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Natural and Specialty Cheese Markets in the U.S. and Globally

Natural and Specialty Cheese Markets in the U.S. and Globally


(Almost) everybody loves cheese: 90% of adults surveyed by Packaged Facts say they eat it. Both adults and kids eat it at home, in restaurants, and as an on-the-go snack throughout the day. Perceptions suggest that natural cheese is healthier and more nutritious than processed cheese, which has led consumers to prefer the natural options. Consumption of natural cheese has been increasing over the last 10 years, while processed cheese has declined.

Total U.S. sales of natural and specialty cheeses were $15.7 billion in 2013. The cheese market is mature, with sales growing by a CAGR of 3% since 2009. The recession caused fluctuation in volume sales, which led to higher pricing of cheeses in some years, which in turn drove some of the market dollar growth.

Even so, key segments of the cheese market continue with their growth. Increased sales will be driven by American’s lasting love for cheese products, and the continued promotion of natural cheese being nutritious as well as good tasting, despite the high fat content. Consumers are being educated to the fact that cheese is a good source of calcium, protein, and other nutrients – which consumers take to heart due to their love of the product. With snacks representing 50% of eating occasions, natural cheese is in a position to gain a greater market share over snack products such as chips and cookies, particularly with carbs and added sugars. Producers are also addressing consumer health and diet concerns with healthier, better tasting cheeses with reduced salt and fat content, as well as cheese made from milk. The cheese products made from organic milk, milk from grass-fed cows, and milk free of artificial growth hormones have also become more trendy. Organic cheese has been a growth spot, with sales projected to increase by double digits to reach $750 million in 2018.

Due to the fat content, cheese has been seen as an indulgent experience. This in turn has led to a demand of cheese that is high-quality, full-flavored, as well as authentically made to standard and tradition. The broadening of the American palette beyond the traditional favorites, such as Cheddar and Mozzarella, is driving growth of specialty and international or regional cheeses. Aged and artisanal products with robust flavor profiles and textures continue to flourish. With this new craving of specialty cheeses mass brands are creating bolder flavors with smoky, peppery, and gourmet varieties with savory spice, nut, and even dried fruit inclusion to meet consumer’s needs.

A high amount of natural and specialty cheese sales are come from mass retail outlets such as supermarkets, natural grocery chains, mass merchandisers/supercenters, and warehouse club stores. The most successful retailers in this group have built upscale cheese departments or have upgraded their departments to feature more specialty cheeses and complementary products. The store brand natural and specialty cheese business is significant, accounting for over 40% of total sales in 2013. The cheese industry is quite fragmented in the U.S. with only a couple of very large, several mid-size and numerous small manufacturers competing in the market. Kraft is the leader, but holds only 18% share of total sales.

Many of the cheese product trends found in the retail market start in foodservice, especially in restaurants. Cheese is used abundantly in many menu items, and one of the biggest opportunities for cheese is in the growing breakfast sandwich segment. Globally, the greatest growth potential for cheese is in emerging markets where newly middle class consumers are adopting “Westernized” diets that include dairy products. Emerging market growth represents a significant opportunity for export, since many of these markets do not produce enough milk to satisfy domestic demand for dairy and cheese products.

Scope of Report and Methodology

Packaged Fact’s Natural and Specialty Cheese Markets in the U.S. and Globally includes a detailed analysis of the U.S. consumer market for natural ad specialty cheese sold to consumers through retail outlets, including “bricks and mortar” stores as well as catalogues, online stores and others. The report also outlines the key threats and trends affecting the overall market and analyzes all cheese product categories and segments of both natural and specialty cheeses. Major players and brands are discussed and their key activities and performance. Market size data are provided for 2009–2013 and projections for 2014–2018. Retail channels that sell consumer-ready natural and specialty cheese are covered as well as analysis on market size and trends, and competitive analysis. To add context and perspective, information and insight is provided for processed cheese, and non-dairy cheese products, as well as the foodservice and global cheese markets.

