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The U.S. Market for Hair Care Products


Attention: There is an updated edition available for this report.

  1. Executive Summary
    Scope and Methodology
    • Market Definition
    • Methodology

    The Products
    • Seven Main Categories.
    • Product Descriptions

    The Market
    • Hair Care Sales Push to $6.2 Billion in 2000
    • Market to Be Worth $7.5 Billion in 2005
    • Table 1-1: U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, 1996-2005 (dollars)
    • A Market Propelled by New Sense of Style, Graying Boomers, and Men's Use
    • The Illusion of a Mature Hair Care Market
    • A More Sophisticated Sense of Appearance
    • Shampoo Accounts for One-Third of Sales
    • Figure 1-1: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Hair Care Products, by Category, 2000 (percent): 7 categories, 2 segments

    The Marketers
    • About 50 Significant Marketers of Mass-Market Products
    • The Competitive Situation: A Hard Fight against Commodity Image
    • P&G and Unilever Jockey for Overall Hair Care Lead
    • Premium Image Trend May Return Market to a Commodity State
    • Figure 1-2: Leading Marketers Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, 2000 (percent): 7 marketers
    • The Majors Focus on Ethnic Hair Care Arena
    • Regimen Lines Yield Price-Points, Some Brand Loyalty
    • More Positioning on Technology
    • Hair Care Ad Spending Is Colossal, Despite Slip to $684 Million in 2000
    • Consumer Advertising Positioning: Beautiful Hair

    Distribution and Retail
    • Mass Merchandisers Take Bigger Slice of Hair Care
    • A Surprising Range of Margins

    The Consumer
    • Shampoo the Most Widely Used Hair Care Product
    • Table 1-2: Adult Users of Hair Care Products, by Product Type, 2000 (number): 7 product types
    • Gender Factor in Use of Most Hair Care Products
  2. The Products
    Introduction
    • Market Definition
    • Clarification of Terms
    • Clarification of Price-Tiers

    The Products
    • Seven Main Categories
    • Similar Products, Separate Positionings
    • Shampoos
    • Styling Products.
    • Hair Spray/Spritz.
    • Hairdressings.
    • Conditioners.
    • Hair Accessories
    • Hair Coloring
    • Home Permanent/Relaxer Kits
    • Hair Growth Products
    • Some Hybrid Products
    • Natural and Quasi-Natural Hair Care
    • Packaging: Mostly Plastic, But Metal and Glass, Too
  3. The Market
    • Figure 3-1: U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, 1996-2000

    Market Size and Growth
    • Method of Calculating Sales Figures.
    • Hair Care Sales Push to $6.2 Billion in 2000
    • A Market Propelled by New Sense of Style, Graying Boomers, and Men's Use
    • Shampoo Breaks Stride at $2 Billion Level.
    • Styling Products Meander to $1.3 Billion
    • Conditioners in Brisk Climb to $1.2 Billion
    • Accessories Build Momentum, Approach $1.0 Billion
    • Hair Color Bullish at $416 Million
    • Home Perms/Relaxers, in Slower Slide, Register $123 Million
    • Hair Growth, Also at $123 Million, Is Stunted
    • Interesting Breakouts for the Styling Products Category
    • Table 3-1: U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, by Category, 1996-2000 (dollars): 7 categories.
    • Table 3-2: U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Styling Products, by Segment, 1996-2000 (dollars): hair spray/spritz, hair dressings

    Factors in Future Growth
    • The Illusion of a Mature Hair Care Market
    • A More Sophisticated Sense of Appearance
    • .But Fashion Is Fickle
    • Graying Boomers Experiment with Their Hairstyles
    • Kids Style-Conscious at Earlier Age
    • Table 3-3: Projection of U.S. Population by Age Group, 2000-2010 (number): 6 age groups
    • Men Now Likelier to Use Hair Care Products
    • A Growing Ethnic Market
    • Table 3-4: Projection of U.S. Population by Race and by Hispanic Origin, 2000-2010 (number): African American, Hispanic origin, Asian American.
    • New Product Development Stresses Regimens and Prestige Image
    • The National Economy

