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The Gay and Lesbian Market in the U.S.: Trends and Opportunities in the LGBT Community, 6th Edition

The most profound trend affecting the gay and lesbian market may be the increasing acknowledgment by American society and legal institutions of marriage equality for gay men and lesbians. The expansion of same-sex marriage and other forms of civil unions over the past decade is triggering an increase in the visible numbers of gay and lesbian family households and consequently an expanding market for consumer goods and services of all kinds. The growing number of gay and lesbian parents means that a substantial number of gay and lesbian family households generate significant expenditures on children as well as on adult household members.

Moreover, survey research shows that gay and lesbian consumers are more optimistic than other consumers about future economic growth and their own personal financial condition. This basic sense of optimism prevailing among gay and lesbian consumers suggests that they are more willing than other consumers to spend on products and services in the wake of the most severe economic downturn in 70 years.

This completely new 6th edition of Packaged Facts Gay and Lesbian Market in the U.S.: Trends and Opportunities in the LGBT Community provides marketers with the analysis and insights they need to help them succeed in a consumer segment whose buying power is fast approaching $800 billion. The report begins with an assessment of strategic trends shaping the gay and lesbian market and identifies opportunities available to marketers interested in reaching out to gay and lesbian consumers. It continues with a detailed analysis of the social and political trends affecting the gay and lesbian market and provides a forecast of the growth of the buying power of gay and lesbian consumers through 2014. The next two chapters provide a demographic profile of the gay and lesbian population and an analysis of where gay men and lesbians live. Another chapter provides an overview of gay and lesbian consumer behavior and focuses on topics such as shopping behavior, brand loyalty and the importance of eco-friendly corporate policies on the buying decisions of gay and lesbian consumers. The report then provides a detailed look at gay and lesbian consumers in the areas of financial services, travel and pet ownership and a chapter on trends in gay media that includes an analysis of gay and lesbian usage of digital media. The report concludes with a chapter on marketing approaches to gay and lesbian consumers that includes an analysis of the impact of gay-friendly corporate policies and gay-themed advertising on the purchasing decisions of gay and lesbian consumers.


Market Insights: A Selection From The Report


Marketing to Gay and Lesbian Consumers

Providing Equal Workplace Benefits Important to Gay and Lesbian Consumer Decisions

Nearly four in ten (38%) gay and lesbian consumers say they are “extremely likely” to consider a brand that is known to provide equal workplace benefits for all of their employees, including gay and lesbian employees.  Nearly nine in ten (88%) are likely to claim that workplace policies play a role in their consideration of brands, compared to 70% of heterosexual consumers. 

Data Show Marketing Directly to Gays and Lesbians Pays Off

Nearly six in ten (58%) gay and lesbian consumers are more likely to purchase everyday household products and services from companies that market directly to gays and lesbians.  Around one in five (19%) say they are “much more likely” to do so.

Companies Pay Price for Harmful Actions

A substantial majority (70%) of gay men and lesbians report that they have switched products or service providers because they found out the company had engaged in actions that are perceived as harmful to the gay and lesbian community.  Around one in three (34%) gay and lesbian consumers had done so within the last two years.

In The News


America’s Gay 2010 Buying Power Projected at $743 Billion
New Analysis by Witeck-Combs Communications and Packaged Facts

Washington, D.C. - July 20, 2010 - The total buying power of the U.S. lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) adult population in 2010 is projected to be $743 billion, according to the recently updated analysis by Witeck-Combs Communications and Packaged Facts. 

The estimate was originally derived in a joint study by both organizations entitled, “The Gay and Lesbian Market in the U.S.: Trends and Opportunities in the LGBT Community, 6th edition.” In 2009, the gay buying power projection was estimated at $732 billion.

This 2010 projection is slightly less than earlier analyses - given that the entire U.S. economy has suffered its worst recessionary consequences (between 2008 and 2010) since the Great Depression began in 1929.

In sharing the latest analysis, Bob Witeck, CEO of Witeck-Combs Communications said, “Buying power projections are frequently a standard business measure for companies and policy decision-makers.  This offers us a reasonable snapshot of the projected annual economic activity of America’s diverse gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender population even in this faltering economy.”  Since 1993, Witeck-Combs Communications, Inc. has provided expert marketing and communications counsel to Fortune 500 companies in their strategies to reach the gay consumer market. Bob Witeck and his co-founder, Wes Combs, also are co-authors of “Business Inside Out:  Capturing Millions of Brand Loyal Gay Customers” (Kaplan 2006).

