The U.S. African-American Market, 5th Edition

Packaged Facts
January 1, 2004
252 Pages - SKU: LA888595
Attention: There is an updated edition available for this report.
Chapter 1: Executive Summary
  • Introduction
    • Background
    • Overview of Report

  • Scope and Methodology
    • Market Definition
    • Methodology

  • Current Population Trends
    • Size of Black Population Depends on How It Is Defined
    • Blacks Account for One in Eight Americans
    • Black Population Will Approach 40 Million in 2008
    • Most Blacks Continue to Live in South

  • Economic Profile
    • Household Income Increased at Above-Average Rate
    • Blacks’ Income and Earnings Higher than Hispanics’
    • Household Income Analyzed
    • Majority of Black Married-Couple Families Have Incomes of $50,000+

  • Household and Family Structure
    • Family Households Predominate
    • African American Kids More Likely to Live with Moms and Grandparents
    • Black Kids as Likely To Be Only Children
    • More African American Kids Have Working Moms

  • Social Indicators
    • African American College Enrollment Continues to Rise
    • Health Profile of African Americans Less Favorable
    • Blacks Most Politically Active Minority Group
    • African Americans More Religious than Other Population Segments

  • Overview of African American Consumers
    • Blacks Spend More on Apparel
    • Food Expenditures Have High Priority
    • More Spent on TVs and Audio Equipment
    • African Americans View Selves as Trendsetters
    • African Americans Like to Shop
    • Brand Switching More Common
    • African American Shoppers Go Out of Their Way to Shop at Favorite Stores
    • Research Suggests African Americans Remain on Other Side of Digital Divide

  • Affluent African American Consumers
    • Number of Affluent Black Households Doubled in Late 1990s
    • Married-Couple Families Predominate among Affluent Blacks
    • More than 9 Million African Americans Live in Affluent Households
    • More Women Work in Affluent Black Families
    • Most Affluent Black Families Have No Children at Home
    • Fewer Financial Services Used
    • Affluent Black Families Above-Average Users of Telecommunications Services
    • Affluent Blacks Remain Underserved

  • African American Women
    • Women Head Nearly Half of Black Households
    • Nearly Half of African American Women Have Attended College
    • Black Women Are Major Earners
    • More than 2 Million African American Women Work as Executives and Managers
    • More than 1.7 Million Black Women Have Above-Average Earnings
    • African American Women Pursue Style and Fashion
    • Black Women Buy More New Clothes
    • Women Key Decision-Makers in African American Households

  • African Americans and the Urban Youth Consumer Culture
    • Hip-Hop Movement Created and Developed by African Americans
    • Urban Youth Culture Now Part of Mainstream
    • African Americans Continue to Drive Urban Youth Culture
    • Trendsetting Young African Americans Influence Lucrative Market Segment
    • Designer Labels Important
    • Owning a New Car Important to Young African Americans
    • More Marketers Turn to Hip-Hop Culture

  • Marketing and Advertising Trends
    • African American Advertising Seen as Changing over Time
    • Celebrities Remain Important
    • Churches Can Be Helpful Grassroots Marketing Partners
    • Bank of America Reaches Out to African American Consumers
    • Blacks Highly Receptive to TV Advertising
    • Coca-Cola Looks to Young Trendsetting African Americans
    • U.S. and Japanese Automakers Target Multicultural Buyers

  • African Americans and the Media
    • African Americans Look to Magazines
    • New Magazines Target Affluent Segment
    • Black Newspapers Struggle to Survive
    • African Americans Focus on Television
    • Movie Channels Major Draw for Black Viewers
    • Urban Contemporary Tops List of Radio Formats
    • Internet Changes Media Usage Habits
    • African Americans More Likely to Download Music Files

  • African American Buying Power
    • African Americans Responsible for Increasing Share of Total Consumer Expenditures
    • Buying Power of Black Women Will Increase 35.2%
    • Buying Power of Affluent African Americans Will Reach $479 Billion
    • African American Buying Power Will Exceed $900 Billion in 2008

  • Geographic Trends in the African American Market
    • Migration to South Continues
    • Blacks Join Exodus to Suburbs
    • Suburban Growth Creates New African American Market Segment

  • Trends and Opportunities in the African American Market
    • Shift in “Ethnic Marketing” Underway
    • Parameters of African American Marketing Start to Blur
    • Multicultural Approach Needs Right Perspective
    • Growing Diversity of Black Population Affects Marketing Strategies
    • Upward Mobility by African Americans Creates More Possibilities for Marketers
    • African American Consumers Still Represent Untapped Market