    Outlook by Category
    • Shampoo
    • Styling Products.
    • Conditioners.
    • Accessories
    • Hair Coloring Products
    • Home Permanent/Relaxer Kits
    • Hair Growth Products
    • Figure 3-2: Projected U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, 1996-2000

    Projected Sales
    • Hair Care to Be Worth $7.5 Billion in 2005
    • Expect Shampoo to Push Steadily Toward $2.4 Billion
    • Styling Products in Steady Groove to $1.6 Billion
    • Conditioners to Climb Briskly to $1.5 Billion
    • Accessories Sales Predicted to Near $1.2 Billion
    • Hair Color in Strong Ascent to $552 Million
    • Home Perm/Relaxer Kits to Rally Slowly to $131 Million
    • Hair Growth to Struggle to $127 Million
    • Table 3-5: Projected U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, by Category, 2000-2005 (dollars): 7 categories
    • In Styling Products Category, Dressings to Eclipse Sprays
    • Table 3-6: Projected U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Styling Products, by Segment, 2000-2005 (dollars): hair spray/spritz, hair dressings

    Market Composition: By Product
    • Shampoo Accounts for One-Third of Sales
    • Table 3-7: Share of U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, by Category, 1996-2000 (percent): 7 categories, 2 segments
    • Dressings Gain in Share of Styling Dollars
    • Table 3-8: Share of U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Styling Products, by Segment, 1996-2000 (percent): hair spray/spritz, hair dressings

    Market Composition: By Outlet
    • Mass Merchandisers Take Bigger Slice of Hair Care
    • Table 3-9: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Sales of Hair Care Products, by Channel, 1996-2000 (percent): mass merchandisers, supermarkets, drugstores

    Market Composition: Regionality
    • Special Note Regarding Simmons Regionality Data
    • Shampoo Use Has Largest Base in South
    • Table 3-10: U.S. Adult Use of Shampoo, by Region, 2000 (number, percent, index): Northeast, Midwest, South, West
    • Styling Products: Spritz, Cream, Lotion/Liquid/Tonic Show Regional Skews.
    • Table 3-11: U.S. Adult Use of Hair Styling Products, by Region, 2000 (number, percent, index): 6 product types, 4 regions
    • Conditioner Users Have Largest Base in South.
    • Table 3-12: U.S. Adult Use of Hair Conditioners/Creme Rinses, by Region, 2000 (number, percent, index): Northeast, Midwest, South, West
    • Hair Color Users Most Numerous in South.
    • Table 3-13: U.S. Adult Use of Hair Color Products, by Region, 2000 (number, percent, index): Northeast, Midwest, South, West
    • Home Perms/Relaxers a Hit in South—Other Regions Resist
    • Table 3-14: U.S. Adult Use of Home Permanent/Relaxer Kits, by Region, 2000 (number, percent, index): Northeast, Midwest, South, West
    • Southerners the Most Receptive to Hair Growth Products
    • Table 3-15: U.S. Adult Use of Hair Growth Products, by Region, 2000 (number, percent, index): Northeast, Midwest, South, West
  4. The Marketers
    The Marketers
    • About 50 Significant Marketers
    • Many HBA Specialists
    • Involvement by Drug Companies
    • Both Public and Private Companies
    • Some Degree of Consolidation
    • Table of Brands and Involvements
    • Table 4-1: Leading Hair Care Product Marketers and Their Representative Brands, 2001

