The U.S. Youth Market: How 15- to 24-Year-Old Consumers are Transforming the Marketplace, 2nd Edition (Detailed Contents)

The U.S. Youth Market: How 15- to 24-Year-Old Consumers are Transforming the Marketplace, 2nd Edition


August 1, 2005
284 Pages - SKU: LA1091627
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The U.S. Youth Market How 15 to 24 Year-Old Consumers are Transforming the Marketplace 2nd Edition
  • Chapter 1 Executive Summary (pp. 31-67) US $500.00
  • Chapter 2 Demographic Profile (pp. 67-75) US $139.00
  • Chapter 3 Work School and Money (pp. 75-91) US $296.00
  • Chapter 4 Family, Friends, and Roommates (pp. 91-105) US $231.00
  • Chapter 5 Consumer Expenditure Patterns (pp. 105-115) US $242.00
  • Chapter 6 Highlights of Consumer Behavior (pp. 115-145) US $619.00
  • Chapter 7 Impact of Technology and the Internet on (pp. 145-163) US $578.00
  • Chapter 8 Media Usage and Entertainment Choices (pp. 163-193) US $747.00
  • Chapter 9 The College Segment (pp. 193-217) US $469.00
  • Chapter 10 The Multicultural Urban Youth Segment (pp. 217-245) US $548.00
  • Chapter 11 Size and Growth of the Market (pp. 245-259) US $304.00
  • Chapter 12 Marketing and Advertising Trends (pp. 259-275) US $379.00
  • Chapter 13 Trends and Opportunities (pp. 275-284) US $174.00

Below is the list of sections extracted directly from the report. Please note this list has been standardized and may not match the Table of Contents.

  • Executive Summary
    • Introduction
      • Background
      • Overview of Report
    • Scope of Report
      • Youth Market Defined
      • Methodology
    • Demographic Overview
      • Youth Population Totals 41 Million
      • Youth Population Will Register Below-Average Growth
      • Nearly 40% of Youth Are Members of Multicultural Population Segments
      • Multicultural Trend to Continue
    • Work, School, and Money
      • Aggregate Income Totals $335 Billion
      • Part-Time Work Common
      • Teens Hit Hard by Poor Economy
      • Higher Education Remains Elusive Goal for Most Youths
    • Family, Friends, and Roommates
      • Most Teens Still Live with Parents
      • Most Teens Get Along with Their Parents
      • Most Youths in Early 20s Are on Their Own
      • Many Young Women Have Own Families
      • Young Women More Likely to Marry and to Be Parents
    • Consumer Expenditure Patterns
      • Under-25 Consumer Differs from Average Consumer
      • Young Single Consumers Better Educated than Other Under-25 Consumers
      • Under-25 Consumer Units Highly Influential in Key Expenditure Categories
      • Single Young Men Spend More on Eating Out
      • Young Single Women Place High Priority on Clothes
    • Highlights of Consumer Behavior
      • Young Women Shop More and Like It More than the Average U.S. Woman
      • Young Men More Interested in Shopping than Average U.S. Male
      • Young Male Consumers More Brand Loyal
      • Celebrities' Influence on Fashion Choices of Young Women Grows Stronger
      • Calorie Counting Not an Issue for 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Teen Girls More Concerned about Dieting
      • Healthy Eating Has Lower Priority
      • But Vegetarians More Common in Youth Market
      • Healthy Snack Foods Not an Issue
      • Frozen Dinners and Pre-Cooked Meals Get Nod from Young Consumers
      • Young Consumers More Adventurous In Food Choices
      • Teens More Conservative with Finances
      • Young Consumers Less Afraid of Stock Market
    • Impact of Technology and the Internet on the Youth Market
      • Teens' Ownership of Cell Phones Explodes
      • Text Messaging and Other Data Services Take Off in Youth Market
      • Surveys Show Above-Average Use of Data Services by Young Cell Phone Subscribers
      • Portable Digital Audio Players Take Hold in Youth Market
      • Teens Use the Internet the Most
      • Online Activities Analyzed
      • Older Youths More Likely to Buy Online
    • Media Usage and Entertainment Choices
      • Internet Continues to Affect Media Usage of Youth
      • Teens Turn to Internet for Music and Sports, Older Youth for News and Information
      • Older Teens Grow More Negative toward TV
      • 18- to 24-Year-Olds Less Involved with Television
      • Teens Prefer Computers to Books
      • Teen Girls Lead in Movie Attendance
      • Live Events Important Entertainment Options for 18- to 24-Year- Olds