The information in this report was obtained from both primary and secondary research. Primary research included consultation with industry sources and on-site examinations of the retail sector. Secondary research included gathering data from relevant trade, business and government sources, as well as company promotional literature and annual reports. Our estimation of market size and company performance are based on various sources including reported revenues of product manufacturers and retailers; IRI, which tracks data in mass retail outlets; and publications and other market research sources. Our analysis of consumer trends relies on data from several sources including government reports, a national online consumer usage survey conducted in January/February 2014 by Packaged Facts, and Simmons National Consumer Surveys for Spring 2004 through Summer 2013, from Experian Marketing Services. On an ongoing basis, Experian Marketing Services conducts booklet-based surveys of a large and random sample of consumers (approximately 25,000 for each 12-month survey compilation) who in aggregate represent a statistically accurate cross-section of the U.S. population.


Market Insights: A Selection From The Report U.S. Cheese Production

Cheese producers in the U.S. range from small family farmers to global conglomerates. Some market their own cheeses while others produce to supply others exclusively. Data presented in Natural and Specialty Cheese Markets in the U.S. and Globally includes production of cheese for all markets, domestic and export, including retail, foodservice and food processing.

U.S. Production of Natural Cheese Continues to Grow

Continuing an upward trend, the total production of natural cheese in the United States exceeded 10 billion pounds in 2012. Production grew at a CAGR of 2.5% between 2008 and 2012. The USDA estimated that production rose about 2% in 2013. Producers make Italian cheeses more than any other kind, with mozzarella the largest individual variety. Italian cheese production growth has outpaced American cheese production reflecting the growth of the pizza industry, as well as the mainstreaming of Italian cuisine. Production of cheddar actually declined over the last five years, the only variety to experience a decline. Other American varieties such as Colby, Monterey, and Jack grew at a rapid rate. Production of all other cheese varieties grew at faster than average pace with growth driven by Muenster and Hispanic cheeses in particular

Press Release

Move over mozzarella. Ciao cheddar. There’s a new cheese in town. Indeed, there’s a smorgasbord of exotic cheeses finding their way into meals nationwide as food manufacturers and restaurateurs seek to satisfy consumer demand for more indulgent and healthier cheese options, according to Natural and Specialty Cheese Markets in the U.S. and Globally, a recent report by market research publisher Packaged Facts. Retail dollar sales in the $16 billion natural and specialty cheese market are forecast to grow by a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 4% during 2014-2018.

“The broadening of the American palette beyond traditional favorites, cheddar and mozzarella, is driving growth of higher priced specialty and ethnic cheeses. Consumers are generally looking for products that are more indulgent, with new tastes and experiences, or healthier, more nutritious indulgences that still taste good,” says Packaged Facts research director David Sprinkle.

On the indulgent side, flavors of some newly launched cheeses continue to be more robust, with smoky, peppery, and gourmet varieties most prevalent. On the health side, marketers have continued to promote cheese as fundamentally nutritious and good tasting, despite its high fat content. Sodium as well as fat content are challenges to growth, and marketers have been addressing consumer health and diet concerns with better tasting reduced salt and fat cheeses, and cheeses made from healthier milk. Various recent healthier, better-for-you cheese launches address other needs and desires such as low lactose/lactose free and organic ingredients.

Cheese sales have also benefitted from the snacking trend. Marketers are introducing products that cater to hectic, busy consumers looking for convenience in the form of products that are easy to use and store while also good for on-the-go consumption. These and other products also address the needs of the growing single or dual household segment that wants smaller sizes that are easier and more affordable to purchase and consume. Meanwhile, moms perhaps are the real heroes when purchasing cheese products, and they drive sales of snack-friendly forms such as string/stick cheese given to their kids.

For more information on Natural and Specialty Cheese Markets in the U.S. and Globally please visit: http://www.packagedfacts.com/redirect.asp?progid=86283&productid=8068753

About Packaged Facts – Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, publishes market intelligence on a wide range of consumer market topics, including consumer demographics and shopper insights, consumer financial products and services, consumer goods and retailing, consumer packaged goods, and pet products and services. Packaged Facts also offers a full range of custom research services.

Please visit Packaged Facts on LinkedIn for more culinary, food packaging, food retailing and foodservice insights. Follow us also on Twitter, and Google+.