  • Section 1: The African American Population Today

Chapter 2: Current Population Trends

  • Race and African American Identity
    • Black Population Subject to Complex Definitions
    • Size of Black Population Depends on How It Is Defined
    • Table 2-1: Profile of the Black Population of the United States, by Race Alone and Hispanic Origin
    • Nearly 3 Million Blacks Are Foreign-Born
    • Table 2-2: Foreign-Born Population, by Race and Hispanic Origin
    • Table 2-3: Immigration from Selected Countries, 1981-2002

  • Population Growth Patterns
    • Blacks Account for One in Eight Americans
    • Table 2-4: U.S. Population by Race and Hispanic Origin
    • Black Population Will Approach 40 Million in 2008
    • Table 2-5: Population Growth, Blacks vs. Other Population Groups, April 2000 to July 2002
    • Table 2-6: Projected Population Growth, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 2003-2008
    • Table 2-7: African Americans and Other Population Groups as Percent of U.S. Population, 2003-2008

  • Age and Gender
    • Black Population Skews Younger than Average
    • Table 2-8: Population by Age Group, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Table 2-9: African Americans as Percent of Total Population by Selected Age Group
    • African American Women Significantly Outnumber Men
    • Table 2-10: Population by Gender, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups

  • Geographic Distribution of the African American Population
    • Most Blacks Continue to Live in South
    • Table 2-11: African American Population by Region
    • Table 2-12: African Americans as Percent of Total Population of Region
    • New York Has Largest Black Population
    • Table 2-13: States with Largest African American Populations
    • Southern States Have Highest Proportion of Blacks
    • Table 2-14: States with Highest Percentage of African Americans
    • Hispanic Blacks Concentrated in Handful of States
    • Table 2-15: States with the Largest Populations of Hispanic Blacks
    • Table 2-16: Hispanic Blacks as Percentage of Total Black Population, by State
    • Southern and Border States Least Likely to Have Multicultural Orientation
    • Table 2-17: Non-Hispanic Blacks Alone as Percentage of Total Black Population, by State)
    • More Blacks Live in Central Cities
    • Table 2-18: African American Population by Metropolitan vs. Non-Metropolitan Residence

Chapter 3: Economic Profile

  • Income Levels
    • Household Income Increased at Above-Average Rate
    • Table 3-1: Aggregate Household Income, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 1981 vs. 2002
    • Blacks’ Income and Earnings Higher than Hispanics’
    • Table 3-2: Mean Income of People 15 Years and Over, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Table 3-3: Earnings of Full-Time, Year-Round Workers 15 Years and Over, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Household Income Analyzed
    • Table 3-4: Mean Household and Family Income, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Table 3-5: Income per Household Member, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Table 3-6: Total Money Income of Households by Type, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Majority of Black Married-Couple Families Have Incomes of $50,000+
    • Table 3-7: Total Money Income of Families by Type, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Most African American Families Own Homes
    • Table 3-8: Tenure by Household Type, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Number of African American Homeowners Grows at Faster Rate
    • Table 3-9: Number of Homeowners, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 1994-2002
    • Table 3-10: Growth in Number of New Homeowners, African Americans vs. Others, 1995-2002

  • Employment and Occupational Patterns
    • More Black Women in Labor Force
    • Table 3-11: Labor Force Status, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Table 3-12: Employment Status of the Population 16 Years of Age and Over, by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2002 51Chapter 3: Economic Profile [Cont.]
    • African Americans More Likely to Work in Public Sector
    • Table 3-13: Class of Worker, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • One in Five Blacks Holds Managerial or Professional Position
    • Table 3-14: Occupations, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 2002
    • Women More Likely to Hold Managerial and Professional Jobs
    • Table 3-15: Leading Occupations of African American Men and Women

Chapter 4: Household and Family Structure

  • Overview
    • Family Households Predominate
    • Table 4-1: Household Type, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Black Families Smaller than Hispanic and Asian Families
    • Table 4-2: Size of Family Households, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups

  • The Family Environment of African American Kids
    • Kids Comprise Above-Average Share of Black Population
    • Table 4-3: Under-18 Population by Selected Age Group, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • African American Kids More Likely to Live with Moms
    • Table 4-4: Marital Status of Parents and Living Arrangements of Children, African American Children vs. Other Children
    • Many Black Kids Live with Grandparents
    • Table 4-5: Children Living with Grandparents and Other Adults, African American Children vs. Other Children
    • Table 4-6: African American Children Living with Grandparents
    • African American Grandparents Play Major Childrearing Role
    • Table 4-7: Grandparents Living with Grandchildren, by Race and Hispanic Origin
    • Black Kids as Likely To Be Only Children
    • Table 4-8: Presence of Siblings in Families, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Younger Parents More Common
    • Table 4-9: Age of Parents, African American Children vs. Other Children,2002
    • African American Parents More Likely Than Other Minority Groups Be High School Graduates
    • Table 4-10: Education of Parents, African American Children vs. Other Children
    • More African American Kids Have Working Moms
    • Table 4-11: Labor Force Status of Parents, African American Children vs. Other Children, 2002
    • Table 4-12: Stay-at-Home Moms in Married-Couple Families with Children under 15, African American Children vs. Other Children
    • Nearly 3.3 Million Black Children Live in Families with $50,000+ Incomes
    • Table 4-13: Income of Families with Children, African American Children vs. Other Children
    • Table 4-14: Mean Income of Married-Couple Families with Children, African Americans vs Other Population Groups

Chapter 5: Social Indicators

  • Educational Attainment
    • 3.4 Million African Americans Are College Graduates
    • Table 5-1: Educational Attainment of the Population 25 Years and Over, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Educational Gender Gap Seen Reversed among Blacks
    • Table 5-2: Educational Attainment of Men 25 Years and Over, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Table 5-3: Educational Attainment of Women 25 Years and Over, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • African American College Enrollment Continues to Rise
    • Table 5-4: Enrollment Rates in Degree-Granting Institutions, by Race and Hispanic Origin, Selected Years, 1972-2001
    • Table 5-5: Enrollment in Degree-Granting Institutions, by Race and Hispanic Origin, 1980 vs. 2000
    • Table 5-6: Degrees Earned by African Americans, 1981 vs. 2000
    • Historically Black Colleges and Universities Continue to Play Major Role
    • Table 5-7: Enrollment in Historically Black Colleges and Universities, 2000
    • College Completion Affects Employment Rates

  • Health Status
    • Health Profile of African Americans Less Favorable
    • Table 5-8: Key Indicators of Health for U.S. Adults, by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2002
    • Above-Average Risks Seen in Numerous Areas
    • Access to Health Insurance and Medical Care Problematic
    • Table 5-9: Access to Health Insurance and Medical Care, by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2002
    • Study Finds Improvement in African American Health

  • Political and Social Values
    • Blacks Most Politically Active Minority Group
    • Table 5-10: Participation in 2000 Election, by Race and Hispanic Origin
    • African American Political Views Differ
    • Table 5-11: Political Profile of African Americans
    • African Americans More Religious than Other Population Segments
    • Social Views More Liberal
    • Table 5-12: Selected Social Values of African Americans

  • Section 2: Understanding the African American Consumer

Chapter 6: Overview of African American Consumers

  • Profile of African American Consumer Units
    • Consumer Units Defined
    • Black Households Spend More of Income
    • Table 6-1: Expenditures of African American Consumer Units as Percent of Before-Tax Income
    • Black Consumer Units Larger than Average
    • Table 6-2: Characteristics of Consumer Units, African American Consumer Units vs. Other Consumer Units

  • African American Consumer Expenditure Patterns
    • Blacks Spend More on Apparel
    • Table 6-3: Annual Expenditures for Apparel and Services by Percent of Total Expenditures, African Americans vs. Other Consumer Units
    • Most Automotive Expenditures Similar to Those of Other Consumers
    • Table 6-4: Annual Expenditures by African American Consumers for Vehicle Purchases and Related Expenses as Percent of Total Expenditures
    • Food Expenditures Have High Priority
    • Table 6-5: Annual Expenditures by Consumer Units for Food and Beverages, by Amount and as Percent of Total Consumer Expenditures, African Americans vs. Other Consumer Units
    • Table 6-6: Annual Expenditures by Consumer Units for Selected Categories of Food at Home, African Americans vs. Other Consumer Units
    • More Spent on TVs and Audio Equipment
    • Table 6-7: Annual Expenditures by Consumer Units for Entertainment, African Americans vs. Other Consumer Units
    • Black Households Spend on Furniture
    • Table 6-8: Annual Expenditures by Consumer Units for Household Furnishings and Equipment, by Amount and as Percent of Total Consumer Expenditures, African Americans vs. Others
    • Health Care Expenditures Below Average
    • Table 6-9: Annual Expenditures for Health Care by Percent of Total Expenditures, African Americans vs. Other Consumer Units