Witeck stated that “buying power is not the same as affluence or wealth.  No one should infer that same-sex households are more affluent than others - this is little more than a stereotype, considering the economic evidence available.   We have seen research from academic researchers that strongly suggests gay men may earn slightly less than their heterosexual counterparts.”

He added that, “the best available Census data on same-sex couples supports the understanding, however, that LGBT households tend to skew in major metro and suburban areas -- a characteristic generally associated with higher than average income.  And while parenting trends grow, we also see evidence through Census snapshots that same-sex couples remain less likely than their married heterosexual counterparts to have kids, and they are more likely to have both partners in the workforce, factors which yield slightly higher per capita household income, especially in the case of gay male couples.”

Nonetheless, Witeck concluded, “we also are well aware that under existing laws and norms, same-sex couples are penalized throughout the economy by discriminatory tax burdens, a hodge-podge of inadequate relationship rights and obligations, complex and costly barriers to adoption and parenting, and barriers to access to public safety net programs that are routinely available to married couples and their families.”

Based on a reasonable and broad range of population samples, the analysis benchmarks between 6% to 7% of the adult U.S. population who self-identify as gay, lesbian or bisexual, or between 15 and 16 million adults.  Unlike estimates of buying power for other populations, such as African Americans or Hispanics, the projected LGBT population is estimated only among adults over the age of 18 when they are more likely to be fully aware and able to define their sexual orientation or gender identity.  For other groups such as African-Americans, Asian-Americans and Latino/as, the population total includes all ages.

The method used for this annual economic projection is intended to roughly mirror the accepted approach taken by the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia in its calculation of the purchasing power of niche consumer segments such as Hispanics and African Americans.  This methodology uses national aggregate disposable income data that are compiled by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) of the U.S. Department of Commerce and are therefore considered the most authoritative picture of overall purchasing power in the United States.  Gay and lesbian purchasing power is calculated by allocating a proportion of aggregate disposable personal income (DPI) to the gay and lesbian consumer segment.

“Buying power, we know, signals one critical measure of the growth and size of the vital LGBT consumer market,” said Don Montuori with MarketResearch.com.  “In our analysis, we are clear to define buying power as another term for ‘disposable personal income,’ which is the total after-tax income available to an individual to spend on personal consumption, personal interest payments or savings.  According to economists, today this roughly equals 86% of income.”

"The Gay and Lesbian Market in the U.S.: Trends and Opportunities in the LGBT Community, 6th Edition" is now in its fully updated form, and is considered the most comprehensive authority on accessible, non-proprietary market research compiled by Packaged Facts and Witeck-Combs Communications, Inc and brought to market with MarketResearch.com. It provides brand-new analysis of the demographic profiles, consumer behaviors, and purchasing power of the estimated 15 to 16 million adult gay men and lesbians in the United States. Key characteristics profiled include age, income, and family structure aggregated from many of the most respected datasets available.

About Witeck-Combs Communications, Inc.
Witeck-Combs Communications, Inc. is the nation’s premier strategic marketing communications firm, specializing in reaching the gay and lesbian consumer.  With over 16 years experience in this unique market, Witeck-Combs Communications not only serves as a bridge between corporate America and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender consumers (LGBT), but also provides counsel to countless non-profit organizations that aim to educate the public on gay and lesbian issues or to better reach their LGBT membership.

In April 2003, American Demographics magazine identified Bob Witeck and Wes Combs as two of 25 experts over the last 25 years who have made significant contributions to the fields of demographics, market research, media and trendspotting for their pathbreaking work on the gay and lesbian market.  Their strategic marketing book, “Business Inside Out:  Capturing Millions of Brand Loyal Gay Customers” was published in the fall of 2006 by Kaplan Publishing.  They have appeared in worldwide media outlets including Fortune, CNBC, Daily Telegraph, CNN, Reuters, Associated Press, Ad Age, the New York Times and the Washington Post.