Chapter 1: Executive Summary
Scope of Report
Methodology
Product Classifications
The Product
U.S. Cheese Production
U.S. Production of Natural Cheese Continues to Grow
Table 1-1: Total U.S. Production of Natural Cheese: In Weight by Variety, 2008-2012 (pounds million and percent)
The Market
Figure 1-1: U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Natural and Specialty Cheeses, 2009–2013 (in millions)
Sales by Retail Channel
Market Forecast
Figure 1-2: Natural and Specialty Cheeses: Projected U.S. Retail Dollar Sales, 2013–2018 (in millions)
Retail Overview
Private Label Store Brands
Table 1-2: Private Label Store Brands of Select Retailers, 2013 Supermarkets Continue to Add Specialty and Gourmet Offerings
Grocers Find Competitive Edge with Specialty Artisan Cheese
Partnering with Well-Known Cheese Shops
Retailers Embrace Local Producers
Where Cheese Eaters Shop for Cheese
Retailers Differ for Natural and American Processed Cheese Eaters
Foodservice Overview
U.S. Cheese Use by Application
Figure 1-3: U.S. Cheese Use by Application, 2012 (percent)
Cheese in Foodservice
Retail Packaged Foods
The Consumer
90% of American Adults Eat Cheese
An Increasing Number of Americans Eat Natural or Imported Cheese
USDA Data Further Illustrates Cheese Consumption Trends
Most Households Eat a Half Pound or More of Natural or Imported
Cheese per Week
Store Brands, Kraft and Sargento Natural Cheese Eaten Most by Consumers
60% of Adults Bought Store Brand Cheese in Last Three Months
Global Overview
Global Growth from Emerging Markets
Cheese Consumption
Cheese Imports by Country
Global Competitive Landscape
Trends
Chapter 2: Trends & Innovations
Product
Health and Nutrition
Consumers Want to Know
FDA Proposes New Nutrition Label Rules
Illustration 2-1: Current and Proposed Nutrition Facts Label
Food Industry Develops Own Nutrition Label
Illustration 2-2: Facts Up Front Label
Milk Source
Artificial Hormone Free
Illustration 2-3: Sonoma Creamery Ingredient Statement
Grassmilk Cheese
Illustration 2-4: Organic Valley Grassmilk Raw Cheddar Cheese
Illustration 2-5: Graziers Natural Raw Cheese
Raw Milk
Illustration 2-6: Raw Milk Cheese at Whole Foods
Omega3 Cheese
Illustration 2-7: Omega3 Cheese
Low/Lactose-Free Cheeses
Illustration 2-8: Cabot Cheese Package
Organic Unprocessed American Cheese Singles
Illustration 2-9: Organic Unprocessed American Cheese Singles
Reduced Fat Cheese
Wholesome Goat
Illustration 2-10: Wholesome Goat Fresh Chèvre
Illustration 2-11: Kerrygold Reduced-Fat Dubliner Cheese
Power of Protein
Illustration 2-12: Kraft P3
Sodium Reduction
Illustration 2-13: Boar’s Head Lower Sodium Initiative
Dairy-Free Cheese
Table 2-1: IRI-Tracked Sales of Daiya’s Dairy-Free Cheese Products, 2012-2013 (dollars, percent)
Illustration 2-14: Kite Hill Non-Dairy Cheese
Illustration 2-15: Dairy Tree Non-Dairy Cheese
Taste and Experiences
Heluva Good! Bold Cheeses
Illustration 2-16: Heluva Good! Bold Cheeses
Treasure Cave Hot and Fiery Blue Cheese
Illustration 2-17: Treasure Cave Flavored Blue Cheese Crumbles
Cognac BellaVitano
Illustration 2-18: BellaVitano Cheese Steeped in Remy Martin Cognac
Chai BellaVitano
Illustration 2-19: Chai BellaVitano Cheese
Melkbus Winter 125 Cheese
Illustration 2-21: Melkbus Winter 125 Cheese
Landana KALE
Illustration 2-22: Landana KALE
Emmi Roth Raclette
Illustration 2-23: New Flavors of Emmi Roth Raclette Cheese
Skellig Sweet Cheddar Cheese
Illustration 2-24: Kerrygold Skellig Sweet Cheddar Cheese
Artisanal Keeps Expanding
Illustration 2-25: Whole Foods Sign Promoting American-Made Cheese
Cheese Aimed at Snacking
Crystal Farms Nibblers
