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Sponsorship - Ireland - December 2015

Sponsorship - Ireland - December 2015

"While the overall sponsorship spend in Ireland is only around a tenth of the amount spent on conventional advertising, it is nonetheless an established, resilient and growing sector with promising prospects for the years ahead. It has weathered the difficult years of the recent economic downturn, and looks set now for a period of sustained, if unremarkable, growth.’

– Brian O’Connor, Senior Consumer Analyst

This report discusses the following key issues:

With TV-related sponsorship, ensure property/target market match
Consumers want to see the payback from sponsorship
Never mind the glamour, consumers favour local sponsorships


OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Issues covered in this report
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The market
Sponsorship spend to total almost €142 million in 2015
Figure 1: Estimated sponsorship expenditure, IoI, RoI and NI, RoI, 2010-20
Forecast
Figure 2: Index of estimated sponsorship expenditure, RoI & NI, 2010-20
Market factor
Both Irish economies are recording strong(ish) growth
Confidence among Irish consumers relatively buoyant
Recovery beginning to benefit consumers’ financial health
Spending on advertising on the increase in Ireland
Sale of broadcasting rights could impact sponsorships’ effectiveness
The consumer
Sport, movies and reality TV the most popular types of TV sponsorship
Figure 3: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of TV programmes, NI and RoI, September 2015
Sports teams or stadia sponsorships regarded to be most effective
Figure 4: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of sports events, teams and awards, NI and RoI,
September 2015
Charity-related sponsorships deemed most effective by consumers
Figure 5: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of other events and organisations, NI and RoI,
September 2015
Consumers setting the bar high for what’s required of sponsors
Figure 6: Agreement with statements relating to sponsorship and sponsors, NI and RoI, September 2015
What it means
ISSUES AND INSIGHTS
With TV-related sponsorship, ensure property/target market match
The facts
The implications
Consumers want to see the payback from sponsorship
The facts
The implications
Never mind the glamour, consumers favour local sponsorships
The facts
The implications
THE MARKET – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Economic situation on the up across Ireland
Spending on advertising on the increase in Ireland
Sale of broadcasting rights could impact sponsorships’ effectiveness
MARKET SIZE AND FORECAST
Sponsorship market in Ireland back to growth after downturn
Figure 7: Estimated sponsorship expenditure, IoI, RoI and NI, RoI, 2010-20
Stronger growth ahead for RoI market, but NI market to fare well
Figure 8: Index of estimated sponsorship expenditure, RoI & NI, 2010-20
MARKET DRIVERS
RoI economic recovery firmly underway, NI less assured
Figure 9: Economic growth, actual and projected, NI, RoI & UK, 2013-16
Consumers in RoI beginning to feel effects of economic recovery
Figure 10: Financial health of Irish consumers, RoI, October 2014-September 2015
NI consumers still in a better position overall
Figure 11: Financial health of Irish consumers, NI, October 2014-September 2015
Consumer confidence in NI at highest level since 2008
RoI consumer confidence hits 10-year high in November 2015
Overall advertising spend to €1.1 billion in Ireland in 2015
Figure 12: Total advertising expenditure, IoI, RoI and NI, 2010-15
Sale of broadcasting rights can reduce a sponsorship’s effectiveness
Social media key to activating consumer engagement
Figure 13: Social network used by consumers at least once a week, NI and RoI, March 2015
Worldwide sponsorship spend at all-time high in 2015
Figure 14: Global sponsorship spend, € billion, 2007-15
NI golfer McIlroy riding high on sponsorship earnings table
Figure 15: Individual athletes with highest endorsement/sponsorship earnings, € million, 2015
KEY SPONSORSHIP EXAMPLES
Overview
Carling new sponsor of Dave
Mountain Dew takes fans snowboarding via virtual reality
Electric Ireland to sponsor Team Ireland in Rio
BP sponsorship of Indigenous Australia sparks controversy
Fashion in an age of technology
YouTube Gaming Update facilitates sponsorship
THE CONSUMER – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Sport, movies and reality TV the most popular types of TV sponsorship
Sports teams or stadia sponsorships regarded to be most effective
Charity-related sponsorships deemed most effective by consumers
Consumers want sponsors to ‘give back’
THE CONSUMER – EFFECTIVENESS OF TV SPONSORSHIP
Sport, movies, reality TV and soap operas deemed most effective
Figure 16: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of TV programmes, NI and RoI, September 2015
Men aged 25-44 most likely to regard sports programme sponsorship as very effective
Figure 17: Consumers who rate sponsorship of sport programmes (eg premiership football) to be ‘very
effective’, by gender, age and social class, NI and RoI, September 2015
Consumers aged 16-24 most inclined to highly rate sponsorship of movies on TV
Figure 18: Consumers who rate sponsorship of movies on TV to be ‘very effective’, by gender, age and
social class, NI and RoI, September 2015
Comedies, drama and soap operas seem a good bet to younger consumers
Serious, factual programmes most likely deemed ‘not at all effective’
Figure 19: Consumers who regard various forms of sponsorship of TV programmes as ‘Not At All
Effective’, NI and RoI, September 2015
THE CONSUMER – EFFECTIVENESS OF SPORTS-RELATED SPONSORSHIP
Sponsoring sports teams or stadia deemed most effective
Figure 20: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of Sports Events, Teams and Awards, NI and RoI,
September 2015
Sports teams and tournaments most likely deemed ‘very effective’