About Packaged Facts
Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, publishes market intelligence on a wide range of consumer market topics, including consumer goods and retailing, foods and beverages, demographics, pet products and services, and financial products. Packaged Facts also offers a full range of custom research services. 

 


Gay and Lesbian Consumers Express Optimism about Economy and Personal Finances,
Display Willingness to Use Substantial Buying Power on Increased Discretionary Spending

New York, August 2, 2010 — Gay and lesbian consumers are more optimistic than many Americans about the overall direction of the country, its future economic growth, the job market and their own personal financial condition, according to survey results published in The Gay and Lesbian Market in the U.S.: Trends and Opportunities in the LGBT Community, 6th Edition by market research publisher Packaged Facts.  Armed with this confidence and $743 billion in estimated 2010 buying power, the U.S. population of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) adults is expected to amp up discretionary spending on products and services in the wake of the recession and emerging recovery.

The report relies on a diverse range of data sets, including the respected insights that combine the expertise of Witeck-Combs Communications, Inc. and Harris Interactive. Based on conservative assumptions, Packaged Facts also estimates that the gay and lesbian population likely exceeded 15 million adults in 2009.  The gay and lesbian population is projected to increase to more than 16 million adults by 2014.  The cohort’s buying power, visibility and influence on America’s marketing landscape are also expected to increase over the next five years.

The U.S. and even global trends towards marriage equality and other forms of civil unions and legal same-sex relationships over the past decade have triggered an increase in the visible presence of gay and lesbian households and, consequently expanded the measurable market space for consumer goods and services of all kinds. This market space today just as likely will include children’s products and apparel, as an increasing number of gays and lesbians are choosing to become parents. Both trends offer expanded opportunities for marketers to include same-sex couples and LGBT family households just as they do among other cross-sections of the American consumer market.

While LGBT consumers shop for value like other households, the report also suggests that 58% of gay and lesbian consumers are more likely to purchase everyday household products and services from companies that market directly to gays and lesbians. The perceived gay-friendliness of companies that choose to support causes that benefit the LGBT community is also an important factor when deciding whether to stick with or switch from some products or services.

“A sustained, focused marketing campaign dedicated to earning trust and building brand loyalty among gay and lesbian consumers is a vital component of a successful strategy in the LGBT market,” says Don Montuori, publisher of Packaged Facts.  “We’ve seen a high response measured in the LGBT community supporting gay-themed print ads with images of gay and lesbian people and featuring tailored wording.  Likewise, investing in microsites specifically geared toward gay and lesbian consumers can generate a substantial return because many indicate that they would use or prefer to use LGBT-tailored websites as opposed to a company’s general website. Even appropriately themed advertisements that appear on blogs have greater potential to attract members of the LGBT community than other consumers as a whole.”

The Gay and Lesbian Market in the U.S., 6th Edition provides an in-depth analysis of a consumer segment whose buying power is fast approaching $800 billion. The report begins with an assessment of strategic trends shaping the gay and lesbian market and identifies opportunities available to marketers interested in reaching out to gay and lesbian consumers. It continues with a detailed analysis of the social and political trends affecting the gay and lesbian market and provides a forecast of the growth of the buying power of gay and lesbian consumers through 2014.  Additionally, the report includes the latest findings from Witeck-Combs Communications/Harris Interactive online surveys of gay and lesbian and heterosexual consumers.  It also includes the latest available Census data on same-sex couples.

About Packaged Facts - Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, publishes market intelligence on a wide range of consumer market topics, including consumer goods and retailing, foods and beverages, demographics, pet products and services, and financial products.  Packaged Facts also offers a full range of custom research services. 

About Witeck-Combs Communications, Inc. - Witeck-Combs Communications, Inc. is the nation’s premier strategic marketing communications firm, specializing in reaching the gay and lesbian consumer.  With over 16 years experience in this unique market, Witeck-Combs Communications not only serves as a bridge between corporate America and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender consumers (LGBT), but also provides counsel to countless non-profit organizations that aim to educate the public on gay and lesbian issues or to better reach their LGBT membership.

In April 2003, American Demographics magazine identified Bob Witeck and Wes Combs as two of 25 experts over the last 25 years who have made significant contributions to the fields of demographics, market research, media and trendspotting for their pathbreaking work on the gay and lesbian market.  Their strategic marketing book, “Business Inside Out:  Capturing Millions of Brand Loyal Gay Customers” was published in the fall of 2006 by Kaplan Publishing.  They have appeared in worldwide media outlets including Fortune, CNBC, Daily Telegraph, CNN, Reuters, Associated Press, Ad Age, the New York Times and the Washington Post.