      • Video Games Lose Favor as Teens Get Older
      • Online Games Popular among Young Women
    • The College Segment
      • Full-Time Four-Year Enrollment Tops 6.8 Million
      • Nearly 50% of Full-Time College Students Have Jobs
      • College Students Most Likely to Own Cell Phones
      • Text Messaging More Common on Campuses
      • Nearly All College Students Online
      • Online Banking Popular with College Students
      • Female College Students More Likely to Buy Online
      • Media Habits of College Men Most Affected by Internet
      • Downloading Music Major Pastime for Students
    • The Multicultural Urban Youth Segment
      • Mobile Media Capabilities Less Common among Young Multicultural Males
      • Urban Youth Less Likely to Multitask When Watching Television
      • Choices of Radio Formats Reveal Cultural Differences
      • Opening Weekend Favored by Young Moviegoers
      • Urban Youth Less Likely to Play Video Games
      • Multicultural Urban Youth More Interested in Trying New Foods
      • Dieting More Common
      • Urban Apparel Brands Hit Speed Bump
    • Size and Growth of the Market
      • Expenditures of 15- to 24-Year-Olds Total $485 Billion
      • Young Women Spend Nearly as Much as Young Men
      • Family Expenditures on 15- to 17-Year-Olds Are Major Factor in Youth Market
      • Youth Market Will Total $555 Billion in 2009
    • Marketing and Advertising Trends
      • Few Teens Swayed by Advertising
      • Advertising in Movie Theatres Works Well in Youth Market
      • Young Males Prime Targets for TV Commercials
      • Young Women Drawn to Magazine Ads
      • Teens Most Likely to Disparage Online Advertising Techniques
      • "Third-Screen" Marketing Reaches Critical Mass
      • Study Questions Effectiveness of Stand-Alone Mobile Advertising
      • Video Games Seen as Underutilized Advertising Platform
    • Trends and Opportunities
      • Today's Youth Market Reveals the Future for Marketers
      • Technology Trumps Traditional Teen Choices
      • Female Gamers and Techies Deserve Marketers' Attention
  • Overview of the Youth Population
    • Size and Growth of Population
      • Youth Population Totals 41 Million
        • (Table) Size of Youth Population by Selected Age Groups, 2004 (in thousands)
      • Youth Population Skewed toward Males
        • (Table) Size of the 15- to 24-Year-Old Population by Gender and Age Group, 2004 (in thousands)
      • Youth Population Will Register Below-Average Growth
        • (Table) Growth in the 15- to 24-Year-Old Population by Age Group, 2004 vs. 2009 (in thousands)
        • (Table) Growth of U.S. Population by Age Group, 2004 vs. 2009 (in thousands)
    • The Multicultural Youth Population
      • Nearly 40% of Youth Are Members of Multicultural Population Segments
        • (Table) Race and Hispanic Origin of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2004 (in thousands)
        • (Table) Non-Hispanic White Population by Age Group, 2004 (in thousands)
      • Multicultural Trend to Continue
        • (Table) Growth of the 15- to 24-Year-Old Population, Non-Hispanic Whites vs. Other Population Groups, 2005 vs. 2010 (in thousands)
        • (Table) Growth of the 15- to 24-Year-Old Population by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2005 vs. 2010 (in thousands)
  • Work, School, and Money
    • Income Sources
      • Aggregate Income Totals $335 Billion
        • (Table) Aggregate Income of 15- to 24-Year-Olds, by Age Group and Gender, 2003
      • Income Sources of 15- to 24-Year-Olds Reflect Stage in Life
        • (Table) Sources of Income, 15- to 24-Year-Olds vs. People 25 Years Old and Over, 2003
      • Below-Average Incomes Mean Above-Average Expenditures
        • (Table) Average Annual Expenditures of Consumer Units as Percent of Before-Tax Income, by Age Group, 2003
    • Employment Patterns and Earning Power
      • Part-Time Work Common
        • (Table) Full-Time vs. Part-Time Status of Working 16- to 24-Year-Olds, 2004 (in thousands)
      • Young Men Earn the Most
        • (Table) Aggregate Earnings of 18- to 24-Year-Olds, 2003
      • Youth Employment Peaks in Summer Months
        • (Table) Employment Status of 16- to 24-Year-Olds, April-July 2004 (in thousands)
      • High School Dropouts Fare Poorly in Labor Market
