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Golf Tourism - Ireland - January 2015

Golf Tourism - Ireland - January 2015

This report looks at the following areas:

  • What is the state of play for golf in Ireland?
  • What image do Irish consumers hold of golf?
  • What can be done to help attract non-golfing consumers to the game?
  • How popular are golfing holidays with Irish consumers?
  • What impact could the hosting of high-profile golfing events have on golf tourism?
Golf has assumed greater prominence with regard to tourism over recent years, and while it is a relatively niche segment, is it one of high potential value growth, with spending by golf tourists higher than average tourist expenditure.

Ireland has a strong golfing reputation amongst Irish consumers who participate in the sport; however, such consumers would be more likely to take an overnight trip to spectate at a high-profile golf tournament than to take a holiday just to play golf. Overall, however, data collected for this report indicates that the majority of Irish consumers do not play golf, citing expense and time as key barriers to play. In order to attract more consumers to the game and benefit domestic golf tourism, the sport will have to respond to the pressures faced by modern consumers.


INTRODUCTION
Key themes in the report
Definition
Data sources
Abbreviations
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The market
Market factors
Declining golf club memberships
Less than half of Irish consumer watch golf
Ireland’s portfolio of courses and events helps to position it as key golf destination
Golf tourism in RoI benefiting from lower costs
Innovations
The consumer
RoI consumers not engaged with golf
Figure 1: How often consumers play golf, NI and RoI, October 2014
Fun is the main reason for play, while expense the key barrier
Figure 2: Reasons why consumers have played golf, NI and RoI, October 2014
Figure 3: Main reasons why consumers do not play golf, NI and RoI, October 2014
Irish golfing consumers feel that Ireland has a good reputation for golf
Figure 4: Agreement with statements regarding golf tourism, NI and RoI, October 2014
What we think
ISSUES AND INSIGHTS
What is the state of play for golf in Ireland?
The facts
The implications
What image do Irish consumers hold of golf?
The facts
The implications
What can be done to help attract non-golfing consumers to the game?
The facts
The implications
How popular are golfing holidays with Irish consumers?
The facts
The implications
What impact could the hosting of high-profile golfing events have on golf tourism?
The facts
The implications
TREND APPLICATION
FSTR HYPR
Patriot Games
The Nouveau Poor
MARKET OVERVIEW
Key points
Club membership continues to decline
Figure 5: Golf club membership in Ireland, 2004-14
Finances, time pressures and patterns of play likely driving decline
Figure 6: Average cost of household and utility bills and groceries, RoI, December 2013-November
2014
Figure 7: Average number of actual weekly hours of work in main job, full and part-time employees, UK
(including NI) and RoI, 2009-13
Decline sharpest amongst juniors
Figure 8: Golf club membership in Ireland amongst men, women and juniors, 2004-14
Irish consumers more likely to watch golf live on TV than at an event
Figure 9: Methods of watching golf over the last 12 months, NI and RoI, November 2013
Irish women and younger consumers in RoI less likely to watch golf at all
Figure 10: Consumers who do not watch golf, by gender and age, NI and RoI, November 2013
Ireland’s golf product
Figure 11: Distribution of golf courses and links courses between NI and RoI
Ireland’s portfolio of golf events
Figure 12: Notable golf events hosted/to be hosted in Ireland, 2006-19
Developing and marketing Ireland’s golf product
Weakening euro a challenge to NI tourism
Figure 13: Value of euro to Pound Sterling, 2005-15
Tourism in RoI enjoying lower tax rates
MARKET SIZE
Key points
RoI attracts more non-domestic golfing visitors
Figure 14: Non-domestic golf visitors, NI and RoI, 2010-13
Non-domestic golfing tourists more lucrative
Figure 15: Expenditure by non-domestic golf visitors, NI and RoI, 2010-13
NI reliant on RoI and UK golfers; Britain the key source market for RoI
Figure 16: Country of origin of non-domestic golf visitors to NI, 2013
Figure 17: Country of origin of non-domestic golf visitors to RoI, 2012 and 2013
RoI to benefit from improved air links to core golf source markets
Figure 18: Total number of golfers in core golf markets as identified by Fáilte Ireland, 2014
STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES
Strengths
Weaknesses
COMPANIES AND INNOVATIONS
Key points
Innovations
Golf courses interested in super-sized holes
‘Golf Bicycles’ lead to a quicker round of golf
Crowdsourcing local knowledge helps golfers improve their game
Company profiles
Tourism authorities
Fáilte Ireland
Northern Ireland Tourist Board (Tourism Northern Ireland)
Tourism Ireland
Golf authorities
Confederation of Golf in Ireland
Golfing Union of Ireland
PGA (Irish Region)
Golf tour operators and associations
Ireland Golf Tour Operator Association
Irish Tourism Group
Irish Golf Tours
JD Golf Tours
Links Golf Ireland
SWING (South West Ireland Golf Ltd)
TheGolfPA.com
Golf resorts
Adare Manor
Carton House
Castlemartyr Resort
Druids Glen Resort
K Club
Lough Erne Golf & Hotel Resort
Roe Park
Trump International Golf Links & Hotel, Ireland
THE CONSUMER – HOW ENGAGED ARE IRISH CONSUMERS WITH GOLF?
Key points
NI consumers more likely to be engaged with golf
Figure 19: How often consumers play golf, NI and RoI, October 2014
Positive signs for the future of golf in NI, with 16-24-year-olds playing frequently
Figure 20: Consumers who play golf once a month or more, by work status, NI, October 2014
Poor outlook for attracting new players to the sport
Figure 21: Agreement with the statement ‘I have never played golf and am not interested in playing in
the future’, by gender and social class, NI and RoI, October 2014
High level of churn amongst the over-45s
Figure 22: Agreement with the statement ‘I have played golf in the past – but not in the last year’, by
gender and age, NI and RoI, October 2014
Overnight golf trips more likely amongst NI consumers
Figure 23: If consumers have taken an overnight trip to play golf in Ireland or abroad in the last 12
months, NI and RoI, October 2014
THE CONSUMER – DRIVERS AND BARRIERS TO PLAYING GOLF
Key points
Fun is the main reason Irish consumers play golf
Figure 24: Reasons why consumers have played golf, NI and RoI, October 2014
Expense the key barrier to play
Figure 25: Main reasons why consumers do not play golf, NI and RoI, October 2014
Figure 26: Agreement with the statement ‘It is too expensive’ as a reason for not playing golf, by social
status, RoI, October 2014
Family and work constraints key barriers to play
Figure 27: Agreement with the statement ‘I don’t have the time’ as a reason for not playing golf, by age
of children in household, RoI, October 2014
A third of RoI men don’t play due to concern they would not be good
Figure 28: Agreement with the statement ‘I am not very good/ don’t think I would be good at playing
golf’ as a reason for not playing golf, by gender and age, RoI, October 2014
THE CONSUMER – ATTITUDES TOWARDS GOLF TOURISM
Key points
RoI golfers more likely to think Ireland has a good reputation for golf
Figure 29: Consumer attitudes towards golf tourism, NI and RoI, October 2014
Self-employed and retired consumers in NI are more likely find a holiday to just play golf
appealing
Figure 30: Agreement with the statement ‘Taking a holiday just to play golf appeals to me’, by work
status, NI, October 2014
Almost half of NI golfing consumers are more interested in taking a golf holiday abroad
Figure 31: Agreement with the statement ‘I would be more interested in taking a golf holiday abroad
than in Ireland (eg Scotland)’, by gender, NI, October 2014
Over half of golfing consumers would take an overnight trip to spectate at a high-profile
event
Figure 32: Agreement with the statement ‘I would be willing to take an overnight trip to spectate at a
high-profile golf tournament/ competition’, by work status, NI, October 2014
Over half of golfing consumers would like to visit golf resorts/ destinations featured in televised
tournaments
Figure 33: Consumers who agreed with the statement ‘Seeing golf resorts/destinations in Ireland
featured on televised golf tournaments makes me want to visit them’, by gender, NI, October 2014
APPENDIX
NI Toluna tables
Figure 34: How often consumers play golf, by demographics, NI, October 2014
Figure 35: How often consumers play golf, by demographics, NI, October 2014 (continued)
Figure 36: If consumers have taken an overnight trip to play golf in Ireland or abroad in the last 12
months, by demographics, NI, October 2014
Figure 37: The main reasons why consumers play golf, by demographics, NI, October 2014
Figure 38: The main reasons why consumers play golf, by demographics, NI, October 2014 (continued)
Figure 39: The main reasons why consumers play golf, by demographics, NI, October 2014 (continued)