    Marketer Shares
    • P&G and Unilever Jockey for Overall Hair Care Lead
    • Table 4-2: Leading Marketers Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, by Category, 2000 (percent): 7 categories, 7 marketers
    • Procter & Gamble Rules Shampoo Category
    • Table 4-3: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Shampoo, by Brand, 1999-2000 (17 marketers; 26 brands; 29 extensions; private label)
    • Unilever Is Dressings Leader.
    • Table 4-4: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Dressings, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 18 marketers; 36 brands; 17 extensions; private label
    • Unilever Also Leads in Sprays/Spritzes
    • Table 4-5: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Spray, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 14 marketers; 26 brands; 16 extensions
    • Unilever's Command of Conditioners Challenged by P&G
    • Table 4-6: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Conditioner/Creme Rinse, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 18 marketers; 30 brands; 14 extensions; private label
    • L & N and Newell Rubbermaid/Goody on Top of Accessories Heap
    • Table 4-7: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Accessories, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 8 marketers; 11 brands; 17 extensions; private label
    • L'Oreal Outruns Bristol-Myers for Hair Color Crown
    • Table 4-8: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Color, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 4 marketers; 7 brands; 31 extensions
    • L'Oreal, with Carson Added, Now Rules Relaxers
    • Table 4-9: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Home Relaxer Kits, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 12 marketers; 18 brands; 17 extensions
    • Playtex Controls Two-Thirds of Home Perm Dollars
    • Table 4-10: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Home Permanent Kits, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 7 marketers; 7 brands; 9 extensions
    • Upjohn Retains Control of Hair Growth Products Category
    • Table 4-11: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Growth Products, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 2 marketers; 2 brands; private label

    The Competitive Situation
    • A Hard Fight Against Commodity Image
    • Upscale Niches Attracting More Players
    • Premium Image Trend May Return Market to a Commodity State.
    • Retail Trends Pressure Majors, But Help Some Minors
    • The Majors Focus on Ethnic Hair Care Arena.
    • Stakes Raised in the Natural Foods Channel

    Competitive Profile: Alberto-Culver Company
    • Net Sales of Over $2.2 Billion in 2000
    • Alberto-Culver's Two Business Segments
    • The Core Alberto-Culver and St. Ives Brand Franchises
    • Pro-Line Raises Alberto-Culver's Ethnic Profile
    • Alberto-Culver's Brands Outside of Hair Care

    Competitive Profile: Bristol-Myers Squibb Company
    • Net Sales Break $18.2 Billion in 2000
    • Clairol, Inc. Is on the Block
    • Why Sell a Blue Chip Brand?
    • Clairol Still Releasing New Products
    • Ethical Pharmaceuticals Are Most Important
    • Other Bristol-Myers Product

    Competitive Profile: L'Oreal Group
    • Sales of $11.9 Billion in 2000
    • Hair Care Included within Cosmetics Sector
    • A Global Marketer with 500 Brands
    • L'Oreal's Stance Ideal for U.S. Hair Care
    • L'Oreal Targets a Range of Age Brackets
    • .And Also Men.
    • L'Oreal Mines Ethnic Hair Care Potential.
    • Other L'Oreal Brands

    Competitive Profile: The Procter & Gamble Co.
    • Net Sales of $40 Billion in Fiscal 2000
    • P&G's Five Business Segments
    • A Packaged Goods Giant with Major Hair Care Brands
    • Premium Strategies for Pantene, Physique, Vidal Sassoon
    • Some of P&G's Other Household Names

    Competitive Profile: Revlon, Inc
    • Net Sales at $1.5 Billion
    • Revlon's Overall Marketing Strategy Hampered by Debt.
    • Revlon Banks on a New Premium Hair Care Line
    • Sale of African Pride to Colomer
    • Other Revlon Brands

    Competitive Profile: Unilever
    • Turnover Edges Up to $44 Billion in 2000
    • Unilever's Four Business Segments
    • Unilever Is Also the Other Diversified Giant
    • Unilever Champions the Low End.
    • Other Unilever Marques

    Marketing Trends
    • Marketers Install Solid Niches in Commodity Business
    • Regimen Lines Yield Price-Points, Some Brand Loyalty
    • More Positioning on Technology
    • Melding Prestige and Mass

    Product Trends
    • Regimen Lines and Collections
    • Higher-End Hair Care Products.
    • Natural and Seminatural Products
    • Milder Products
    • Table 4-12: Selected New Product Introductions, 1999-2001 (listing): 27 marketers, 39 brands

    Consumer Advertising Expenditures
    • Hair Care Ad Spending Is Colossal, Despite Slip to $684 Million in 2000
    • Seventeen $1 Million-Plus Spenders in 2000
    • P&G Leads Pack with $154 Million Expenditure
    • L'Oreal and Bristol-Myers Nearly Tied, Spending $138 Million and $135 Million
    • Unilever Cuts Buys to $79 Million
    • Alberto-Culver Doubles Spending to $51 Million
    • J & J Brakes to $49 Million
    • Upjohn Doubles Rogaine Ad Budget to $42 Million
    • Four Marketers Expended Between $4 Million and $7 Million
    • Five Others Spent More Than $1 Million
    • "All Other" Marketers Spend $3.5 Million