        • (Table) Labor Force Status of 2004 High School Graduates and 2003-2004 High School Dropouts (in thousands)
      • College Grads Do Well
        • (Table) Mean Income of 18- to 24-Year-Olds with Earnings, by Educational Attainment and Work Experience, 2003
    • Economic Trends
      • Teens Hit Hard by Poor Economy
        • (Table) Mean and Aggregate Income of 15- to 17-Year-Olds, 2000-2003
      • Economic Slump Cuts Youth Employment
      • Older Youth Less Affected by Economic Downturn
        • (Table) Mean and Aggregate Income of 18- to 24-Year-Olds, 2000-2003
        • (Table) Trends in Economic Status of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2000 vs. 2003
      • Latino Youth Fare Better
        • (Table) Aggregate Income of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2003
        • (Table) Trends in Economic Status of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Race and Hispanic Origin
    • School Enrollment
      • Higher Education Remains Elusive Goal for Most Youths
        • (Table) School Enrollment of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, Full-Time vs. Part-Time, October 2003 (in thousands)
        • (Table) College Enrollment of 18- to 24-Year-Olds, by Attendance Status and Type of Institution, October 2003 (in thousands)
      • Community Colleges Maintain Role
        • (Table) 18- to 24-Year-Old College Students, 4-Year vs. 2-Year Institutions, October 2003 (in thousands)
  • Family, Friends, and Roommates
    • Teens and Their Families and Friends
      • Most Teens Still Live with Parents
        • (Table) Living Arrangements of 15- to 17-Year-Olds, 2003 (in thousands)
      • Most Teens Are Comfortable with Their Families
        • (Table) 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Views of Their Family by Gender and Race and Hispanic Origin
      • Most Get Along with Their Parents
        • (Table) 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Views of Parents by Gender and Race and Hispanic Origin
      • Boys Place a Higher Value on Friends
        • (Table) The Importance of Friends, 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender and Race and Hispanic Origin
    • Living Arrangements of 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Most Youths in Early 20s Are on Their Own
        • (Table) Living Arrangements of 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2003 (in thousands)
      • Living in Parents' Home Now Less Common
        • (Table) Percent of 18- to 24-Year-Olds Living with Their Parents, 1990-2003
      • Many Young Women Have Own Families
        • (Table) Living Arrangements of 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender, 2003 (in thousands)
      • Young Women More Likely to Marry
        • (Table) Marital Status of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2003 (in thousands)
        • (Table) Marital Status of 20- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender, 2003 (in thousands)
      • Many Young Women Are Mothers
        • (Table) Number of 15- to 24-Year-Old Women Who Have Ever Had a Child, by Marital Status, 2002 (in thousands)
        • (Table) Percent of 15- to 24-Year-Old Women Who Have Ever Had a Child, by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2000 (in thousands)
  • Consumer Behavior
    • Profile of Under-25 Consumer Units
      • Consumer Units Defined
      • Under-25 Consumer Differs from Average Consumer
        • (Table) Characteristics of Consumer Units, Under-25 vs. All Consumer Units, 2003-2004
      • Young Single Consumers Better Educated than Other Under-25 Consumers
        • (Table) Characteristics of Under-25 Consumer Units, Single vs. Others, 2003-2004
    • Consumer Expenditure Patterns
      • Differences in Consumer Expenditures Analyzed
        • (Table) Analysis of Consumer Expenditures of Under-25 Households
      • Single Young Men Spend More on Eating Out
        • (Table) Selected Expenditures of Single Male Consumer Units, Under-25 vs. All Single Male Consumer Units, 2003-2004
      • Young Single Women Place High Priority on Clothes
        • (Table) Selected Expenditures of Single Female Consumer Units, Under-25 vs. All Single Female Consumer Units, 2003-2004
  • Highlights of Consumer Behavior
    • Shopping Behavior
      • Young Women Shop More and Like It More than the Average U.S. Woman
