overview of the Internet Generation

    Market Definition

      The Internet Generation Defined
      Table 2-1: The Internet Generation: by Year of Birth and Length of Internet Exposure, 1976-1998
      Echo Boomers Form the Core of the Internet Generation
      At-Home Internet Access Key Criterion
      Packaged Facts Analyzes Four Segments of the Internet Generation

    Key Demographic Features

      Nearly 90 Million Members of the Internet Generation
      Table 2-2: The Echo Boom Generation: by Age Group and Gender, 1999
      Non-Hispanic Whites Remain Largest Component of Echo Boomers
      Table 2-3: The Echo Boom Generation: by Race and Hispanic Origin, 1999
      More than 45 Million Members of Internet Generation Have At-Home Internet Access
      Table 2-4: Number of Echo Boomers with Internet Access at Place of Residence, 1999
      Internet Generation Households Have High Incomes
      Table 2-5: Percent of U.S. Households Using the Internet at Home: by Race and Hispanic Origin and by Income, 1998
      Internet Generation Kids Live in High-Income Neighborhoods
      Table 2-6: Availability of Computer and Internet Access at Home: by Community Income
      Internet Generation Kids Tend to Live in Two-Parent Households
      Table 2-7: Percent of U.S. Households (with Child) Using the Internet at Home: by Household Type, Income, and Race and Hispanic Origin, 1998
      High-Income Families Over-represented in Internet Generation
      Table 2-8: Number of Families with Children with Internet Access
      vs. Number of All Families with Children
      Internet Generation Includes Large Number of Middle-Income Families
      Table 2-9: Families with Children with Internet Access: by Income Level

    Media Usage by the Internet Generation

      Computers Still Trail Other Media
      Table 2-10: Amount of Weekly Time 2- to 18-Year-Olds Exposed to Various Media
      Table 2-11: Proportion of Time Each Medium Contributes to Total Media Budget: Ages 2 to 18
      But TV Begins to Lose Ground
      Tweens and Teens Place Highest Value on Computers and Internet
      Table 2-12: Preferred Media of 8-to 18-Year-Olds
      Table 2-13: Attitudes of 8- to-18-Year-Olds Toward Benefits of Computers vs. TV
      Multimedia Usage and Multi-tasking Routine
      Internet Generation Expects Active Media Engagement
      Youngest "Speeders" Prefer E-Mail to the Phone
      Internet Generation Will Spend One-Third of Lives on the Net

    Life Experiences and Values of the Internet Generation

      Echo Boomers Know Only Unprecedented Prosperity
      Tweens Worldview Described
      Distinct Values Define the Internet Generation
      Diversity Seen as Normal
      Teens Expect To Be Wealthier than Their Parents
      Girls More Socially Concerned than Boys

    Consumer Behavior of the Internet Generation

      Echo Boomer Values Shape Consumer Behavior
      Internet Generation Shoppers Want Things Their Own Way
      Internet Generation Wants to Find Things Out on Their Own
      Internet Generation Demands Authenticity from Marketers
      Echo Boomers Are Smart Shoppers
  3. Survey of the Market

    Factors Promoting Market Growth

      The Broadband Wiring of America Accelerates
      Online Population Will Grow Rapidly
      E-Commerce Hopes Remain High
      Wider Availability of "E-Wallet" Sites Will Facilitate Market Growth
      Table 3-1: Selected E-Wallet Sites, by Target Age Group and Features
      DoughNet.com Offers Financial Services to Teens
      DoughNet.com Offers ATM Card
      DoughNet.com and Harris Interactive Team Up
      RocketCash Enables Teens to Shop Online
      RocketCash Creates Online Currency Exchange
      RocketCash Expands E-Commerce to Latino Community
      Cybermoola Provides Teens with Pre-paid Cards
      Cybermoola and Footaction Form Alliance
      PocketCard Offers Teens Visa Spending Card
      Alloy Online and PocketCard Team Up

