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Free-from Food Trends - US - May 2015

Free-from Food Trends - US - May 2015

"Foods bearing a free-from claim appear increasingly relevant to consumers, even as those claims begin to cite relatively obscure ingredients. These foods, in consumers’ eyes, are closely tied to health – whether their own, their family’s, or the planet’s."

This report looks at the following issues:

GMOs receive regulatory approval but consumer scorn
Cost impacts interest in free-from foods
Consumers expect controversial ingredients in snacks, frozen meals


OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Definition
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The issues
Figure 1: Purchase of free-from foods, by Hispanic origin, February 2015
Figure 2: Opinions of free-from claims, by generation, February 2015
Figure 3: Foods most likely to include potentially controversial ingredients, by age, February 2015
The opportunities
Figure 4: Importance of free-from food claims, February 2015
Figure 5: Claims consumers would like to see more, by generation, February 2015
Figure 6: Reasons for purchase of free-from foods, by Millennial parents, February 2015
What it means
KEY PLAYERS
What you need to know
GMOs finding regulatory favor but consumer backlash
Antibiotics prove not to be the cure
Allergen awareness expands beyond gluten
What’s working?
GMOs grow...and wane
Brands reformulating to remove artificial ingredients
Antibiotic use declines
What’s next?
Consumers looking for details on all major allergens
Casein-free tied to gluten-free
What you need to know
Free-from claims and clean labels resonating with consumers
Environmental impact’s role in product claims
Consumers expand their awareness of allergens
Clean labels capitalize on interest in less-processed foods
Allergen-free claims prove popular with Millennials
Figure 7: Purchase of foods/drinks with any free-from claim, for any household member, by age
Figure 8: Food launches by claim, 2010-14
Cleaner label related to healthy perception
Cost impacts interest in free-from foods
Figure 9: Opinions of free-from claims, Any agree, by generation, February 2015
Health issues compel most free-from food purchasers
Health issues may be personal or environmental
Figure 10: Importance of free-from food claims, February 2015
Figure 11: Importance of free-from food claims, any top five ranking, by age, February 2015
Allergen-free of most interest to younger consumers
Soy not the protein alternative of choice for Millennials
Figure 12: Purchase of free-from foods for any household member, by age, February 2015
Free-from equates with health
Millennial parents particularly interested in free-from claims
Figure 13: Reasons for purchase of free-from foods, by Millennial parents, February 2015
Figure 14: Reasons for purchase of free-from foods, by Millennial parents, February 2015
Emerging free-from claims
Claims with relatively few followers can have an impact
Figure 15: Claims consumers would like to see more, by presence/age of children in household, February 2015
Expectations translating into introductions
Consumer expectations appear to be impacting free-from introductions
Figure 16: Foods most likely to include potentially controversial ingredients, by gender, February 2015
Figure 17: New food products introduced in 2014 featuring free-from claims, by category
Artificial-free a selling point
Consumers equate cleaner labels with natural
Figure 18: Claims consumers would like to see more, by generation, February 2015
Figure 19: Claims consumers would like to see more, By household income, February 2015
Consumers expect controversial ingredients in snacks, frozen meals
Further regulatory approval for GMOs could dramatically change the perception of many food categories
Figure 20: Foods most likely to include potentially controversial ingredients, by age, February 2015
Sesame, casein emerging among younger consumers
Allergens beyond gluten and soy gain prominence
Figure 21: Claims consumers would like to see more, by presence/age of children in household, February 2015
Figure 22: Claims consumers would like to see more, by generation, February 2015
Consumer segmentation
Figure 23: Consumers of foods with free-from claims, February 2015
Group one: Clean consumers
Figure 24: Opinions of free-from food claims, by target groups, February 2015
Group two: Distrusting doubters
Figure 25: Opinions of free-from food claims, by target groups, February 2015
Group three: Eyes on the price
Figure 26: Opinions of free-from food claims, by target groups, February 2015
Group four: Status quo stickers
Figure 27: Opinions of free-from food claims, by target groups, February 2015
APPENDIX
Data sources and abbreviations
Data sources
Abbreviations and terms
Market
Sales of milk/cream/buttermilk with free-from/organic claims
Figure 28: Sales* of milk and creams/buttermilk with hormone free/not administered claim, by type, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and
2/22/15
Figure 29: Sales* of milk and creams/buttermilk with hormone free/not administered claim, by retail channel, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13
and 2/22/15
Figure 30: Sales* of milk and creams/buttermilk, with antibiotic free/not added claim, by type, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 31: Sales* of milk and creams/buttermilk, with antibiotic free/not added claim, by retail channel, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and
2/22/15
Figure 32: Sales* of milk and creams/buttermilk labeled lactose free, by type, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 33: Sales* of milk and creams/buttermilk labeled lactose free, by retail channel, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 34: Sales* of non-GMO project verified milk and creams/buttermilk, by type, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 35: Sales* of non-GMO project verified milk and creams/buttermilk, by retail channel, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 36: Sales* of organic dairy milk and creams/buttermilk, by type, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 37: Sales* of organic dairy milk and creams/buttermilk, by retail channel, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Sales of cheese with free-from/organic claims
Figure 38: Sales* of cheese with hormone free/not administered claim, by type, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 39: Sales* of cheese with antibiotic free/not added claim, by retail channel, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 40: Sales* of cheese with antibiotic free/not added claim, by type, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 41: Sales* of cheese with hormone free/not administered claim, by retail channel, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 42: Sales* of cheese and cheese alternatives labeled lactose free, by type, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 43: Sales* of cheese and cheese alternatives labeled lactose free, by retail channel, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 44: Sales* of non-GMO project verified cheese and cheese alternatives, by type, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 45: Sales* of non-GMO project verified cheese and cheese alternatives, by retail channel, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and
2/22/15
Figure 46: Sales* of organic** cheese, by type, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 47: Sales* of organic cheese, by retail channel, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Sales of candy with free-from/organic claims
Figure 48: Sales* of non-GMO project verified candy, by type, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 49: Sales* of non-GMO project verified candy, by type, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 50: Sales* of organic candy, by type, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
Figure 51: Sales* of organic candy, by retail channel, rolling 52-weeks ending 2/24/13 and 2/22/15
US Research Methodology
Consumer research
Social Media Research
Trade research
Statistical Forecasting

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