        • (Table) Young Consumers' Attitudes toward the Importance of Shopping, by Gender
      • Gender Differences in Shopping Habits Formed during Teen Years
      • Young Men More Interested in Shopping than Average U.S. Male
        • (Table) In-Store Shopping Behavior of Young Consumers, by Gender
      • Price Sensitivity on the Rise
        • (Table) Price Sensitivity of Young Consumers, 2002 vs. 2004
      • Young Male Consumers More Brand Loyal
        • (Table) Brand Loyalty of Young Consumers, by Gender
      • Brand Attachments Forming Earlier than Before
      • Attitudes toward Shopping Formed in Teen Years
        • (Table) Attitudes toward Shopping as a Social Experience, by Gender
        • (Table) Shopping Patterns of 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Friends' Opinions Major Factor in Buying Decisions of Teens
    • Fashion
      • Interest in Fashion Declines with Age
      • Celebrities' Influence on Fashion Choices of Young Women Grows Stronger
      • Fashion Magazines Also Important
      • Many Young Consumers Have Conservative Tastes
        • (Table) Young Consumers' Attitudes toward Fashion and Style, by Gender
      • New Clothes a High Priority for Young Consumers
        • (Table) Young Consumers' Attitudes toward Buying Clothes by Gender
      • Most Teens Cautious about Standing Out in a Crowd
        • (Table) Attitudes toward Fashion of 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Teen Boys More Confident in Their Looks
        • (Table) Attitudes toward Appearance of 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
    • Food
      • Calorie Counting Not an Issue for 18- to 24-Year-Olds
        • (Table) Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Fattening Foods by Gender
        • (Table) Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Dieting by Gender
      • Teen Girls More Concerned about Dieting
        • (Table) 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Attitudes toward Dieting by Gender
      • Healthy Eating Has Lower Priority
        • (Table) Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Healthy Eating by Gender
        • (Table) 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Attitudes toward Healthy Eating by Gender
      • But Vegetarians More Common in Youth Market
      • Healthy Snack Foods Not an Issue
        • (Table) Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Snack Foods by Gender
      • Frozen Dinners and Pre-Cooked Meals Get Nod from Young Consumers
        • (Table) Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Frozen and Store-Made Dinners by Gender
      • Young Consumers More Adventurous In Food Choices
        • (Table) Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Food Styles by Gender
        • (Table) Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Trying New Foods by Gender
      • Teen Boys Least Worried about Fast Food
        • (Table) 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Attitudes toward Eating Out and Fast Food by Gender
    • Personal Finances
      • Young Consumers Financially Insecure
      • Teens More Conservative with Finances
        • (Table) Selected Attitudes toward Personal Finances of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • Young Consumers Lack Confidence in Financial Management Skills
        • (Table) Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Financial Management Skills by Gender
      • Young Consumers Less Afraid of Stock Market
      • Teens Distrust Credit Cards
        • (Table) 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Attitudes toward Credit Cards by Gender
      • Many Teens Tend to Be Savers
        • (Table) 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Attitudes toward Saving by Gender
      • Savings Accounts Common
        • (Table) Percent of 15- to 17-Year-Olds with Bank Accounts by Gender
      • Young Consumers Use ATM Cards More
      • Checking Accounts Rare
        • (Table) Use of Banking Services by 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender
  • Impact of Technology and the Internet on the Youth Market
    • The Rise of Mobile Media Platforms
      • Teens' Ownership of Cell Phones Explodes
      • Cell Phone Use by 18- to 24-Year-Olds Also High
      • Text Messaging and Other Data Services Take Off in Youth Market