 

Chapter 1 Executive Summary
Introduction
Background
Overview of Report
Scope and Methodology
Scope of the Market
Overview of Data Sources
Market Trends and Opportunities
Recognition of Relationships Central Trend in American Society and in Gay and Lesbian Market
Expansion of Same-Sex Marriage Laws Creates Multiple Marketing Opportunities
Gay and Lesbian Families Represent Major Market Segment
Gay and Lesbian Consumer Optimism Generates Opportunities for Marketers
Gay and Lesbian Consumers Require Focused Marketing Approaches
Gay and Lesbian Travelers Continue to Offer Significant Opportunities
Social and Political Trends Affecting the Gay and Lesbian Market
Gallup Finds Dramatic Shift in Men’s Views of Gay Men and Lesbians
New Surveys Continue Long-Term Trend of Increasing Acceptance
“Tipping Point” May Have Been Reached
Gains Accelerate
Vast Majority of Heterosexual Americans View Coming Out with Equanimity
Large Majority of Americans Support Allowing Openly Gay Men and Women to Serve in Military
Coverage of Marriage Equality and Other Relationship Recognition Laws Continues to Expand
Support for Gay Marriage Continues to Increase
Research Demonstrates Economic Benefits of Marriage Equality
Vast Majority of Heterosexual Adults Accepting of Gays and Lesbians on the Job
Size and Growth of the Market
Gay and Lesbian Population Exceeds 15 Million
Buying Power Used to Measure Size of Market
Post-Recession Economic Projections Analyzed
2010 Gay and Lesbian Buying Power Totals $743 Billion
Demographic Profile of the Gay & Lesbian Population
Demographic Characteristics of Gay Men and Lesbians Highlighted
Census Data on Gay and Lesbian Partnerships Offer Key Demographic Insights
Where Gay Men and Lesbians Live
Methodology Explained
California and New York Have Largest Gay and Lesbian Populations
New York Metro Area Leads in Gay and Lesbian Population
Gay Couples More Likely to Live in Large Metropolitan Areas
Gender of Same-Sex Couples Varies Widely across Regions
Smaller States Attract Lesbian Couples
Male Same-Sex Couples More Likely to Live in Central Cities
Industry Highlights
Gay Men and Lesbians Find Less Comfortable Environment at Financial Services Providers
Gay and Lesbian Consumers More Likely to Turn to the Internet for Financial Information
Gay Men and Lesbians less Likely to Own Investments
Lower Prices Cause Gay and Lesbian Consumers to Switch Auto Insurers
Online Auto Insurance Purchase More Popular
Gay and Lesbian Consumers Highly Likely to Have Health Insurance
Gay and Lesbian Consumer Base Includes Core of Dedicated Travelers
Gay and Lesbian Consumers Plan to Travel More, Spend Less
Gays and the Media
Economic Downturn and Media Revolution Hit Gay Press
Both New and Traditional Gay Media Remain Vibrant
Advertising in Gay Media Remains Healthy
Media Consolidation Continues
Gay Men and Lesbians Tied to the Internet
Blog Readership Accelerates among Gay Men and Lesbians
News Blogs Most Popular with Gay and Lesbian Readers
Social Networking Sites Important to Gay Men and Lesbians
Marketing to Gay and Lesbian Consumers
Providing Equal Workplace Benefits Important to Gay and Lesbian Consumer Decisions
Data Show Marketing Directly to Gays and Lesbians Pays Off
Companies Pay Price for Harmful Actions
Brand Loyalty Swayed by Perception of Gay-Friendliness
Gay-Themed Print Ads Deemed More Effective
LGBT Microsites Offer Effective Outreach Tool
Gay and Lesbian Consumers More Positive toward Ads on Blogs, Less Drawn to Advertising on Social Networking Sites
Wide Range of Companies Advertise to Gay and Lesbian Consumers