Sponsoring an individual may be best route to reaching women
Figure 21: Agreement that sponsorship of an Individual athlete/Sports personality is ‘very effective’, NI and
RoI, September 2015
Live sports events sponsorship recognised by NI consumers aged 25-34
Figure 22: Agreement that sponsorship of a live sports event is ‘very effective’, NI and RoI, September
2015
Only minority dismiss sports-related sponsorships as ‘not at all effective’
Figure 23: Consumers who regard various forms of sports-related sponsorship to be ‘not at all effective’,
NI and RoI, September 2015
THE CONSUMER – EFFECTIVENESS OF OTHER TYPES OF SPONSORSHIP
Sponsorships of charitable events and charities deemed most effective
Figure 24: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of other events and organisations, NI and RoI,
September 2015
Sponsorship of musical events most likely be deemed ‘very effective’
Figure 25: Consumers who regard various forms of other sponsorship to be ‘very effective’, NI and RoI,
September 2015
Sponsorship of music festivals/events makes most sense to 16-24s
Figure 26: Agreement that sponsorship of music festivals or events is ‘very effective’, NI and RoI,
September 2015
Sponsorship of charity organisations has broader appeal among RoI consumers
Figure 27: Agreement that sponsorship of charity organisations (eg red cross, cancer research, Trocaire)
is ‘very effective’, NI and RoI, September 2015
Women and 16-24s most convinced by charitable events sponsorships
Figure 28: Agreement that sponsorship of charitable events (eg fundraisers, fun runs etc) is ‘very
effective’, NI and RoI, September 2015
More scepticism than enthusiasm for most sponsorships
Figure 29: Consumers who regard various forms of other sponsorship to be ‘not at all effective’, NI and
RoI, September 2015
Older consumers and ABC1s most inclined to doubt radio show sponsorship
Figure 30: Agreement that sponsorship of radio shows is ‘not at all effective’, NI and RoI, September 2015
Award ceremonies also fail to appeal to mature and ABC1 consumers
Figure 31: Agreement that sponsorship of award ceremonies is ‘not at all effective’, NI and RoI,
September 2015
Scant enthusiasm among ABC1s for sponsorships of business events
Figure 32: Agreement that sponsorship of business events is ‘not at all effective’, NI and RoI, September
2015
THE CONSUMER – ATTITUDES TOWARDS SPONSORSHIP
Consumers want sponsors to contribute and have standards
Figure 33: Agreement with statements relating to sponsorship and sponsors, NI and RoI, September 2015
Consumers aged 45+ want sponsors to give something back
Figure 34: Agreement with statement ‘sponsorships are only worthwhile if they give something back to the
sport/community’, by age and social class, NI and RoI, September 2015
Sponsorships most effective at influencing consumers when local
Figure 35: Agreement with statements relating to the impact of sponsorship on consumer behaviour, NI
and RoI, September 2015
Sponsorships with local slant have near-universal appeal
Figure 36: Agreement with statement, ‘I would be more likely to use brands that sponsor local
charities/teams/events’, by gender, age and social class, NI and RoI, October 2015
Older consumers most inclined to deny sponsorships’ influence
Figure 37: Agreement with statement, ‘I don’t pay much attention to who sponsors the programmes I
watch or teams I follow’, by gender, age and social class, NI and RoI, October 2015
Men and younger consumers most likely drawn to sponsors of favourite causes
Figure 38: Agreement with statement, ‘I would be more likely to use brands that sponsor my favourite
players/teams/events’, by gender, age and social class, NI and RoI, October 2015
General sense that sponsorship has a positive impact
Figure 39: Agreement with statements relating to the practical impact of sponsorship, NI and RoI,
September 2015
Broad recognition that sponsorships improve organisations’ resources
Figure 40: Agreement with statement, ‘sponsorships improve the quality of organisations’ resources (eg
helps fund better equipment)’, by gender, age and social class, NI and RoI, October 2015
Men and ABC1s most concerned about sponsors having undue influence
Figure 41: Agreement with statement, ‘I worry that sponsors might have too much say in the running of
teams/organisations’, by gender, age and social class, NI and RoI, October 2015
Men more convinced than women of performance-related benefits
Figure 42: Agreement with statement, ‘sponsorship improves the quality of sports teams/personal
performance’, by gender, age and social class, NI and RoI, October 2015
Consumers want high ethical standards and restrictions on sponsors
Figure 43: Agreement with statements relating to standards and restrictions on sponsorship, NI and RoI,
September 2015
Older consumers and ABC1s most inclined to want ethical standards adhered to
Figure 44: Agreement with statement, ‘sponsors should take more action when the organisations/teams
they sponsor act unethically’, by gender, age and social class, NI and RoI, October 2015
Younger consumers and C2DEFs object less to alcohol brand sponsorships
Figure 45: Agreement with statement, ‘alcohol brands should not be able to sponsor sports teams/certain
events/programmes’, by gender, age and social class, NI and RoI, October 2015
APPENDIX – DATA SOURCES, ABBREVIATIONS AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION
Consumer research
Data sources
Market size rationale
Abbreviations
APPENDIX – THE CONSUMER
NI Toluna tables
Sponsorship of TV programmes
Figure 46: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of news/current affairs programmes, by
demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 47: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of comedies/sitcoms (eg Big Bang Theory)
programmes, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 48: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of movies on TV, by demographics, NI, September
2015
