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Local Living - UK - June 2015

Local Living - UK - June 2015

"Shoppers are increasingly rooting for the home team and recognising the many social and economic benefits of buying local goods and services. Such goods and services, however, are often viewed as being overpriced, which remains a significant barrier to purchase. Local retailers and producers could benefit from partnering up with services that reward customers with discounts and loyalty points and raise general awareness about their presence. This could also include price comparisons to shatter the view that locally-made items don't offer value for money."

– Ina Mitskavets, Senior Consumer Lifestyles Analyst

This report covers the following areas:

Encouraging young people to be more involved locally
Overcoming the perception that local products are too expensive


INTRODUCTION
Definitions
Abbreviations
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Knowledge of produce origins – An important driver of local shopping
Figure 1: Proportions of overall buyers and buyers of locally-produced food and drink products, April 2015
Farmers’ markets nearly as popular as supermarkets amongst local shoppers
Figure 2: Places where people shop for locally-produced items, April 2015
Desire to support local producers and economy is strong
Figure 3: Reasons why people buy locally-produced items, April 2015
Local products not seen as value for money
Figure 4: Motivations for buying more local goods and services and participating in local activities more often, April 2015
What we think
ISSUES AND INSIGHTS
Encouraging young people to be more involved locally
The facts
The implications
Overcoming the perception that local products are too expensive
The facts
The implications
MARKET DRIVERS
Key points
The Portas Review
Figure 5: Issues related to the economy that affect UK’s small businesses, 2014
Smaller businesses are less agile
Figure 6: Proportion of businesses who introduced new or significantly improved products and services in the past 12 months, 2014
Government boost to the British high street
Declining interest in keeping up with the Joneses
Figure 7: Trends in the extent to which people agree or disagree that people in their community pull together to improve the neighbourhood, England, 2003/2013-14
Figure 8: Screenshot from Streetlife website, May 2015
…But satisfaction with local areas is on the rise
Figure 9: Trends in satisfaction with local area, England, 2008-09 to 2013-14
THE CONSUMER – FREQUENCY OF BUYING LOCAL PRODUCTS
Key points
Concerns about origins drive local food and drink shopping
Figure 10: Proportions of overall buyers and buyers of locally-produced food and drink products, April 2015
Undying interest in buying local produce
Figure 11: Frequency of buying locally-produced food and drink products, April 2015
Figure 12: Factors influencing choice when buying food and non-alcoholic drink, December 2012 and March 2013
Local buying drops in non-food/drink categories
Figure 13: Proportions of overall buyers and buyers of locally-produced non-food/drink products, April 2015
Health as a driver for local personal care products
Figure 14: Frequency of buying locally-produced non-food/drink products, April 2015
THE CONSUMER – WHERE LOCAL PRODUCTS ARE BOUGHT
Key points
Over a third of local shoppers turn to farmers’ markets in search of local produce
Figure 15: Places where people shop for locally-produced items, April 2015
Veg boxes – Niche, but steadily growing
Figure 16: Screenshot from Riverford website, May 2015
INTRODUCTION
Definitions
Abbreviations
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Knowledge of produce origins – An important driver of local shopping
Figure 1: Proportions of overall buyers and buyers of locally-produced food and drink products, April 2015
Farmers’ markets nearly as popular as supermarkets amongst local shoppers
Figure 2: Places where people shop for locally-produced items, April 2015
Desire to support local producers and economy is strong
Figure 3: Reasons why people buy locally-produced items, April 2015
Local products not seen as value for money
Figure 4: Motivations for buying more local goods and services and participating in local activities more often, April 2015
What we think
ISSUES AND INSIGHTS
Encouraging young people to be more involved locally
The facts
The implications
Overcoming the perception that local products are too expensive
The facts
The implications
MARKET DRIVERS
Key points
The Portas Review
Figure 5: Issues related to the economy that affect UK’s small businesses, 2014
Smaller businesses are less agile
Figure 6: Proportion of businesses who introduced new or significantly improved products and services in the past 12 months, 2014
Government boost to the British high street
Declining interest in keeping up with the Joneses
Figure 7: Trends in the extent to which people agree or disagree that people in their community pull together to improve the neighbourhood, England, 2003/2013-14
Figure 8: Screenshot from Streetlife website, May 2015
…But satisfaction with local areas is on the rise
Figure 9: Trends in satisfaction with local area, England, 2008-09 to 2013-14
THE CONSUMER – FREQUENCY OF BUYING LOCAL PRODUCTS
Key points
Concerns about origins drive local food and drink shopping
Figure 10: Proportions of overall buyers and buyers of locally-produced food and drink products, April 2015
Undying interest in buying local produce
Figure 11: Frequency of buying locally-produced food and drink products, April 2015
Figure 12: Factors influencing choice when buying food and non-alcoholic drink, December 2012 and March 2013
Local buying drops in non-food/drink categories
Figure 13: Proportions of overall buyers and buyers of locally-produced non-food/drink products, April 2015
Health as a driver for local personal care products
Figure 14: Frequency of buying locally-produced non-food/drink products, April 2015
THE CONSUMER – WHERE LOCAL PRODUCTS ARE BOUGHT
Key points
Over a third of local shoppers turn to farmers’ markets in search of local produce
Figure 15: Places where people shop for locally-produced items, April 2015
Veg boxes – Niche, but steadily growing
Figure 16: Screenshot from Riverford website, May 2015
Desk research
Statistical Forecasting

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