    Consumer Advertising Positioning
    • Beautiful Hair
    • Healthy Hair
    • Volume
    • Cutting Edge Styles for Everyone
    • Antidandruff/Anti-Itch Properties
    • African American Beauty
    • Graying Gracefully
    • Hair Color for Men: Quick, Discreet, and Macho
    • Hair Growth Tactics: Men's versus Women's Products.
    • Celebrity Endorsements.

    Consumer Promotions
    • Coupons and More Coupons
    • A Contest for Graying Men
    • Table 4-13: Share of Hair Care Retail Dollar Sales Transacted with Marketer-Issued Coupons, by Product Type, 1998 (percent): 14 product types
    • Copromotions with Charities
    • Interactivity
  5. Distribution And Retail
    Distribution
    • The Traditional versus Direct-Ship Paths
    • Opting for Distribution Services—Or Not
    • Mail Order

    At the Retail Level
    • A Surprising Range of Margins
    • Table 5-1: Retailers' Average Gross Profit Margins on Hair Care Products, by Product Type, 1999 (percent): 9 product types
    • Assortments Are Vast
    • A High Share of Purchases Made on Deal
    • Table 5-2: Share of Hair Care Supermarket Dollar Sales Transacted on Deal, by Product Type, 1999 (percent): 14 product types.
    • Regimen Shelvings: Pros and Cons
    • Frequent Buyer Clubs Aid Some Hair Care Brands
    • Advice to Mass Retailers

    At the Retail Level: By Channel
    • Overview
    • Strong Multicategory Growth at Mass Merchandisers
    • Table 5-3: Change in U.S. Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products in Mass Merchandiser Outlets, by Category and Segment, 1999-2000 (percent): 7 categories, 2 segments
    • Supermarkets Profit from Dressings and Color
    • Table 5-4: Changes in U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products in the Supermarket Channel, by Category and Segment, 1999-2000 (percent): 7 categories, 2 segments
    • Drugstores Make Stronger Stand in 2000
    • Table 5-5: Gains in U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products in the Drugstore Channel, by Category and Segment, 1999-2000 (percent): 7 categories, 2 segments
  6. The Consumer
    Data Overview
    • Explanatory Note on SMRB Data

    The Consumer: Shampoos
    • Over 179 Million Adult Shampoo Users
    • Shampoos for "Normal" Hair Are Most Popular Type
    • Interesting Gender Patterns in Use of Shampoo by Type
    • Moderate Cross-Usage of Shampoo Types
    • Table 6-1: U.S. Adult Use of Various Shampoo Types, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): 11 shampoo types
    • Heavy Shampoo Use Is Most Typical of Americans
    • Table 6-2: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Shampoo in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, moderate, heavy
    • Heavy Shampooers Account for Almost Two-Thirds of Usage
    • Figure 6-1: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Adult Shampoo Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • No Stand-Out Factors in Overall Use of Shampoo
    • But Heavy Shampoo Use Marked by Several Factors.
    • Table 6-3: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Shampoo, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors.