Chapter 2 Market Trends and Opportunities
Recognition of Relationships Central Trend in American Society and in Gay and Lesbian Market
Expansion of Same-Sex Marriage Laws Creates Multiple Marketing Opportunities
Gay and Lesbian Families Represent Major Market Segment
Gay and Lesbian Consumer Optimism Generates Opportunities for Marketers
Gay and Lesbian Consumers Require Focused Marketing Approaches
Digital Media Offer Path to Gay and Lesbian Consumers
Retailers Can Benefit from Gay and Lesbian Attitudes toward Shopping
Gay and Lesbian Consumers Relate to Green Marketing Efforts
Gay and Lesbian Travelers Continue to Offer Significant Opportunities
Aging of Gay and Lesbian Population Generates Opportunities for Financial Services Firms
Gay and Lesbian Market Research Will Benefit from Strengthened Census Procedures


Chapter 3 Social and Political Trends Affecting the Gay and Lesbian Market
Changes in Societal Attitudes
Gallup Finds Dramatic Shift in Men’s Views of Gay Men and Lesbians
New Surveys Continue Long-Term Trend of Increasing Acceptance
“Tipping Point” May Have Been Reached
Gains Accelerate
Vast Majority of Heterosexual Americans View Coming Out with Equanimity
Table 3-1: Attitudes of Heterosexuals toward Coming Out
Table 3-2: Attitudes of Heterosexuals toward Honesty about Coming Out
New Study Shows Benefits of Repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Policy
Large Majority of Americans Support Allowing Openly Gay Men and Women to Serve in Military
Expansion of Same-Sex Marriage Laws
Coverage of Marriage Equality and Other Relationship Recognition Laws Continues to Expand
Table 3-3: Summary of Status of Marriage Equality and Other Relationship Recognition Laws
Support for Gay Marriage Continues to Increase
Research Demonstrates Economic Benefits of Marriage Equality
Gays in the Workplace
Heterosexual Adults More Accepting of Gays and Lesbians on the Job
Table 3-4: Reactions of Heterosexual Co-Workers, 2008 vs. 2009
Table 3-5: Attitudes of Heterosexual Adults toward Employment and Sexual Orientation
Workplace Discrimination Declines
Figure 3-1: Percent of Gay and Lesbian Adults Experiencing Discrimination in the Workplace, 2008 vs. 2009
Figure 3-2: Percent of Gay and Lesbian Adults Never Experiencing Discrimination in the Workplace, 2008 vs. 2009
Table 3-6: Types of Discrimination Experienced by Gay and Lesbian Adults in the Workplace, 2008 vs. 2009
Openness in the Workplace Continues to Increase
Table 3-7: Openness of Gay and Lesbian Adults About Sexual Orientation with Others, 2008 vs. 2009
Poor Economy Affects Willingness of Some Gays to Be Open about Sexual Orientation
Table 3-8: Impact of the Economy on Willingness of Gay and Lesbian Adults to be Open About Sexual Orientation
Gays More Comfortable in Sharing Personal Information at Work
Table 3-9: Comfort Level in Sharing Personal Information at Work, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults, 2008 vs. 2009
Diversity in the Workplace Vital to Gays and Lesbians
Table 3-10: Importance Gay and Lesbian Adults Place on Recruiting Employees from Diverse Backgrounds, 2008 vs. 2009
Few Heterosexual Adults Know about Lack of Legal Protection for Gays on the Job
Table 3-11: Knowledge of Federal Legislation Related to Employment Discrimination, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults, 2008 vs. 2009


Chapter 4 Size and Growth of the Market
The Scope and Size of the Gay and Lesbian Market
Defining the Scope of the Market
Key Factors in Estimating the Size of the Gay and Lesbian Population
Gay and Lesbian Population Exceeds 15 Million
Table 4-1: Projected Growth of Total U.S. and Gay and Lesbian Population 18 Years Old and Over, 2009-2014
The Buying Power of Gay Men and Lesbians
Buying Power Used to Measure Size of Market
“Disposable Income” Not the Same as “Discretionary”
Post-Recession Economic Projections Analyzed
Table 4-2: Actual and Projected Annual Percentage Growth in Disposable Personal Income, 2004-2014
2010 Gay and Lesbian Buying Power Totals $743 Billion
Table 4-3: Projected Growth in Gay and Lesbian Buying Power, 2009-2014
Buying Power in Major Metro Markets
Gay and Lesbian Buying Power Highest in New York and San Francisco
Table 4-4: Gay and Lesbian Buying Power in Metropolitan Areas with Largest Gay and Lesbian Populations, 2009
Washington, D.C. and San Francisco Metro Markets Lead in Per Capita Buying Power
Table 4-5: Per Capita Gay and Lesbian Buying Power in Metropolitan Areas with Largest Gay and Lesbian Populations


