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Attitudes Towards Innovation in the Food Market - UK - July 2015

Attitudes Towards Innovation in the Food Market - UK - July 2015

“Sampling remains popular among would-be users as a prompt for trial. Further value can be built into free samples in the eyes of consumers through positioning them as exclusive, as many people like to be the first to try a new product.”

– Kiti Soininen, Head of UK Food, Drink and Foodservice Research

This report covers the following issues:

NPD is a necessity to retain consumer interest
Early access to products appeals to a minority
Recommendations are a key prompt to trial


INTRODUCTION
Definition
Abbreviations
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Market drivers
The ageing population poses a challenge
A rise in real disposable income should boost interest in new products
One in 10 are prompted to buy new products by social media
Brands
Figure 1: Top 10 food brands, by association with “A brand that is innovative”, January 2013-April 2015
The consumer
Shoppers are most open to new products when buying treats or gifts
Figure 2: Preference for new vs familiar products, by occasion, May 2015
The power of brands holds strong in new product purchases
Figure 3: Factors that prompt people to buy a new food product, May 2015
Price promotions/special offers prompt eight in 10 people to buy a new food
Figure 4: Marketing factors most likely to encourage the purchase of a new food product, May 2015
Half of food shoppers stick to familiar products when in a hurry
Figure 5: Attitudes towards shopping for new food products, May 2015
Most people enjoy trying new food products
Figure 6: Further attitudes towards food innovation, May 2015
What we think
ISSUES AND INSIGHTS
NPD is a necessity to retain consumer interest
The facts
The implications
Early access to products appeals to a minority
The facts
The implications
Recommendations are a key prompt to trial
The facts
The implications
MARKET DRIVERS
Key points
The ageing population presents a challenge
Figure 7: Trends in the age structure of the UK population, 2010-15 and 2015-20
A rise in real disposable income should boost interest in new products
Figure 8: Financial wellbeing index, April 2009-April 2015
One in 10 are prompted to buy new products by social media
16-34s are the most active users of social networks…
…as are women
BRAND RESEARCH
Methodology
Top 10 innovative food brands
Figure 9: Top 10 food brands, by association with “A brand that is innovative”, January 2013-April 2015
Different markets represented in the top 10
Format and flavour extensions promote innovative image
Other brands create innovative image by filling a specific niche
Pioneers in certain categories enjoy a strong innovative image
Which consumers drive an innovative image?
Figure 10: Agreement with “A brand that is innovative” of top brands, by age, January 2013-April 2015
Figure 11: Agreement with “A brand that is innovative” of top brands, by socio-economic group and
household income, January 2013-April 2015
Figure 12: Agreement with “A brand that is innovative” of top brands, by gender, January 2013-April 2015
The impact of advertising
Figure 13: Share of recorded above-the-line, online display and direct mail advertising spending that each
brand has in its category, 1 January 2010-20 April 2015
What impact does being innovative have on how food brands are viewed?
Figure 14: Comparison of most innovative brands against the mean scores of all food brands, by brand
attributes, January 2013-April 2015
Usage and awareness
Differentiation
Trust
Figure 15: Comparison of most innovative brands against the mean scores of all food brands, by further
brand attributes, January 2013-April 2015
Fun and vibrancy
Satisfaction
Figure 16: Positive satisfaction of selected brands in the top 10 innovative brands against their category
competitors, January 2013-April 2015
How does the food market compare with other categories?
Figure 17: Top 10 brands associated with “A brand that is innovative” across selected categories, January
2013-April 2015
Other markets have brands that continue to disrupt markets and change lifestyles
Food brands are bound by different expectations to other markets
This limitation creates opportunities
THE CONSUMER – PREFERENCE FOR NEW VS FAMILIAR PRODUCTS
Key points
Shoppers are most open to new products when buying treats or gifts
Figure 18: Preference for new vs familiar products, by occasion, May 2015
Gifting prompts shoppers to look for new products
Most shoppers lean towards the tried and tested for expensive food
THE CONSUMER – FACTORS THAT PROMPT PURCHASES OF NEW FOOD PRODUCTS
Key points
The power of brands holds strong in new product purchases
Figure 19: Factors that prompt people to buy a new food product, May 2015
Trust facilitates brand expansion
Untapped interest in small/trial-size packs of new food products
Limited edition flavour launches attract the youth market the most
Price promotions/special offers prompt eight in 10 people to buy a new food
Figure 20: Marketing factors most likely to encourage the purchase of a new food product, May 2015
Friends and family are relied upon for product recommendations
THE CONSUMER – ATTITUDES TOWARDS SHOPPING FOR NEW PRODUCTS
Key points
Half of food shoppers stick to familiar products when in a hurry
Figure 21: Attitudes towards shopping for new food products, May 2015
Rising disposable incomes should see more openness to new products
Food buyers like to know what to expect from a new product
A pool of early adopters seeking new products
THE CONSUMER – ATTITUDES TOWARDS FOOD INNOVATION
Key points
Most people enjoy trying new food products
Figure 22: Further attitudes towards food innovation, May 2015
Two in five adults trust new branded products to be better quality than own-brand
Half of adults like to recommend new food products to others
Younger cohorts look for dialogue on NPD
THE CONSUMER – TARGET GROUPS
Key points
Three target groups
Figure 23: Target groups, May 2015
Disengaged – 22%
Variety Lovers – 31%
Immersed – 48%
UK RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Consumer research
Sampling and weighting
Definitions
Qualitative Research
Further Analysis
Brand & Social Media Research
Trade research
Informal
Formal
Desk research
Statistical Forecasting

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