Illustration 2-26: Crystal Farms Nibblers
Kerrygold Dubliner Cracker Cut
Illustration 2-27: Kerrygold Dubliner Cracker Cut Cheese
Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese Bars
Illustration 2-28: Parmissimo Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese Bars
Moon Cheese
Illustration 2-29: Moon Cheese
Frigo Cheeseheads Premium
Illustration 2-30: Frigo Cheeseheads Premium Line
Sonoma Jack Nuggets
Illustration 2-31: Sonoma Jack Nuggets
Packaging
Stand-up Pouches
Illustration 2-32: Crystal Farms Shredded Cheese Stand-Up Pouches
Grab-And-Go Packs
Illustration 2-33: Grab-And-Go Packs
Easy-Serve Container for Feta
Illustration 2-34: Ezra’s Feta
Smaller Wedges of Specialty Cheese
Illustration 2-35: Pre-Cut Cheese Display
Marketing Trends
Cacique Food Truck Tour
Illustration 2-36: Cacique Food Truck Tour
Illustration 2-37: Tillamook Loaf Love Tour
See Where Cheese Can Take You
Illustration 2-38: See Where Cheese Can Take You Campaign
Sargento Smart Snacker
Illustration 2-39: Sargento Smart Snacker
Chapter 3: The Product
Introduction
Difference Between Natural and Specialty Cheese
Natural Cheese
Specialty Cheese
Products Outside Scope
Product Classifications
Regional Classifications
Classifications by Consistency
Classifications By Cure
Other Industry Descriptors
Products by Market
Retail
Foodservice
Food Processing
Natural Cheese Segments Defined by IRI
U.S. Cheese Production
U.S. Production of Natural Cheese Continues to Grow
Table 3-1: Total U.S. Production of Natural Cheese: In Weight by Variety, 2008-2012 (pounds million and percent)
Figure 3-1: Total U.S. Production of Natural Cheese: Share by Variety, 2012(percent)
Figure 3-2: Total U.S. Production of Natural Cheese: Share by Variety, 2008(percent)
U.S. Process Cheese Production Continues to Decline
Table 3-2: Total U.S. Production of Process Cheese Products: in Weight
by Type, 2008-2012 (pounds million and percent)
80% of U.S. Cheese Production Comes from Eight States
Figure 3-3: U.S. Production of Cheese: by States, 2012 (percent share)
Chapter 4: The Market
Figure 4-1: U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Natural and Specialty Cheeses, 2009–2013 (in millions)
Sales Growth Levels Fluctuate
Table 4-1: Retail Dollar Sales of Natural and Specialty Cheeses, 2009–2013 (in millions)
Cheese Prices Volatile
Figure 4-2: Prices of 40-Pound Cheddar Block Cheese, 2004-2014 (dollars, average per pound)
Economy’s Impact on Sales
Figure 4-3: Change in GDP and Personal Consumption Expenditures, 2005–2013 (annual percent change)
Household Formation Lags
Figure 4-4: Number of U.S. Households, 2003-2013
Sales by Retail Channel
Figure 4-5: Natural and Specialty Cheeses: Projected Share of Dollar Sales by Retail Channel, 2014 (percent)
Table 4-2: Natural and Specialty Cheeses: Dollar Sales by Retail Channel, 2013 and 2014 Projected (millions)
Product Segment Sales
Table 4-3: IRI-Tracked Sales of Natural Cheese: By Segment, 2012-2013 (dollar, unit and volume sales; millions)
Figure 4-6: Dollar Share of Natural Cheese by Segment, 2013 (percent)
Figure 4-7: Volume Share of Natural Cheese by Segment, 2013 (percent)
Organic Cheese Sales Are Booming
Table 4-4: Sales of Organic Natural Cheese, 2012-2018 (dollars million, percent)
Table 4-5a: IRI-Tracked Sales of Selected Organic Cheese, 2012-2013 (dollars in millions, percent)
Table 4-5b: IRI-Tracked Sales of Selected rBGH/rBST-Free But Not Organic
Certified Cheese, 2012-2013 (dollars in millions, percent)
Table 4-6: IRI-Tracked Sales of Processed Cheese, 2012-2013 (dollar, unit and volume sales; millions)
Market Forecast