    Factors Limiting Market Growth

      Most Kids and Teens Still Lead Traditional Lives off the Internet
      Younger Members of the Internet Generation Face Obstacles to Online Buying
      Many Teens Find E-Shopping Pale Imitation of Real Thing
      Echo Boomers Continue to Frustrate E-Commerce Strategies
      Online Victimization of Tweens and Teens Becomes an Issue
      Parental Concerns Begin to Be Heard
      Government Regulation Starts to Affect Online Kids and Teens

    Size and Growth of the Kids Segment of the Internet Generation Market

      Young Kids Will Become Larger Component of Internet Generation Market
      Internet Generation Kids Market Will Increase Five-Fold
      Table 3-2: Projected Growth in the Number and Annual Expenditures by or for Kids Ages 2-7 Shopping Online, 1999-2004

    Size and Growth of the Tweens Segment of the Internet Generation Market

      Online Buying by Tweens Expected to Increase Substantially by 2004
      Table 3-3: Projected Growth in the Number and Annual Expenditures of Tweens Ages 8-13 Shopping Online, 1999-2004

    Size and Growth of the Teens Segment of the Internet Generation Market

      Online Buying by Teens Expected to Increase Eight-Fold by 2004
      Table 3-4: Projected Growth in the Number and Annual Expenditures of Teens Ages 14-17 Shopping Online, 1999-2004

    Size and Growth of the College Segment of the Internet Generation Market

      Online Purchases by College Segment Will Exceed $2 Billion in 2004
      Table 3-5: Projected Growth in the Number and Online Expenditures of Full-Time Students at Four-Year Colleges with Internet Access at Place of Residence, 1999-2004

    Size and Growth of the Total U.S. Market for the Internet Generation

      Number of Internet Generation Families Will Grow at Rapid Rate
      Table 3-6: Projected Growth in the Number of Families with Children Ages 2-17 and with Internet Access at Home, 1999-2004
      Nearly All High-Income Families Will Have Internet Access at Home in 2004
      Table 3-7: Projected Growth in the Number of Families with Children Ages 2-17 and with Internet Access at Home: Family Income over $75,000, 1999-2004
      Middle-Income Families Will Be Largest Segment of Internet Generation Families
      Table 3-8: Projected Growth in the Number of Families with Children Ages 2-17 and with Internet Access at Home: Family Income $35,000 to $74,999, 1999-2004
      Internet Access at Home Will Grow Most Rapidly in Low-Income Families
      Table 3-9: Projected Growth in the Number of Families with Children Ages 2-17 and with Internet Access at Home: Family Income Under $35,000, 1999-2004
      Aggregate Income of Internet Generation Families Exceeds $1.3 Trillion
      Table 3-10: Aggregate Income of Families with Children Ages 2-17
      and with Access to the Internet at Home, 1999
      Aggregate Income of Internet Generation Families Will Nearly Double by 2004
      Table 3-11: Projected Growth in the Aggregate Income of Families with Children Ages 2-17 and with Access to the Internet at Home, 1999-2004
      Internet Generation Kids, Tweens, and Teens with Internet Access at Home Will Total 44.7 Million in 2004
      Table 3-12: Projected Growth in the Number of Children Ages 2-17 with Internet Access at Home, 1999-2004
      Online Expenditures of Kids, Tweens, and Teens Expected to Top $4 Billion in 2004
      Table 3-13: Projected Growth in the Number and Annual Expenditures of Members of the Internet Generation Ages 2-17 Shopping Online, 1999-2004
      Online Young Adult Population Ages 18 to 24 Likely to Grow
      Nearly 50%
      Table 3-14: Projected Growth in the Number of Individuals Ages 18-24 with Internet Access at Place of Residence, 1999-2004
      Online Expenditures by 18- to 24-Year-Olds Projected to Exceed $10 Billion in 2004
      Table 3-15: Projected Growth in the Number and Annual Expenditures of Members of the Internet Generation Ages 18-24 Shopping Online, 1999-2004
      Nearly 66 Million Members of Internet Generation Expected to Be Online at Home in 2004
      Table 3-16: Projected Growth in the Number of Individuals Ages 2-24 with Internet Access at Place of Residence, 1999-2004
      Total Online Expenditures Will Exceed $14 Billion
      Table 3-17: Projected Growth in the Number and Annual Expenditures of Members of the Internet Generation Ages 2-24 Shopping Online, 1999-2004
  4. Marketing and Advertising Strategies