    The Consumer: Styling Products
    • Reminder: Styling Products Are Sprays/Spritzes and Dressings
    • Over 84 Million Hair Spray Users
    • Unscented, Super Hold Are Most Popular Hair Spray Types
    • Table 6-4: U Adult Use of Various Hair Spray/Spritz Product Types, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): four levels of hold; spritz; unscented, scented
    • Aerosols Are Most Popular Hair Spray Packaging
    • Table 6-5: US. Adult Use of Hair Spray/Spritz Packagings, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): aerosol spray, pump spray
    • Moderate Frequency Dominates Hair Spray Use
    • Table 6-6: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hair Spray in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, moderate, heavy
    • Moderate Users of Hair Spray Account for Three-Quarters of Usage
    • Figure 6-2: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Adult Hair Spray Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Older Skew for Any Hair Spray Use
    • Younger Skew for Heavy Hair Spray Use
    • Table 6-7: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hair Spray, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors.
    • Light Frequency of Spritz Use Is Dominant
    • Table 6-8: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Spritz in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, moderate, heavy
    • Moderate Users Account for Half of Spritz Usage
    • Figure 6-3: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Hairstyling Spritz Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Use of Spritz Shaped by Youth, African Americans, Southerners
    • Heavy Spritzing Practiced by African Americans, Southerners, and the Affluent
    • Table 6-9: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Spritz, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors
    • Dressings Used by 73 Million
    • Gels and Mousses Are Most Widely Used Dressings
    • Table 6-10: U.S. Adult Use of Various Types of Hair Dressing, by Gender, 2000 (nmber and percent): gel, mousse, lotion/liquid, cream, tonic
    • Moderate Frequency of Gel Use Rivaled by Light Use
    • Table 6-11: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Gel in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light moderate, heavy
    • Moderate Frequency of Gel Use Accounts for Majority of Usage
    • Figure 6-4: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Hairstyling Gel Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Use of Gel Skews Young and Affluent
    • Gender Not a Factor in Heavy Use of Gel.
    • Table 6-12: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Gel, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors
    • Mousse Use Tends to Be Light
    • Table 6-13: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Mousse in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, moderate, heavy
    • Moderate Users Account for Biggest Portion of Usage
    • Figure 6-5: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Hairstyling Mousse Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Mousse Users Present a Feminine/Family Profile
    • In Heavy Mousse Use, Midwesterners and Westerners Are Key
    • Table 6-14: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Mousse, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors
    • Light Use of Lotions/Liquids/Tonics Is Prevalent.
    • Table 6-15: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Lotion/Liquid/Tonic in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, moderate, heavy
    • Moderate Use of Lotions/Liquids/Tonics Accounts for Half of Usage
    • Figure 6-6: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Hairstyling Lotion/Liquid/Tonic Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Lotion/Liquid/Tonic Use Characterized by Youth and Low Income
    • Few Key Factors in Heavy Use of Lotions/Liquids/Tonics
    • Table 6-16: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Liquid/Lotion/Tonic, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors
    • Light Use of Styling Creams Is Most Popular
    • Table 6-17: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Cream in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, moderate, heavy
    • Moderate Users of Creams Account for Over Half of Usage
    • Figure 6-7: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Styling Cream Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Midwestern Residency Featured in Hair Cream Use
    • In Heavy Use of Creams, Men Are the Sole Sure Factor
    • Table 6-18: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Cream, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors

    The Consumer: Hair Conditioners/Creme Rinses
    • Almost 97 Million Adults Use Conditioners
    • Regular Conditioner Is Most Popular Product Type
    • Table 6-19: U.S. Adult Use of Various Hair Conditioner/Creme Rinse Types, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): 12 product types
    • Moderate Frequency of Conditioner Use Prevails.
    • Table 6-20: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hair Conditioner/Crème Rinse in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, moderate, heavy
    • Moderate Users of Conditioner Also Dominate Usage
    • Figure 6-8: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Adult Hair Conditioner/Crème Rinse Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Young Women Likely Users of Conditioners
    • Heavy Use of Conditioners: Presents Broader Age Bracket.
    • Table 6-21: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hair Conditioners/Creme Rinse, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors

    The Consumer: Hair Coloring
    • Almost 36 Million Adults Color Their Hair
    • Permanent Color Is Most Popular Product Type
    • Table 6-22: U.S. Adult Use of Various Hair Coloring Product Types, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): 6 product types
    • Heavy Use of Hair Coloring Is the Norm—Because of Women.
    • Table 6-23: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hair Coloring Products in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, heavy
    • Heavy Users of Hair Color Account for the Great Majority of Usage
    • Figure 6-9: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Adult Hair Coloring Product Usage in Last Year, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Hair Color Use Peaks among Women and the Middle-Aged
    • Heavy Hair Color Use Quite Similar to Overall Use.
    • Table 6-24: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hair Coloring Products, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors

    The Consumer: Home Permanent/Relaxer Kits
    • More than 14 Million Use Home Perms or Relaxer Kits
    • Regular Home Perms Have Largest Audience
    • Table 6-25: U.S. Adult Use of Various Home Permanent/Hair Relaxer Kits, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): 8 product types.
    • Heavy Use Barely Edges Out Light.
    • Table 6-26: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Home Permanent/ Hair Relaxer Kits in Last Year, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, heavy
    • Home Perm Heavy Users Responsible for Three-Quarters of Usage
    • Figure 6-10: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Adult Home Permanent/Hair Relaxer Kit Usage in Last Year, According to Frequency, 2000
    • All Use of Home Perms Shaped by Women, Middle-Agers, Southerners
    • Heavy Home Perm Use Also Influenced by Youth
    • Table 6-27: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Home Permanent/Hair Relaxer Kits, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors

    The Consumer: Hair Growth Products
    • Over 4.6 Million Use Preps to Foster Hair Growth
    • Use of Hair Growth Products for Six Months Is Marked by Middle Age, Professional Occupation
    • Table 6-28: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hair Growth Products for at Least Six Months, 2000 (listing): 13 factors

    Appendix I: Examples Of Consumer And Trade Advertising And Promotions
    Appendix II: Addresses Of Selected Marketers

Hair care is a hot but complex market that is presently worth over $6 billion and is projected to grow to $7 billion by 2005. Americans are more style-conscious than ever before; greying baby boomers -- of both sexes -- are trying a range of hair care products to help them look and feel younger. Generations X and Y are even more adventurous than their parents, as they condition, mousse, bleach and perm at will. A savvy marketer can make a splash, if he chooses the right stance for his products. This new Packaged Facts report offers executives in-depth analyses of the action in shampoos, conditioners, styling products, hair colorings, accessories, home permanent/relaxer kits, and hair growth products. Sales trends are examined, as well as brand shares. Also covered are the competitive strategies of Alberto-Culver, Clairol, L'Oreal, Procter & Gamble, Revlon, Unilever, and others. A wealth of Simmons demographic data are also presented and discussed.


Scope And Methodology

Market Definition

In this report, Packaged Facts examines the U.S. retail market for hair care products sold to consumers through mass-market as well as prestige retail outlets, with particular emphasis on movement through supermarket, drugstore, and mass merchandise outlets. Sales to professional hair care salons are not included here, but the very interesting marketwide trend to semiprofessional products for consumer use is indeed covered.

Seven product categories are identified. In descending order of category dollar size, the seven are shampoos, styling products, conditioners, accessories, coloring, home permanent/relaxer kits, and hair growth products.

Methodology

This report delivers extensive information, in the form of both hard numbers and of carefully reasoned analysis. The raw data were gathered from primary, secondary, and syndicated research. Primary research entailed on-site examination of hair care products as displayed and sold through retail stores; Packaged Facts has also consulted with industry executives. Secondary research has involved culling data from articles appearing in financial, marketing, and trade publications; companies’ own literature, as well as independent financial reports, have also been used. Statistics on market value, growth trends, and marketer/brand shares are based on careful scrutiny of all the available data on sales and marketplace trends. In particular, market size and share estimates are based to a large degree on syndicated data supplied by Information Resources, Inc. (IRI); yet data from a broad range of sources are factored in.

Individual marketers’ national consumer advertising expenditures are derived from Competitive Media Reporting (CMR) data, as published in the trade press. Analysis of demographic factors in the purchase of hair care products is based on syndicated survey data from Simmons Market Research Bureau, Inc.

Press Release
Hair Care Market Full of Potential – Experimentation and Acceptance Propel Growth

New York, June 14/PRNewswire –- MarketResearch.com, the premier business intelligence marketplace, announced the release of a new report, “The U.S. Hair Care Market,” published by Packaged Facts. According to the study, the hair care product market has experienced substantial growth since 1996 due to increasing experimentation with new hair treatments and styles in the United States. As wide ranges of hairstyles have become acceptable in casual workplaces and in society as a whole, the product market has felt the results. Additionally, baby boomers coloring their graying hair, ethnic groups trying a broad range of styles, and children using products at a younger age, have all propelled the hair care market. Regimen lines including shampoo, conditioner and styling products have also proven to be quite popular. Americans have increasingly begun to view hair care products as “steps” in a daily regimen to be followed for the perfect hairstyle result.