Figure 4-8: Natural and Specialty Cheeses: Projected U.S. Retail
Dollar Sales, 2013–2018 (in millions)
Chapter 5: The Marketers
Fragmented Market with Kraft Ahead by Wide Margin
Figure 5-1: Leading Marketers of Natural and Specialty Cheese: Retail Dollar Share, 52 Weeks Ending Dec 29, 2013 (percent)
Figure 5-2: Leading Marketers of Natural and Specialty Cheese:
Retail Dollar Share, 52 Weeks Ending Dec 29, 2012 (percent)
Table 5-1: IRI-Tracked Sales of Natural Cheese Marketers, 2012-2013(millions of dollars, percent)
Marketer Sales by Product Segment
Private Label Brands 60% of Shredded Segment
Table 5-2: IRI-Tracked Sales of Natural Shredded Cheese Marketers, 2012-2013 (millions of dollars, percent)
Kraft Leads Fragmented Chunks Segment
Table 5-3: IRI-Tracked Sales of Natural Chunks Cheese Marketers, 2012-2013 (millions of dollars, percent)
Sargento Leads Slice Segment
Table 5-4: IRI-Tracked Sales of Natural Slices Cheese Marketers, 2012-2013 (millions of dollars, percent)
Saputo Leads String/Stick Segment
Table 5-5: IRI-Tracked Sales of Natural String/Stick Cheese Marketers, 2012-2013 (millions of dollars, percent)
Kraft Has 35% of Crumbled Segment
Table 5-6: IRI-Tracked Sales of Natural Crumbled Cheese Marketers, 2012-2013 (millions of dollars, percent)
Kraft and Private Label Control Grated Segment
Table 5-7: IRI-Tracked Sales of Natural Grated Cheese Marketers, 2012-2013 (millions of dollars, percent)
Lactalis Leads Ricotta Segment
Table 5-8: IRI-Tracked Sales of Natural Ricotta Cheese Marketers, 2012-2013 (millions of dollars, percent)
Kraft Grows Nearly 50% in All Other Forms Segment
Table 5-9: IRI-Tracked Sales of Natural All Other Forms Cheese Marketers, 2012-2013 (millions of dollars, percent)
Private Label Brands Largest Factor in Cube Segment
Table 5-10: IRI-Tracked Sales of Natural Cube Cheese Marketers, 2012-2013 (millions of dollars, percent)
Private Label
Table 5-11: Private Label Share of Sales by Natural Cheese Segment, 2012-2013 (percent)
Table 5-12: Private Label Store Brands of Select Retailers, 2013
Competitive Profiles
Kraft Foods Group
Table 5-13: Kraft Cheese Products
Sargento Foods
Table 5-14: Sargento Cheese Products
Saputo Cheese USA
Table 5-15: Saputo Cheese USA Cheese Products
Lactalis USA
Table 5-16:: Lactalis USA Cheese Products
Crystal Farms
Table 5-17: Crystal Farms Cheese Products
Tillamook County Creamery
Table 5-18: Tillamook County Creamery Cheese Products
Agri-Mark Inc.
Table 5-19: Agri-Mark Inc. Creamery Cheese Products
BelGioioso Cheese
Table 5-20: BelGioioso Cheese Products
Dairy Farmers of America
Table 5-21: Dairy Farmers Of America Cheese Products
Bel Brands USA
Table 5-22: Bel Brands Cheese Products
Cacique
Table 5-23 :Cacique Cheese Products
Organic Valley
Table 5-24: Organic Valley Cheese Products
Chapter 6: Retail Overview
Natural and Specialty Cheese Sold in Wide Variety of Retail Outlets
Sales by Retail Channel
Figure 6-1: Natural and Specialty Cheeses: Share of Dollar Sales by Retail Channel, 2014 Projected (percent)
Table 6-1: Natural and Specialty Cheeses: Dollar Sales by Retail Channel, 2013 and 2014 Projected (millions)
Retail Outlets
Grocery Stores/Supermarkets
Natural Supermarkets
Supercenters/Mass Merchandisers
Warehouse Club Stores
Convenience Stores (C-Stores)
Dollar Stores
Drugstores
Specialty Gourmet Shops
Farmers’ Markets/Farm Stores
Internet and Direct Sales
Private Label Store Brands
Table 6-2: Private Label Store Brands of Select Retailers, 2013
Private Label Introductions
Table 6-3: Select Private Label Natural and Specialty Introductions, 2012-2014
Aldi Is Private Label Store Brands Magazine 2014 Retailer of the Year