Figure 40: The main reasons why consumers do not play golf, by demographics, NI, October 2014
Figure 41: The main reasons why consumers do not play golf, by demographics, NI, October 2014
(continued)
Figure 42: The main reasons why consumers do not play golf, by demographics, NI, October 2014
(continued)
Figure 43: Agreement with the statement ‘Ireland has a good reputation for golf’, by demographics, NI,
October 2014
Figure 44: Agreement with the statement ‘I would be willing to take an overnight trip to spectate at a
high-profile golf tournament/ competition’, by demographics, NI, October 2014
Figure 45: Agreement with the statement ‘All the attention on Irish golfers in the last 12 months has
made me more interested in the game’, by demographics, NI, October 2014
Figure 46: Agreement with the statement ‘A golf holiday is not suitable as a family holiday’, by
demographics, NI, October 2014
Figure 47: Agreement with the statement ‘Taking a holiday just to play golf appeals to me’, by
demographics, NI, October 2014
Figure 48: Agreement with the statement ‘I would never travel to a destination just to play golf’, by
demographics, NI, October 2014
Figure 49: Agreement with the statement ‘A golfing holiday would be more expensive than a normal
holiday’, by demographics, NI, October 2014
Figure 50: Agreement with the statement ‘Deal-of-the-day websites (eg Groupon) are good for
arranging golf trips’, by demographics, NI, October 2014
Figure 51: Agreement with the statement ‘Seeing golf resorts/destinations in Ireland featured on
televised golf tournaments makes me want to visit them’, by demographics, NI, October 2014
Figure 52: Agreement with the statement ‘I would be more interested in taking a golf holiday abroad
than in Ireland (eg Scotland)’, by demographics, NI, October 2014
RoI Toluna tables
Figure 53: How often consumers play golf, by demographics, RoI, October 2014
Figure 54: How often consumers play golf, by demographics, RoI, October 2014 (continued)
Figure 55: If consumers have taken an overnight trip to play golf in Ireland or abroad in the last 12
months, by demographics, RoI, October 2014
Figure 56: The main reasons why consumers play golf, by demographics, RoI, October 2014
Figure 57: The main reasons why consumers play golf, by demographics, RoI, October 2014
(continued)
Figure 58: The main reasons why consumers play golf, by demographics, RoI, October 2014
(continued)
Figure 59: The main reasons why consumers do not play golf, by demographics, RoI, October 2014
Figure 60: The main reasons why consumers do not play golf, by demographics, RoI, October 2014
(continued)
Figure 61: The main reasons why consumers do not play golf, by demographics, RoI, October 2014
(continued)
Figure 62: Agreement with the statement ‘Ireland has a good reputation for golf’, by demographics, RoI,
October 2014
Figure 63: Agreement with the statement ‘I would be willing to take an overnight trip to spectate at a
high-profile golf tournament/ competition’, by demographics, RoI, October 2014
Figure 64: Agreement with the statement ‘All the attention on Irish golfers in the last 12 months has
made me more interested in the game’, by demographics, RoI, October 2014
Figure 65: Agreement with the statement ‘A golf holiday is not suitable as a family holiday’, by
demographics, RoI, October 2014
Figure 66: Agreement with the statement ‘Taking a holiday just to play golf appeals to me’, by
demographics, RoI, October 2014
Figure 67: Agreement with the statement ‘I would never travel to a destination just to play golf’, by
demographics, RoI, October 2014
Figure 68: Agreement with the statement ‘A golfing holiday would be more expensive than a normal
holiday’, by demographics, RoI, October 2014
Figure 69: Agreement with the statement ‘Deal-of-the-day websites (eg Groupon) are good for
arranging golf trips’, by demographics, RoI, October 2014
Figure 70: Agreement with the statement ‘Seeing golf resorts/destinations in Ireland featured on
televised golf tournaments makes me want to visit them’, by demographics, RoI, October 2014
Figure 71: Agreement with the statement ‘I would be more interested in taking a golf holiday abroad
than in Ireland (eg Scotland)’, by demographics, RoI, October 2014
UK RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Consumer research
Sampling and weighting
Definitions
Qualitative Research
Further Analysis
Brand & Social Media Research
Trade research
Informal
Formal
Desk research
Statistical Forecasting

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