    Fundamentals of Marketing

      Successful E-Marketers Adjust Quickly to Fads
      Internet Generation May Redefine Brand Loyalty
      E-Marketers Need to Break through Internet Generation Defenses
      "Convergence Marketing" Advised
      Opinions Differ on How to Promote Teen E-Commerce
      Teens Expect Retailers to Synchronize Online Marketing with Bricks-and-Mortar Facilities
      Restaurants Advised to Use Internet to Connect with Young Customers
      Teens Have Definite Preferences Regarding Web Site Designs
      E-Commerce Sites for Kids and Teens Need to Meet Basic Expectations
      E-Commerce Sites Trying to Be "Cool" Do Not Work
      Rules for Designing Tweens Sites Offered

    Advertising and Promotional Strategies

      Five Rules for Marketing to the Internet Generation Offered
      Online Market Research Seen as Only One Component
      Internet Remains One of Many Marketing Tools
      Contests and Giveaways Drive Many Online Promotions
      Street Marketing Techniques Extended to the Internet
      Marketers Find It Difficult to Blend Online and Offline Strategies
      Teens Web Sites Face Shakeout
      Malls Leverage Internet to Promote Bricks-and-Mortar Shopping
      Permission Marketing Gains Ground
      Personalized Online Ads Recommended
      Marketers Enlist Schools as Promotional Partners
      Word of Mouse Helps Online Advertisers Promote Their Sites in
      Schools
      Alloy Online Enlists Support of Schools
      Multimedia Advertising Employed by iTurf
      MaMaMedia Launches TV and Print Campaign
      E-Wallet Sites Have Multifaceted Promotional Strategies
  5. The Kids Segment of the Internet Generation

    Population Size and Growth

      Young Kids Total 23.2 Million
      Diversity Increases
      Table 5-1: Number of 2- to 7-Year-Olds by Gender, Race, and Hispanic Origin, 1999
      Table 5-2: Projected Growth in Number of 2- to 7-Year-Olds by Race, and Hispanic Origin, 1999-2004
      More than 14 Million Young Kids Have a Computer at Home
      Table 5-3: Number of 2- to 7-Year-Olds with a Computer at Home:
      by Race and Hispanic Origin, 1999
      Internet Access Available to 9.3 Million Young Kids
      Table 5-4: Number of 2- to 7-Year-Olds with Internet Access at Home: by Race and Hispanic Origin, 1999
      Two out of Three Kids Will Have At-Home Internet Access in 2004
      Table 5-5: Projected Growth in the Number of Kids Ages 2-7 with Internet Access at Home, 1999-2004

    Computer and Internet Usage

      Internet Access Contributes to Fundamental Changes in Child Development
      TV Still Dominates Media Usage by Young Kids
      Table 5-6: Amount of Weekly Time 2- to 7-Year-Olds Exposed to Media: by Race and Ethnicity
      Table 5-7: Amount of Weekly Time 2- to 7-Year-Olds Exposed to Media: by Race and Ethnicity
      Table 5-8: Preferred In-Home Media of 2-to 7-Year-Olds
      But More than 25% of Young Kids Use Computers Often at Home and in School
      Babyware Prepares Infants to Join Internet Generation
      Many Two-Year Olds Use Computers
      Kids Tend to Use Computers in Presence of Parents or Others in Household
      Table 5-9: Preferred In-Home Media of 2-to 7-Year-Olds
      Kids in Higher-Income Families Watch TV Less and Use Computers More
      Table 5-10: Amount of Daily Time 2- to 7-Year-Olds Exposed to Media by Zip Code Income
      Family Structure and Education Level Impacts Computer Use
      Table 5-11: Amount of Weekly Time 2- to 7-Year-Olds Exposed to Each Medium by Family Characteristics
      Kids Most Likely to Use Computers for Games
      Table 5-12: Average Weekly Computer Use by 2- to 7-Year-Olds: by Type of Use
      Kids Who Use Computers Often Are Likely to Favor Computer Games over Web Sites
      Table 5-13: Average Weekly Computer Usage Among Children
      Who Used a Computer Yesterday: by Type of Use
      Table 5-14: Average Weekly Time Spent on Web Sites and Computer Games by Children Who Used a Computer Yesterday: by Age Group