Illustration 6-1: Aldi Specially Selected Cheese
Supermarkets Continue to Add Specialty and Gourmet Offerings
Roundy’s Expands with Mariano’s Fresh Market
Illustration 6-2: Roundy's Mariano's Fresh Market Cheese Department
Grocers Find Competitive Edge with Specialty Artisan Cheese
Illustration 6-3: PCC Natural Markets Cheese Display
Illustration 6-4: Morton Williams New York City Store Cheese Display
Partnering with Well-Known Cheese Shops
Kroger Expands Cheese Store Concept
Illustration 6-5: Murray's Cheese Shop in a Houston Kroger Store
Illustration 6-6: Di Bruno Bros. Cheese Shop in a Giant Super Food Store
Retailers Embrace Local Producers
Wegmans Collaborates with Cornell
Taste NY
Illustration 6-7: Taste NY
Kroger Carries Local Ohio Cheesemaker
Hyperlocal Market Sources Ingredients from Less Than 90 Miles
Illustration 6-8: Local Mission Market Cheese Section
Online Local-Food Grocer Helps Cheesemakers Sell
Illustration 6-9: Good Eggs
Retailers Educating Consumers
Illustration 6-10: Murray’s Videos
Parmigiano Reggiano Academy Classes Expand to Specialty Food Stores
Illustration 6-11: Parmigiano Reggiano Academy
Illustration 6-12: Bi-Rite Market Cheesemonger
Illustration 6-13: Whole Foods ACS Certified Cheese Professional
Cheesemongers
Where Cheese Eaters Shop for Cheese
Retailers Differ for Natural and American Processed Cheese Eaters
Table 6-4: Where Natural/Imported and Processed Cheese Eaters Shopped in Last Four Weeks, 2013 (index)
String Cheese Eaters Shop Everywhere
Table 6-5: Where Natural/Imported Eaters Shopped by Form in Last Four
Weeks, 2013 (index)
Chapter 7: Foodservice Overview
Overview
U.S. Cheese Use by Application
Figure 7-1: U.S. Cheese Use by Application, 2012 (percent)
Cheese in Foodservice
Mozzarella Most Used Cheese in Foodservice
Mozzarella Tops for Restaurant Pizza but Specialty Cheese Catching On
Table 7-1: Penetration of Cheeses Used on Pizza: By Segment of All
Restaurants with Pizza, 2013 (% serving)
Sandwich Chains Use Mostly Process Cheese
Retail Packaged Foods
Frozen Pizza Leading Market for Cheese
Frozen Dinners and Entrées
Illustration 7-1: Hot Pockets
Frozen Appetizers and Snack Rolls
Breakfast Big Business
Natural and Organic Marketers
FDA Proposes New Nutrition Label Rules
Illustration 7-2: Current and Proposed Nutrition Facts Label
Food Industry Develops Own Nutrition Label
Illustration 7-3: Facts Up Front Label
The U.S. Restaurant Industry
Table 7-2: U.S. Restaurant Industry Sales, 2014 Projected (in billions)
Fast Casual Restaurants Lead Growth
Table 7-3: Leading Chain Restaurants in the U.S., 2012 (in millions)
Cheese Suppliers
Trends
Specialty Cheeses Upgrade Menu Items
Illustration 7-4: Starbucks Vegetable, Egg & Fontiago Cheese Sandwich
Illustration 7-5: Daylight Foods Specialty Cheese
Sargento Originals
Illustration 7-6: Sargento Originals
Highlighting Brand of Cheese on Menu Adds Value
Illustration 7-7: TGI Fridays’ Nacho Toppers
Artisan Pizza Chains
Illustration 7-8: Pieology Artisan Pizza Chain
Domino’s Pizza Theater
Illustration 7-9: Domino’s Pizza Theater
New Products
Illustration 7-10: Emmi Roth The Fiery Five Cheeses
Illustration 7-11: Quiznos Toasty Pastas
Illustration 7-12: Sonic Chili Cheese Pretzel Dog
Illustration 7-13: Wendy’s Ciabatta Bacon Cheeseburger With Natural Aged
Asiago Cheese
Illustration 7-14: Taco Bell Breakfast
Illustration 7-15: AuBonPain Bacon & Cheddar Scones
Illustration 7-16: Subway Flatizza
Illustration 7-17: Olive Garden Parmesan Crusted Entrees
Illustration 7-18: Papa John's Double Cheeseburger Pizza
Illustration 7-19: Pizza Hut Crazy Cheesy Crust Pizza