      • Surveys Show Above-Average Use of Data Services by Young Cell Phone Subscribers
      • Youths More Likely to Subscribe to Ancillary Cell Phone Services
        • (Table) Cell Phone Services Used by 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Portable Digital Audio Players Take Hold in Youth Market
    • Youth and the Internet
      • Personal Computers Now in Nearly All Teens' Homes
        • (Table) Household Ownership of Computers, 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • Young Women More Likely to Own Personal Computer
        • (Table) Ownership of Home Computers by 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Demographic Characteristic
      • Teens Use the Internet the Most
        • (Table) Use of the Internet by 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • Teens' Lives Transformed Most by the Internet
        • (Table) Impact of Internet on Lifestyles of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • Popular Web Sites Listed
        • (Table) Web Sites Popular with 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
        • (Table) Web Sites Popular with 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Online Activities Analyzed
        • (Table) Online Activities of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • Older Youths More Likely to Buy Online
        • (Table) Internet Orders by 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
  • Media Usage and Entertainment Choices
    • Overview
      • Internet Continues to Affect Media Usage of Youth
        • (Table) Impact of Internet on Media Usage and Entertainment Habits of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • Teens More Likely to Rely on Internet for Entertainment
      • Teens Turn to Internet for Music and Sports, Older Youth for News and Information
        • (Table) Online Media Usage of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
    • Print Media
      • Young Consumers Look to Magazines More than Newspapers
        • (Table) Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Newspapers and Magazines by Gender
      • Leading Teen Magazines Listed
        • (Table) Magazines Popular with to 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Magazines for Teen Girls Experience Declines
      • Magazine Choices of 18- to 24-Year-Olds Show Broad Interests
        • (Table) Magazines Popular with 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender
    • Television
      • Older Teens Grow More Negative toward TV
      • 18- to 24-Year-Olds Less Involved with Television
        • (Table) Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Television by Gender
      • Young Viewers Interested in Video on Demand
        • (Table) Type of Cable Service Used by 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • MTV Tops Teen TV Choices
        • (Table) Cable TV Services Watched in Last 7 Days by 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
        • (Table) Cable TV Services on Top-25 Lists of Both 15- to 17-Year-Old Boys and Girls
      • MTV Also Top Choice of 18- to 24-Year-Olds
        • (Table) Cable TV Services Watched in Last 7 Days by 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Many TV Favorites Cross Age Boundaries in Youth Market
        • (Table) Cable TV Services on Top-20 Lists of Both 15- to 17-Year-Olds and 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Fox and NBC Favored by Young Viewers
        • (Table) Broadcast Networks Viewed by 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • Clear Gender Differences in Program Preferences
        • (Table) TV Show Types Viewed by 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
    • Radio
      • Radio Gets Less Attention from 18- to 24-Year-Olds
        • (Table) Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Radio, by Gender
      • Top Radio Formats Listed
        • (Table) Radio Formats Popular with 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
        • (Table) Radio Formats Popular with 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Portable Digital Audio Players Seen as Threat to Traditional Radio
    • Entertainment Choices
      • Hanging Out with Friends Matters Most to Teens
        • (Table) 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Attitudes toward Free Time by Gender
      • Teens Prefer Computers to Books