    Marketing and Promotion Strategies for the Kids Segment of the Internet Generation

      Toy Sites Tap into Expectations of Internet Generation Kids
      Competition Is Fierce among Toy E-Tailers
      Kellogg Co. Uses Internet to Build Kids' Loyalty
      Procter & Gamble Seeks to Enhance Crest Toothpaste Brand
      through the Internet
      Quaker Oats Partners with AOL to Attract Kids to Its Cap'n Crunch
      Web Site
      Candystand Attracts Kids and Other Buyers with Games
      Fleet Financial Aims at Young Kids
      Minute Maid Features Sweepstakes on MaMaMedia
      Kmart Teams with Sesame Workshop

    Web Sites for Young Kids

      Kids Sites Try to Combine E-Commerce with Education
      Sesame Workshop Targets the Whole Family
      MaMaMedia Emphasizes Educational Values
      Alfy.com Designed for Pre-Readers
      FoxKids.com Leverages Fox TV Content
      Go Kids Center Offers Many Links
      Zeeks.com Provides Support for School Work
  6. The Tweens Segment of the Internet Generation

    Population Size and Growth

      Total Tweens Population Exceeds 23 Million
      Table 6-1: Number of 8- to 13-Year-Olds by Gender, Race, and Hispanic Origin, 1999
      Tweens Population Is Growing Slowly
      Table 6-2: Projected Growth in Number of 8- to 13-Year-Olds by Race, and Hispanic Origin, 1999-2004
      More than 16 Million Tweens Have At-Home Computer
      Table 6-3: Number of 8- to 13-Year-Olds with a Computer at Home: by Race and Hispanic Origin, 1999
      More than 10 Million Tweens Have Access to the Internet at Home
      Table 6-4: Number of 8- to 13-Year-Olds with Internet Access at Home:
      by Race and Hispanic Origin, 1999
      Population of Online Tweens Will Grow 60% by 2004
      Table 6-5: Projected Growth in the Number of Tweens Ages 8-13 with Internet Access at Home, 1999-2004

    Computer and Internet Usage

      Television Gets the Most Media Attention from Tweens
      Table 6-6: Proportion of Time Each Medium Contributes to Total Media Budget of 8- to 13-Year-Olds
      But Tweens Wish They Had a Computer
      Table 6-7: Preferred Media of 8-to 13-Year-Olds
      Tweens Actively Engaged by Computers
      Table 6-8: Attitudes of 8- to-13-Year-Olds Toward Computers and TV
      Computer Usage Is Supervised Activity
      Table 6-9: Proportion of Time 8- to 13-Year-Olds Spend with Various Media in Their Bedroom
      Games and School Work Outpace Surfing the Web
      Table 6-10: Average Weekly Computer Use of 8- to 13-Year-Olds: by Type of Use
      Active Computer Users Also Favor Video Games Over the Web
      Table 6-11: Average Computer Use Among 8- to 13-Year-Olds Who Used a Computer Yesterday: by Type of Use

    Online Consumer Behavior of Tweens

      Tweens See Web as Entertainment Medium
      Table 6-12: Children Age 8-13: Visits to Web Sites by Type of Web Site
      Table 6-13: Children Age 8-13 Who Visited a Chat Room the Previous Day: by Type of Chat Room
      Tweens More Likely to Use Web for Researching Offline Purchases than Buying Online
      Parents Object to Online Buying by Tweens