Emerging Restaurant Concepts
Chapter 8: The Consumer
Sources
90% of American Adults Eat Cheese
Table 8-1: Adults Who Eat Cheese, 2014 (percent)
An Increasing Number of Americans Eat Natural or Imported Cheese
Table 8-2: Households That Eat Natural or Imported Cheese Compared to American Processed Cheese, 2004-2013 (percent)
USDA Data Further Illustrates Cheese Consumption Trends
Table 8-3: U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Natural Cheese: By Variety, 2004-2012 (pounds, percent)
Table 8-4: U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Processed Cheese Products: by Variety, 2004-2012 (pounds, percent)
Demographics Vary by Natural and Processed Cheese
Adults Who Eat Natural or Imported Cheese
Adults Who Eat American Processed Cheese
Adults Who Eat Processed Spread Cheese
Table 8-5: Demographic Characteristics of Natural/Imported and Processed
Cheese Eaters, 2013 (index)
Most Households Eat a Half Pound or More of Natural or Imported
Cheese per Week
Table 8-6: Households That Eat Natural or Imported Cheese: By Amount
Eaten in Last Seven Days, 2004-2013 (percent)
Most Natural Cheese Eaters Not Concerned About Fat Content
Table 8-7: Types of Natural or Imported Cheese Eaten Most Often by Households: By Product Type, 2004-2013 (percent)
Americans Love Cheddar and Mozzarella
Table 8-8: Varieties of Natural or Imported Cheese Eaten Most Often by Households: By Variety, 2004-2013 (percent)
Demographics Vary by Variety
Cheddar
Mozzarella
Monterey Jack
Feta
Table 8-9: Demographic Characteristics of Natural and Imported Cheese Eaters: By Selected Types Eaten, 2013 (index)
Store Brands, Kraft and Sargento Natural Cheese Eaten Most by Consumers
Table 8-10: Brands of Natural or Imported Cheese Eaten Most Often by Households in the Last 7 Days, 2004-2013 (percent)
Demographics Vary by Brand
Kraft
Sargento
Store Brands
Table 8-11: Demographic Characteristics of Natural and Imported Cheese Eaters: By Selected Brands, 2013 (index)
60% of Adults Bought Store Brand Cheese in Last Three Months
Figure 8-1: Adults Who Bought Store Brand Cheese Within the Last 3 Months, 2014 (percent)
Slices and Shredded Most Purchased Forms of Store Brand Cheese
Figure 8-2: Forms of Store Brand Cheese Purchased Within the Last 3 Months, 2014 (percent)
4% of Adults Eat Organic Cheese
Table 8-12: Adults That Eat Organic Foods: By Product Type, 2010-2013 (percent)
Demographic Characteristics of Organic Versus Natural Cheese Eaters
Table 8-13: Demographic Characteristics of Organic Versus Natural Cheese Eaters, 2013 (index)
Over Half of Adults Watching Diet; Seek Less Fat, Sugar, Salt, More Fiber
Table 8-14: People Watching Diet: Reasons and Foods Eaten to Watch Diet, 2005-2013 (percent)
Consumers Want to Eat Healthier, but Also Indulge
Table 8-15: Consumer Attitudes about Food: Agree a Lot, 2004-2013 (percent)
Consumer Attitudes Measured with Simmons Segmentation System
Simmons Food Lifestyle Segmentation System
Table 8-16: How Consumers Identify with Simmons Food Lifestyle Segments, 2013 (index)
Simmons Health and Well-Being Segments
Table 8-17: How Cheese Eaters Identify with Simmons Health and
Well-Being Segments, 2013 (index)
Cheese Eaters Seek Out Fresh Foods
Figure 8-3: Characteristics of Foods Consumers Especially Seek Out and Buy, 2014 (percent)
Cheese Eaters Track All Consumers in Avoiding Specific Foods and Ingredients
Figure 8-4: Foods or Ingredients Consumers Avoid, 2014 (percent)
Cheese Fits into the American Snacking Lifestyle
Figure 8-5: Mealtime/Snacking Patterns, 2014 (percent)

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