Chapter 5 Demographic Profile of the Gay & Lesbian Population
Overview
Demographic Data Sources Cited
Demographic Characteristics of Gay Men and Lesbians Highlighted
Demographic Profile of Gay and Lesbian Partnerships
Census Data on Gay and Lesbian Partnerships Offer Key Demographic Insights
Census Finds Many Same-Sex Couples Report as Spouses
Significant Demographic Differences between Same-Sex Spouses and Unmarried Same-Sex Couples
Age Differences Analyzed
Table 5-1: Same-Sex vs. Other Couples by Age
Non-Hispanic Whites More Prevalent
Table 5-2: Same-Sex vs. Other Couples by Race and Hispanic Origin
Interracial Couples Less Common among Opposite-Sex Couples Reporting as Spouses
Figure 5-1: Percent of Interracial Couples, Same-Sex vs. Opposite-Sex Couples
One in Five Same-Sex Couples Has Children
Table 5-3: Same-Sex vs. Opposite-Sex Couples by Presence of Children in Household
Same-Sex Couples More Highly Educated
Table 5-4: Same-Sex vs. Opposite-Sex Couples by Educational Attainment and Employment Status
Higher Household Incomes a Hallmark of Same-Sex Couples
Figure 5-2: Same-Sex vs. Opposite-Sex Couples by Average Household Income
Table 5-5: Same-Sex vs. Opposite-Sex Couples by Household Income
Homeownership Patterns Differ
Table 5-6: Same-Sex vs. Opposite-Sex Couples by Household Tenure


Chapter 6 Where Gay Men and Lesbians Live
Gay and Lesbian Population Centers
Methodology Explained
California and New York Have Largest Gay and Lesbian Populations
Table 6-1: 20 States with Largest Gay and Lesbian Populations, 2008
Gays More Prominent in Some States, Less So in Others
Table 6-2: States Ranked by Relative Importance of Gay and Lesbian Population
New York Metro Area Leads in Gay and Lesbian Population
Table 6-3: Metropolitan Areas with Largest Gay and Lesbian Populations, 2008
Gay and Lesbian Population Most Influential in San Francisco
Table 6-4: Metropolitan Areas with Largest Gay and Lesbian Populations Ranked by Relative Importance of Gay & Lesbian Population, 2008
Residential Patterns
Gay Couples More Likely to Live in Large Metropolitan Areas
Percent of Households Living in 15 Largest Metropolitan Areas, Same-Sex vs. Other Households
Gender of Same-Sex Couples Varies Widely across Regions
Table 6-5: States with a Majority of Male Same-Sex Couples, 2008
Table 6-6: States with a Majority of Female Same-Sex Couples, 2008
Smaller States Attract Lesbian Couples
Table 6-7: Lesbian Couples as Percent of All Same-Sex Couples by Size of Total Population of State
Male Same-Sex Couples More Likely to Live in Central Cities
Figure 6-2: Percent of Male and Female Same-Sex Couples Living in Core Cities of Metropolitan Areas with Largest Gay and Lesbian Populations
Table 6-8: Percent of Households Living in Core Cities of Metropolitan Areas with Largest Gay and Lesbian Populations, All Households vs. Same-Sex Households by Gender, 2008
Suburbs Draw Lesbians
Table 6-9: Residential Patterns of Lesbian Couples in New York Metropolitan Area
Table 6-10: Residential Patterns of Lesbian Couples in San Francisco Bay Metro Area by County
Table 6-11: Residential Patterns of Lesbian Couples in Washington, D.C. Metro Area by County and City