    Marketing and Promotion Strategies for the Tweens Segment of the Internet Generation

      Reebok Attracts Young Tweens to Web Site with Offline Promotions
      General Mills Uses Strategic Alliances with Web Sites
      Foster Farms Corn Dogs Teams with RocketCash
      Nintendo and Kellogg Launch Pokéman Web Site

    Web Sites for Tweens

      Headbone Targets Tweens
      FreeZone Content is Tween-Driven
      ePlay Offers "Smart Play"
      bChannel.com and gChannel.com Invite Opinions from Tween Boys
      and Girls
      AllowanceNET Helps Tweens Learn How to Manage Money
      ICanBuy Brings Buying Power to Tweens
  7. The Teens Segment of the Internet Generation

    Population Size and Growth

      Teen Population Numbers Nearly 16 Million
      Table 7-1: Number of 14- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender, Race, and Hispanic Origin, 1999
      Teen Population Is Growing Slowly but Diversifying Rapidly
      Table 7-2: Projected Growth in Number of 14- to 17-Year-Olds by Race and Hispanic Origin, 1999-2004
      Teens Most Likely to Have Computer at Home
      Minority Teens Less Likely to Have Access to At-Home Computer
      Table 7-3: Number of 14- to 17-Year-Olds with a Computer at Home:
      by Race and Hispanic Origin, 1999
      More than 8 Million Have Internet Access at Home
      Table 7-4: Number of 14- to 17-Year-Olds with Internet Access at Home: by Race and Hispanic Origin, 1999
      Nearly 80% of Teens Will Have At-Home Internet Access in 2004
      Table 7-5: Projected Growth in the Number of Teens Ages 14-17 with Internet Access at Home, 1999-2004

    Computer and Internet Usage

      Teens Access Internet at Home Most Frequently
      Computers Still Account for Small Portion of Teen Media Usage
      Table 7-6: Proportion of Time Each Medium Contributes to Total Media Budget of 14- to 18-Year-Olds
      But a Computer with Internet Access Is Preferred Medium of Teens
      Table 7-7: Preferred Media of 14-to 18-Year-Old Teens
      Teens Use TV to "Kill Time" and Computers to Learn
      Table 7-8: Attitudes of 14- to-18-Year-Old Teens Toward Benefits of Computers vs. TV
      Few Teens Have Their Own Computer
      Table 7-9: Proportion of Time 14- to 18-Year-Old Teens Spend with Various Media in Their Bedroom

    Online Consumer Behavior of Teens

      Multitasking Common
      Table 7-10: Average Weekly Computer Use of 14- to 18-Year-Olds:
      by Type of Use
      Table 7-11: Average Weekly Computer Use of 14- to 18-Year-Olds Who Used a Computer Yesterday: by Type of Use
      Online Shopping Still Has Low Priority
      Table 7-12: Teens 14- to-18: Visits to Web Sites by Type of Web Site
      Table 7-13: Teens 14-18 Who Visited a Chat Room the Previous Day:
      by Type of Chat Room
      Online Teen Buyers Still a Minority
      But a Few Teens Are Heavy Online Shoppers
      Forecasts Project Exponential Growth in Online Spending by Teens
      Most Teens Likely to Use Web for Product Research
      Internet Banner Ads Bother Teens
      Visits to E-Commerce Sites Increase

    Marketing and Promotion Strategies for the Teens Segment of the Internet Generation

      Pepsico Teams with Yahoo
      Teen Book Imprint Looks to Alloy.com
      Kodak Uses Internet to Involve Teens in Product Design
      Troublewear.com Allows Teen Buyers to Customize Apparel Purchases
  8. The College segment of the Internet generation

    Clairol Raises Profile of Herbal Essences Line

      Nike Tries Hybrid TV and Internet Advertising Strategy
      EchoBuzz Competes against Internet for Teen Subscribers