Figure 49: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of drama (eg Breaking Bad, CSI) programmes, by
demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 50: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of soap operas (eg Emmerdale, Fair City), by
demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 51: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of sport (eg Premiership football) programmes, by
demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 52: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of documentaries/history programmes, by
demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 53: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of home/leisure (eg cooking shows, Location,
Location, Location) programmes, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 54: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of reality TV (The X Factor, Big Brother)
programmes, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 55: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of quiz shows (eg Countdown), by demographics,
NI, September 2015
Figure 56: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of daytime (eg Jeremy Kyle Show, Loose Women)
programmes, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Sponsorship of events, teams and awards
Figure 57: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of live sports events, by demographics, NI,
September 2015
Figure 58: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of sports teams, by demographics, NI, September
2015
Figure 59: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of stadiums/arenas/venues, by demographics, NI,
September 2015
Figure 60: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of individual athletes/sports personalities, by
demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 61: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of sports tournaments, by demographics, NI,
September 2015
Figure 62: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of sports leagues, by demographics, NI, September
2015
Figure 63: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of sports awards, by demographics, NI, September
2015
Figure 64: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of sports magazines, by demographics, NI,
September 2015
Sponsorship of other events/organisations
Figure 65: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of radio shows, by demographics, NI, September
2015
Figure 66: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of music festivals or events, by demographics, NI,
September 2015
Figure 67: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of charitable events (eg fundraisers, fun runs, etc),
by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 68: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of charity organisations (eg Red Cross, Cancer
Research, Trocaire), by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 69: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of business events, by demographics, NI,
September 2015
Figure 70: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of award ceremonies, by demographics, NI,
September 2015
Figure 71: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of non-music festivals or events, by demographics,
NI, September 2015
Figure 72: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of non-charity organisations (eg orchestra), by
demographics, NI, September 2015
Agreement with statements relating to advertising
Figure 73: Agreement with the statement ‘I don’t pay much attention to who sponsors the programmes I
watch or teams I follow’, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 74: Agreement with the statement ‘I think multiple sponsors of the same event/programme can be
confusing’, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 75: Agreement with the statement ‘Sponsorships are only worthwhile if they give something back to
the sport/community’, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 76: Agreement with the statement ‘The type of brand that sponsors my favourite teams/players
matters to me’, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 77: Agreement with the statement ‘Sponsorships improve the quality of organisations’ resources
(eg helps to fund better equipment)’, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 78: Agreement with the statement ‘Sponsorship improves the quality of sports teams/personal
performance’, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 79: Agreement with the statement ‘I’m more likely to use brands that sponsor my favourite
teams/players/events’, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 80: Agreement with the statement ‘Sponsors should take more action when the
organisations/teams they sponsor act unethically’, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 81: Agreement with the statement ‘I worry that sponsors might have too much say in the running of
teams/organisations’, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 82: Agreement with the statement ‘I would be more likely to use brands that sponsor local
charities/teams/events’, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 83: Agreement with the statement ‘Alcohol brands should not be able to sponsor sports
teams/certain events/programmes’, by demographics, NI, September 2015
Figure 84: Agreement with the statement ‘I think there should be more restrictions on the type of
brands/products (eg chocolate) that can sponsor children’s programming/events’, by demographics, NI,
September 2015
RoI Toluna tables
Sponsorship of TV programmes
Figure 85: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of news/current affairs programmes, by
demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 86: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of comedies/sitcoms (eg Big Bang Theory)
programmes, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 87: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of movies on TV, by demographics, RoI, September