“The hair care market is often considered a mature market with little potential for expansion, but the data tells another story,” said Richard Koulbanis, VP of Publishing for MarketResearch.com. “Five of the seven major categories covered in the report have experienced substantial growth over the past five years, illustrating the effect cycles of experimentation and demographic shifts can have on even the most established industries.”

U.S. retail dollar sales of hair care products amounted to over $6.2 billion in 2000, for a 4.3% improvement over the $6.0 billion posted for 1999. During 1996-2000, the overall hair care market’s compound annual rate of growth (CAGR) was a robust 4.2%. Total growth for the same four years was 17.9%, or $942.0 million. In 2000, the 4.3%—or $259.0 million—increment was produced by shampoo, styling products, conditioners, accessories, and hair color, while the two smallest categories, home permanent/relaxer kits and hair growth products, both continued to lose ground. The overall U.S. hair care market is projected to be worth nearly $7.5 billion at retail in 2005. That record sum will result from steady growth of roughly 3% or 4% during each year of the period 2000 through 2005. The compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for the time frame will be 3.7%.

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Do you know where you stand in the hair care market maze?

In what should be a fairly stable and mature market, complex fashion and societal trends are driving the hair care product categories in seemingly divergent and erratic directions. Your guide to the industry, The U.S. Market for Hair Care Products, a new report from Packaged Facts now available through MarketResearch.com, presents a complete overview of the hair care market, containing not only the important hard data, but also placing a special emphasis on carefully reasoned analysis of current market trends. The report examines sales and growth trends, the consumer marketplace, marketer/brand shares, competitive strategies, demographic data, and more. The result is a guide that shrewd executives can use to place themselves in this diverse and complex market.

Use The U.S. Market for Hair Care Products to find out how:

  • Increasingly style-conscious Americans, young and old, are pouring money into hair care products.
  • The competitive strategies of major players stack up against each other in this complex market.
  • Graying baby boomers are creating a huge demand for the hair care products that make them feel younger.
  • New developments, such as hybrid products, are changing the hair care industry.

The report also provides detailed industry information on many categories, including:

  • Shampoos
  • Styling Products
  • Conditioners
  • Hair Accessories
  • Hair Coloring
  • Home Permanent/Relaxer Kits
  • Hair Growth

Representing over 600 hours of research, analysis and execution, The U.S. Market for Hair Care Products is compiled from both primary and secondary data such as:

  • Industry-dedicated trades
  • Company, government and industry research
  • Consultations with industry experts

MarketResearch.com gives you the tools you need to identify strategic opportunities for your company and stay ahead of the competition. With this substantial insight into your current and projected market, you have the necessary information to formulate on-target business plans, execute the right creative for advertising, and budget resources properly.

At MarketResearch.com, we provide critical information to key decision-makers in the hair care industry. Visit our site at www.MarketResearch.com today to purchase any report as a complete study, or buy discrete segments using the options below:

  • MarketLooks – concise, graphic-rich summaries of full-length market research reports available for online delivery. These PowerPoint slides provide industry high points in a presentation-ready format.
  • Buy By the Slice –a cost-effective option that enables you to select and purchase exactly what you value most.

Issues Addressed:

  • New product development
  • Demographic data
  • Market share
  • Advertising and promotion trends
  • Advertising expenditures
  • Sales by distribution channel

Companies/Sites Discussed:

  • Alberto-Culver
  • L’Oreal
  • Clairol
  • Upjohn
  • Procter & Gamble
  • Unilever
  • Revlon

Categories Covered:

  • Shampoos
  • Styling Products
    • Hair Spray
    • Styling Gel/Mousse
  • Conditioners
  • Hair Accessories
  • Hair Coloring
  • Home Permanent/Relaxer Kits
  • Hair Growth

Tables and Graphs:

  • U.S. Market by Category
  • Product Breakouts by Category
  • U.S. Sales by Category, Region
  • Projected U.S. Sales by Category
  • Product Introduction by Category
  • Share of Market by Category, Outlet
  • Select Marketers by Brand Line & Product

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