        • (Table) Attitudes toward Books and Reading of 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Sports Still Important to Teens
        • (Table) 15- to 17-Year-Olds' Attitudes toward Sports by Gender
      • Teen Girls Lead in Movie Attendance
        • (Table) Movie Attendance by 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
      • TV Commercials Drive Movie Choices
        • (Table) Reasons for Seeing Last Movie, 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Live Events Important Entertainment Option for 18- to 24-Year- Olds
        • (Table) Attendance at Live Entertainment Events by 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Teen Girls Focus More on Music
        • (Table) Attitudes toward Music of 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
        • (Table) Music Types Bought by 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Video Games Lose Favor as Teens Get Older
        • (Table) Frequency of Use of Video Games by 15- to 17-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Online Games Popular among Young Women
        • (Table) Use of Video Games by 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
  • The College Segment
    • Overview
      • Full-Time Four-Year Enrollment Tops 6.8 Million
        • (Table) Enrollment in Degree-Granting Institutions by 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2- Year vs. 4-Year Institutions, 2003 (in thousands)
        • (Table) Full-Time Enrollment in Degree-Granting Institutions by 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, Undergraduate vs. Graduate Levels 2003 (in thousands)
      • Women Predominate on College Campuses
        • (Table) Men and Women as Percent of Full-time Enrollment by 18- to 24-Year-Olds in Degree- Granting Institutions (in thousands)
      • Minorities Remain Underrepresented on College Campuses
        • (Table) Full-Time Enrollment in Degree-Granting Institutions by 18- to 24-Year-Olds, by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2003 (in thousands)
        • (Table) Race and Hispanic Origin of 18- to 24-Year-Old Full-time Students in Degree-Granting Institutions vs. Race and Hispanic Origin of All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Nearly 50% of Full-Time College Students Have Jobs
        • (Table) Employment of Full-Time 18- to 24-Year-Old College Students by Age Group, 2003 (in thousands)
        • (Table) Employment of Full-Time 18- to 24-Year-Old Male College Students by Age Group, 2003 (in thousands)
        • (Table) Employment of Full-Time 18- to 24-Year-Old Female College Students by Age Group, 2003 (in thousands)
    • Technology and the Student Consumer
      • College Students Most Likely to Own Cell Phones
      • Text Messaging More Common on Campuses
      • Computers Most Likely to Be Found in Dorm Rooms and Apartments of College Students
      • Nearly All College Students Online
        • (Table) Use of the Internet, 18- to 24-Year-Old Full-Time College Students vs. All 18- to 24- Year-Olds
      • Lives of College Students Most Affected by the Internet
        • (Table) Impact of Internet on Lifestyles, 18- to 24-Year-Old Full-Time College Students vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Top Web Destinations Listed
        • (Table) Popular Web Sites, 18- to 24-Year-Old Full-Time College Students vs. All 18- to 24- Year-Olds
      • Online Banking Popular with College Students
        • (Table) Online Activities, 18- to 24-Year-Old Full-Time College Students vs. All 18- to 24-Year- Olds
      • Female College Students More Likely to Buy Online
        • (Table) Internet Orders, 18- to 24-Year-Old Full-Time College Students vs. All 18- to 24-Year- Olds
    • Trends in Media Usage and Entertainment
      • Media Habits of College Men Most Affected by Internet
        • (Table) Impact of Internet on Media Usage Habits, 18- to 24-Year-Old Full-Time College Students vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Study Shows Substantial Out-of-Home TV Watching by College Men
      • MTV Expands to College Market
      • New Magazines Hope to Capture Attention of College Students
      • Data Show Average Use of Internet for Entertainment
      • Downloading Music Major Pastime for Students
      • Portable Digital Audio Players Part of the Campus Scene
    • Selected Market Trends
      • Research on Student Brand Loyalty Differs