Chapter 7 Overview of Consumer Behavior
Gay and Lesbian Consumers in the Post-Recession Economy
Gay Consumers More Confident about Post-Recession Economy
Table 7-1: Impact of Severe Economic Turndown, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults
Table 7-2: Expectations toward Economy, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults
Table 7-3: Economic Growth Predictions, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults
Table 7-4: Current Job Market Ratings, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults
Table 7-5: Job Market Predictions, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults
More Gay Men and Lesbians Think Country Is on Right Track
Figure 7-1: Percent Agreeing “Things in the Country Are Going in the Right Direction,” Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults
Figure 7-2: Percent Agreeing “Things in the Country Have Pretty Seriously Gotten Off on the Wrong Track,” Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults
Gay and Lesbian Consumers More Upbeat about Personal Finances
Figure 7-3: Percent of Gay and Heterosexual Adults Expecting Household Financial Condition to Be Worse in Next Six Months, Selected Months 2008-2010
Figure 7-4: Percent of Gay and Heterosexual Adults Expecting Household Financial Condition to Be Better in Next Six Months, Selected Months 2008-2010
Spending by Gay and Lesbian Consumers Remained Robust in Immediate Aftermath of Recession
Table 7-6: Planning to Spend on Holiday Gifts, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Table 7-7: Planning to Spend on Family, Friends and Others, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Shopping and Purchasing Behavior
Gay and Lesbian Shoppers Tend to Look for Best Shopping Experience
Table 7-8: Most Important Reasons for Holiday Shopping, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Gay and Lesbian Consumers Keep up with Trends
Table 7-9: Keeping Up with Styles and Trends, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
New Products Attract Gay and Lesbian Consumers
Table 7-10: Upgrading to New Products, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults
Brand Loyalty Strong
Table 7-11: Leisure Summer Travel, LGBT vs. Heterosexual Adults
Gay and Lesbian Consumers Shop More in Every Retail Category
Table 7-12: Holiday Shopping by Type of Store, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Going Green
Gay and Lesbian Consumers Strongly Pro-Environment
Table 7-13: Attitudes toward Environmental Issues, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults
Gays More Engaged in Pro-Environment Activities
Table 7-14: Participation in Environmental Actions, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults
More Gays View Selves as Environmentally Conscious
Table 7-15: Self Identifying as Green, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults
Environmental Issues Affect Consumer Decisions of Gay Men and Lesbians
Table 7-16: Importance of Environmental Issues on Making Decisions, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults


Chapter 8 Industry Highlights
Financial Services
Gay Men and Lesbians Find Less Comfortable Environment at Financial Services Providers
Table 8-1: Comfort with Financial Services Provider, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Gay and Lesbian Consumers More Likely to Turn to the Internet for Financial Information
Table 8-2: Sources of Financial Information, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Gay Men and Lesbians less Likely to Own Investments
Table 8-3: Ownership of Investments, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Lower Prices Cause Gay and Lesbian Consumers to Switch Auto Insurers
Table 8-4: Reasons for Switching Auto Insurance, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Online Auto Insurance Purchase More Popular
Table 8-5: Method for Purchasing Auto Insurance, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Life and Homeowner’s/Renter’s Insurance less Common among Gay and Lesbian Consumers
Table 8-6: Type of Life Insurance, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Table 8-7: Homeowner’s/Renters Insurance, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Gay and Lesbian Consumers Support Health Care Reform
Table 8-8: Support for President’s Health Care Reform Bill, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Gay and Lesbian Consumers Highly Likely to Have Health Insurance
Table 8-9: Health Insurance, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Travel
Gay and Lesbian Consumer Base Includes Core of Dedicated Travelers
Table 8-10: Impact of U.S. Economy on Travel Plans, LGBT vs. Heterosexual Consumers, May 2010
Gay and Lesbian Consumers Plan to Travel More, Spend Less
Table 8-11: Expected Number and Amount of Spending on Leisure/Business Trips during Summer by LGBT and Heterosexual Consumers, 2009 vs. 2010
Gay and Lesbian Consumers More Likely to Have Travel Plans
Figure 8-12: Average Number of Business and Leisure Trips Planned in Summer by Gay and Lesbian and Other Consumers, 2010 vs. 2009
Beaches and Cities Draw Gay and Lesbian Travelers
Table 8-13: Summer Vacation Destinations in 2010, LGBT vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Gay and Lesbian Travelers Less Concerned about Gas Prices
Table 8-14: Importance of Retail Fuel Prices, LGBT vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Convenience Stores Important When Choosing Where to Buy Gas
Table 8-15: Importance of Onsite Convenience Store When Buying Fuel, LGBT vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Ownership of Pets
Pets More Likely to Be Part of Gay and Lesbian Households
Table 8-16: Pet Ownership, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Table 8-17: Pet as Member of the Family, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Pets in Gay and Lesbian Families Get More Presents
Table 8-18: Purchasing Holiday Presents for Pets, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers


Chapter 9 Gays and the Media
Media Trends
Economic Downturn and Media Revolution Hit Gay Press
Both New and Traditional Gay Media Remain Vibrant
Advertising in Gay Media Remains Healthy
Media Consolidation Continues
Gay-Themed TV Outlets Thrive
Gay and Lesbian Representation on Television Analyzed
Use of Digital Media
Gay Men and Lesbians Tied to the Internet
Table 9-1: Online Activities in Last Month, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Table 9-2: Percent Engaging in Selected Online Activities on at least a Daily Basis (Other than Work-Related), Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Blog Readership Accelerates among Gay Men and Lesbians
Figure 9-1: Percent Reading Blogs, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
News Blogs Most Popular with Gay and Lesbian Readers
Table 9-3: Types of Blogs Read by Gay and Lesbian and Heterosexual Consumers
Table 9-4: Frequency of Visiting Blogs, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Social Networking Sites Important to Gay Men and Lesbians
Table 9-5: Membership of Social Networking Sites, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Table 9-6: Frequency of Visiting Social Networking Sites, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Gay Men and Lesbians More Likely to Be on Twitter
Figure 9-2: Percent of Gay and Lesbian and Other Adults Who Are Twitter Members


Chapter 10 Marketing to Gay and Lesbian Consumers
Receptivity to Marketing and Advertising
Providing Equal Workplace Benefits Important to Gay and Lesbian Consumer Decisions
Table 10-1: Likelihood of Considering Brands That Provide Equal Workplace Benefits, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Table 10-2: Likelihood of Considering Brands That Support Nonprofits, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Data Show Marketing Directly to Gays and Lesbians Pays Off
Table 10-3: Likelihood of Purchasing Products from Companies Marketing Directly to Gays and Lesbians, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Companies Pay Price for Harmful Actions
Table 10-4: Switching Products or Service Providers Because of Harmful Actions
Brand Loyalty Swayed by Perception of Gay-Friendliness
Table 10-5: Switching Products or Service Providers to Support LGBT Community
Table 10-6: Loyalty to LGBT Friendly Brands
Table 10-7: Purchasing Behavior of Gays and Lesbians
Gay Marketing Can Benefit Health Insurance Companies
Table 10-8: Likelihood of Choosing Health Insurance Company Due to LGBT Marketing
Gay-Themed Print Ads Deemed More Effective
Table 10-9: Factors Considered Important When Choosing Health Insurance Products, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
LGBT Microsites Offer Effective Outreach Tool
Table 10-10: Usage of Microsites in General by Gay and Lesbian Consumers
Table 10-11: Usage of LGBT Microsites by Gay and Lesbian Consumers
Table 10-12: Frequency of Usage of Microsites by Gay and Lesbian Consumers
Top Reasons for Using Microsites Listed
Table 10-13: Reasons Why Gay and Lesbian Adults Use a Microsite
Lack of Knowledge Inhibits Use of Microsites
Table 10-14: Reasons Why Gay and Lesbian Adults Do Not Use a Microsite
Gays and Lesbians More Positive toward Ads on Blogs, Less Drawn to Advertising on Social Networking Sites
Table 10-15: Attitudes toward Ads on Blogs, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Consumers
Table 10-16: Feelings toward Advertising on Social Networking Sites, Gay and Lesbian vs. Heterosexual Adults
Marketing and Advertising Trends
Wide Range of Companies Advertise to Gay and Lesbian Consumers
Table 10-17: Nominees for GLAAD Media Awards in Advertising, 2009
Subaru Continues Ties with Gay and Lesbian Community
Levi’s Ties Ads to Same-Sex Marriage Movement
Campbell Soup Places First Print Ad Representing and Targeting Gay Families
Cadillac Takes “Road to Success”


Appendix: Addresses of Selected Gay and Lesbian Market Resources

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