    Web Sites for Teens

      Alloy.com Highlights Community, Content, and Commerce
      iTurf Network Highly Popular
      Snowball Caters to Internet Generation
      Teen.com Attracts Teen Girls
      Teens Create Own Content

    Key Demographic Features

      More than 4.6 Million Full-Time Students at Four-Year Colleges
      Table 8-1: Projected Growth in Number of Full-Time Students through 24 Years of Age at Four-Year Colleges, 1999-2004
      Women Outnumber Men in Four-Year Colleges
      Table 8-2: Number of Full-Time Students at Four-Year Colleges Ages 15-24: by Age Group and Sex, 1997
      College Students Remain Elite Group
      Table 8-3: Total U.S. Population Ages 18-24 vs. Full-Time Students
      at Four-Year Colleges Ages 18-24
      Non-Hispanic Whites and Asian Americans Over-represented on Campuses of Four-Year Colleges
      Table 8-4: Total U.S. Population Ages 18-24 vs. All College Students
      Ages 18-24, by Race and Hispanic Origin
      Half of Full-Time Students Hold Jobs
      Table 8-5: Employment Status of Full-Time College Students
      Ages 18 to 24
      Majority of Full-Time Students Are in 10 States
      Table 8-6: States with Largest Four-Year College Student Population
      States with Largest Four-Year College Student Population
      Number of College Students Online Will Grow 12%
      Table 8-7: Projected Growth in the Number of Full-Time Students at Four-Year Colleges with Internet Access at Place of Residence,
      1999-2004

    Internet Usage

      College Students Are Web-centric
      Male Students Spend More Time Online
      E-Mail Is Most Important
      Contests and Sweepstakes Major Online Activity

    Online Consumer Behavior of College Students

      Total College Market Seen as Substantial
      Most Student Spending Is for Essential Items
      Most Students Have Credit Cards
      College Students Are Big E-Spenders
      Online Shopping Increases
      Offline Shopping Still More Important
      Offline Advertising Also Most Effective
      Word of Mouth Influences Buying Decisions More than Web Sites
      Word of Mouth Also Most Important Source of Information about E-Commerce Sites
      Bricks-and-Mortar Shopping Habits of College Students Present Obstacles to E-Marketers
      Surveys Generally Agree on Most Popular Online Purchases
      Offline College Music Sales Decline
      Students Furnish Dorm Rooms Online
      Dot-com Textbook Companies Fail to Compete with College Book Store Web Sites

    Marketing and Promotional Strategies for the College Segment of the Internet Generation

      Firms Attach Strategic Significance to College Market
      College Market Has Been Hard to Reach
      Internet Offers New Opportunities for College Marketers
      Marketers Use Offline Promotions to Build Online Traffic
      Free Online Offers Attract College Students
      Advantages of Online Promotion Cited
      Marketers Push Envelope to Create Successful Online Promotions
      Permission-Based Marketing E-Mails Work
      Opt-in Wireless Advertising Increases in College Market
      Textbook Marketers Adopt "Click-and-Mortar" Strategy
      Online Textbook Companies Use Traditional Advertising Media
      On-Campus Promotions Also Important
      Online Textbook Marketers Seek to Expand Business Base
      H&R Block Seeks to Build Long-Term Brand Loyalty
      Sprint's Web-based College Strategy Pays Off
      AT&T Wireless Promotes Services to College Students
      Sallie Mae Carries Out Comprehensive Offline Program to Promote New Web Site for College Students
      Riffage.com Profits from Spring-Break Promotions

    Web Sites for College Students

      Textbook Marketers and Membership Programs Top College Sites
      Student Advantage Successfully Migrates Online
      CollegeClub.com Gains High Ratings
      Loyalty Programs Succeed
      Student Publications Go Online
      College Broadcast Launches Web-Based Channels

    Appendix: Addresses of Selected Internet Generation Market Resources

      Market Research/Marketing Consultants
      Internet Sites
      Organizations

Download our eBook: How to Succeed Using Market Research

Learn how to effectively navigate the market research process to help guide your organization on the journey to success.

Download eBook

Share this report