2015
Figure 88: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of drama (eg Breaking Bad, CSI) programmes, by
demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 89: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of soap operas (eg Emmerdale, Fair City), by
demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 90: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of sport (eg Premiership football) programmes, by
demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 91: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of documentaries/history programmes, by
demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 92: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of home/leisure (eg cooking shows, Location,
Location, Location) programmes, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 93: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of reality TV (The X Factor, Big Brother)
programmes, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 94: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of quiz show (eg Countdown), by demographics,
RoI, September 2015
Figure 95: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of daytime (eg Jeremy Kyle Show, Loose Women)
programmes, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Sponsorship of events, teams and awards
Figure 96: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of live sports events, by demographics, RoI,
September 2015
Figure 97: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of sports teams, by demographics, RoI, September
2015
Figure 98: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of stadiums/arenas/venues, by demographics, RoI,
September 2015
Figure 99: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of individual athletes/sports personalities, by
demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 100: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of sports tournaments, by demographics, RoI,
September 2015
Figure 101: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of sports leagues, by demographics, RoI,
September 2015
Figure 102: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of sports awards, by demographics, RoI,
September 2015
Figure 103: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of sports magazines, by demographics, RoI,
September 2015
Sponsorship of other events/organisations
Figure 104: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of radio shows, by demographics, RoI, September
2015
Figure 105: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of music festivals or events, by demographics, RoI,
September 2015
Figure 106: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of charitable events (eg fundraisers, fun runs, etc),
by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 107: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of charity organisations (eg Red Cross, Cancer
Research, Trocaire), by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 108: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of business events, by demographics, RoI,
September 2015
Figure 109: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of award ceremonies, by demographics, RoI,
September 2015
Figure 110: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of non-music festivals or events, by demographics,
RoI, September 2015
Figure 111: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of non-charity organisations (eg orchestra), by
demographics, RoI, September 2015
Agreement with statements relating to advertising
Figure 112: Agreement with the statement ‘I don’t pay much attention to who sponsors the programmes I
watch or teams I follow’, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 113: Agreement with the statement ‘I think multiple sponsors of the same event/programme can be
confusing’, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 114: Agreement with the statement ‘Sponsorships are only worthwhile if they give something back
to the sport/community’, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 115: Agreement with the statement ‘The type of brand that sponsors my favourite teams/players
matters to me’, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 116: Agreement with the statement ‘Sponsorships improve the quality of organisations’ resources
(eg helps to fund better equipment)’, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 117: Agreement with the statement ‘Sponsorship improves the quality of sports teams/personal
performance’, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 118: Agreement with the statement ‘I’m more likely to use brands that sponsor my favourite
teams/players/events’, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 119: Agreement with the statement ‘Sponsors should take more action when the
organisations/teams they sponsor act unethically’, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 120: Agreement with the statement ‘I worry that sponsors might have too much say in the running
of teams/organisations’, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 121: Agreement with the statement ‘I would be more likely to use brands that sponsor local
charities/teams/events’, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 122: Agreement with the statement ‘Alcohol brands should not be able to sponsor sports
teams/certain events/programmes’, by demographics, RoI, September 2015
Figure 123: Agreement with the statement ‘I think there should be more restrictions on the type of
brands/products (eg chocolate) that can sponsor children’s programming/events’, by demographics, RoI,
September 2015
UK RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Consumer research
Sampling and weighting
Definitions
Qualitative Research
Further Analysis
Brand & Social Media Research
Trade research
Informal
Formal
Desk research
Statistical Forecasting

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