      • Survey Research Continues to Show Substantial Buying Power for College Students
      • Savvy Retailers Prosper by Creating Annual "Back-to-College" Buying Event
      • Event-Based Campaigns Remain in Favor
  • The Multicultural Urban Youth Segment
    • Introduction
      • Background
      • Multicultural Urban Youth Segment Defined
    • Media and Entertainment Trends
      • Mobile Media Capabilities Less Common among Young Multicultural Males
        • (Table) Cell Phone Ownership and Use, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
        • (Table) Cell Phone Ownership and Use, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17-Year-Olds
      • Urban Teens Less Likely to Have Home Internet Access
        • (Table) Use of the Internet, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17-Year-Olds
      • Internet Affects Multicultural Media Habits
        • (Table) Impact of Internet on Media Usage, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year- Olds
      • Young Multicultural Consumers Like Magazines
        • (Table) Attitudes toward Magazines, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Urban Youth Less Likely to Multitask When Watching Television
        • (Table) Attitudes toward Television, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Top TV Network Choices Listed
        • (Table) Leading Television Broadcasting Networks, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24- Year-Olds
        • (Table) Broadcast Networks Viewed, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17- Year-Olds
      • Gender Gap Revealed in Radio Listening
        • (Table) Attitudes toward Radio, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • Choices of Radio Formats Reveal Cultural Differences
        • (Table) Leading Radio Formats, Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
    • Opening Weekend Favored by Young Moviegoers
      • (Table) Movie Attendance, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • (Table) Movie Attendance, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17-Year-Olds
    • Urban Youth Less Likely to Play Video Games
    • Young Urban Males Likely to Have Portable Digital Audio Players
    • Urban Teens More Aware of Top 10 Music Hits
      • (Table) Attitudes toward Music, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17-Year- Olds
  • Highlights of Consumer Attitudes and Behavior
    • Urban Youth More Receptive to Advertising
      • (Table) Receptivity to Advertising, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • (Table) Attitudes toward Television Advertising, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24- Year-Olds
    • Multicultural Urban Youth Trendsetters Analyzed
      • (Table) Trendsetting Attitudes, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
    • Urban Teens Less Focused on Fashion
      • (Table) Attitudes toward Fashion, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17- Year-Olds
    • Multicultural Urban Youth More Interested in Trying New Foods
      • (Table) Attitudes toward Trying New Foods, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year- Olds
    • Urban Youth Gravitate to Fast Food
      • (Table) Attitudes toward Eating Out and Fast Food, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17-Year-Olds
      • (Table) Attitudes toward Fast Foods, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
    • Fattening Foods Concern Young Multicultural Urban Males
      • (Table) Attitudes toward Fattening Foods, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
    • Dieting More Common
      • (Table) Attitudes toward Dieting, Multicultural Urban 15- to 17-Year-Olds vs. All 15- to 17-Year- Olds
      • (Table) Attitudes toward Dieting, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
      • (Table) Attitudes toward Healthy Eating, Multicultural Urban Youth vs. All 18- to 24-Year-Olds
  • Trends in the Urban Youth Market
    • Urban Apparel Brands Hit Speed Bump
    • Hip-Hop Magazine Faces Challenge
    • Tried-and-True Urban Marketing Techniques Still Used
    • Pepsi Looks to DJs to Promote Brand
    • New Product Launches Seek to Affiliate with Hip-Hop Culture
  • Market Trends
    • Size and Growth of the Market
      • Scope of Youth Market Defined
      • Expenditures Outpace Incomes
        • (Table) Expenditures of Under-25 Consumer Units as Percent of Before-Tax Income, by Marital Status, 2003
      • Expenditures of 15- to 24-Year-Olds Total $485 Billion
        • (Table) Expenditures of 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2004
      • Young Women Spend Nearly as Much as Young Men
        • (Table) Expenditures of 18- to 24-Year-Olds by Gender, 2004
      • Family Expenditures on 15- to 17-Year-Olds Are Major Factor in Youth Market
        • (Table) Aggregate Annual Family Expenditures on 15-to 17-Year-Olds for Selected Consumer Products, 2004
      • Under-25 Consumer Units Play Important Role in Consumer Spending
        • (Table) Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Under-25 Consumer Units for Food and Beverages, 2003 (in millions)
        • (Table) Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Under-25 Consumer Units for Household Furnishings and Equipment, 2003 (in millions)
        • (Table) Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Under-25 Consumer Units for Apparel, 2003 (in millions)
        • (Table) Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Under-25 Consumer Units for Transportation, 2003 (in millions)
        • (Table) Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Under-25 Consumer Units for Entertainment, 2003 (in millions)
        • (Table) Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Under-25 Consumer Units for Personal-Care Products and Services, Reading Materials, and Education, 2003 (in millions)
    • Growth of the Youth Market
      • Slow Growth Likely
      • Youth Market Will Total $555 Billion in 2009
        • (Table) Projected Growth in Expenditures by 15- to 17-Year-Olds, 2004-2009
        • (Table) Projected Growth in Buying Power of 18- to 24-Year-Olds, 2004-2009
        • (Table) Projected Growth in Buying Power of 15- to 24-Year-Olds, 2002-2007
  • Marketing and Advertising Trends
    • Receptivity to Advertising
      • Few Teens Swayed by Advertising
        • (Table) Attitudes of 15- to 17-Year-Olds toward Advertising by Gender
      • Older Youths Less Negative toward Ads
        • (Table) Receptivity of 18- to 24-Year-Olds to Advertising, by Gender
      • Advertising in Movie Theatres Works Well in Youth Market
        • (Table) Receptivity of 15- to 24-Year-Olds to Advertising in Movie Theatres by Age Group and Gender
      • Young Males Prime Targets for TV Commercials
        • (Table) Fast Forwarding on VCRs by 15- to 24-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender
        • (Table) Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Television Ads, by Gender
      • Young Women Drawn to Magazine Ads
        • (Table) Attitudes of 18- to 24-Year-Olds toward Print Advertising, by Gender
      • Teens Most Likely to Disparage Online Advertising Techniques
        • (Table) Percent of 15- to 24-Year-Olds Viewing Internet Advertising as "Not at All Useful," by Type of Ad
    • Emerging Marketing Strategies and Advertising Platforms
      • "Third-Screen" Marketing Reaches Critical Mass
      • "American Idol" Promotion Seals Deal for Mobile Marketers
      • New Hand-Held Media Devices May Capture Advertisers' Attention
      • Opinions Differ on Effectiveness of Stand-Alone Mobile Advertising
      • Integrated "Three-Screen" Marketing Approach Seen as More Effective
      • Video Games Seen as Underutilized Advertising Platform
      • More Advertisers Turn to In-Game Advertising
      • Gamers Get to Order Pizza Online
    • Examples of Marketing and Advertising Approaches
      • Frito-Lay Reaches Out to Young People with Text Messaging
      • Burger King Appeals to Young Men with Big Appetites
      • McDonalds Shifts Focus to Young Adults
      • Reebok Experiments with Video-on-Demand
  • Trends and Opportunities
    • Key Market Trends Summarized
      • (Table) Key Trends Shaping the Youth Market, 2005-2010
    • Today's Youth Market Reveals the Future for Marketers
    • Young Consumers Lead Mobile Media Revolution
    • Technology Trumps Traditional Teen Choices
    • Economic Trends and Boomer Parents behind Delayed Adulthood
    • Female Gamers and Techies Deserve Marketers' Attention
    • Opportunities Come and Go with Constant State of Flux in Youth Market
    • Marketers Need to Track Shifting Consumer Attitudes and Behavior
    • Food Marketers Face Complex and Conflicted Consumers in Youth Market