  • Shopping Behavior and Buying Patterns
    • African Americans View Selves as Trendsetters
    • Table 6-10: African Americans as Trendsetters, by Gender
    • Blacks Shop with Friends
    • Table 6-11: African American Attitudes toward Shopping as a Social Experience, by Gender
    • African Americans Like to Shop
    • Table 6-12: African Americans and the Importance of Shopping, by Gender
    • Low Prices Not Necessarily Most Important Draw for Black Shoppers
    • Table 6-13: Price Sensitivity of African Americans, by Gender
    • Brand Switching More Common
    • Table 6-14: Brand Loyalty of African Americans, by Gender
    • African American Shoppers Go Out of Their Way to Shop at Favorite Stores
    • Table 6-15: African Americans’ Criteria for Selecting Stores, by Gender
    • African American Consumers Take Their Time in Stores
    • Table 6-16: In-Store Shopping Behavior of African Americans, by Gender

  • African Americans and the Internet
    • Research Suggests African Americans Remain on Other Side of Digital Divide
    • Table 6-17: Use of Internet by African Americans, by Gender
    • African American Lives Less Affected by Internet
    • Table 6-18: Impact of the Internet on African American Lifestyles, by Gender
    • Blacks Less Likely to Shop Online
    • Table 6-19: Online Activities of African Americans, by Gender

Chapter 7: Affluent African American Consumers

  • Overview of Affluent African Americans
    • Number of Affluent Black Households Doubled in Late 1990s
    • Figure 7-1: Number of African American Households with Incomes of $60,000 or More, 1995 vs. 2003
    • Nearly 2.8 Million Households Have $60,000+ Incomes
    • Table 7-1: African American Households with Incomes of $60,000 or More, by Income Level
    • Affluent Black Households Control More than Half of Aggregate Income
    • Table 7-2: Aggregate Income of African American Households, Affluent vs. Other Households Married-Couple Families Predominate among Affluent Blacks
    • Table 7-3: African American Households with Incomes of $60,000 or More, by Type of Household
    • More than 9 Million African Americans Live in Affluent Households
    • Table 7-4: Number of People Living in African American Households, by Income Level
    • Table 7-5: Profile of People Living in African American Households with Incomes of $60,000 or More
    • African Americans in Wide Range of High-Income Jobs
    • Table 7-6: Aggregate Income of African Americans with High-Paying Occupations, by Occupation
    • Relatively Few Affluent Households Found in Deep South
    • Table 7-7: States with Largest Number of Affluent African American Households
    • One in Seven Affluent African American Households Are in New York Metro Area
    • Table 7-8: Metropolitan Areas with Largest Number of Affluent African American Households

  • Profile of Affluent African American Families
    • Number of Married-Couple Families Grew 10% in Late 1990s
    • Figure 7-2: Number of African American Married-Couple Families, 1995 vs. 2003
    • More Women Work in Affluent Black Families
    • Table 7-9: African American Families with Incomes of $60,000 and Over, by Type of Family
    • Fig. 7-3: Percent of Married-Couple Families with Incomes of $60,000 and Over with Wife in Paid Labor Force, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Most Affluent Black Families Have Children at Home
    • Table 7-10: African American Families with Incomes of $60,000 and Over, by Presence of Related Children under 18 Years
    • Kids Affect Brand Choices of Affluent Couples
    • Table 7-11: Family Attitudes toward Shopping with Their Kids
    • Affluent Black Couples Differ in Financial Management Views
    • Table 7-12: Attitudes of Affluent Couples toward Personal Financial Management, African Americans vs. Others
    • Fewer Financial Services Used
    • Table 7-13: Affluent African American Married Couples, Use of Financial Services
    • “Wealth Gap” Explains Behavioral Differences
    • Black Investors Choose Real Estate over Stock Market
    • Affluent Black Families Underserved by Home Electronics Marketers
    • Table 7-14: Affluent Family Attitudes toward Home Electronics, African Americans vs. Others
    • Table 7-15: Affluent Family Ownership of Home Electronics, African Americans vs. Others
    • Affluent Black Families Above-Average Users of Telecommunications Services
    • Table 7-16: Affluent Black Married Couples, Use of Telecommunications Services
    • Luxury and Looks Main Criteria When Choosing Cars
    • Table 7-17: Affluent Family Attitudes toward Automobiles
    • High-Income Blacks Aspire to Buy New Cars
    • Table 7-18: Affluent African American Family Consumer Attitudes, New vs. Used Cars
    • One-Car Households More Common
    • Table 7-19: Affluent African American Families, Vehicle Ownership Patterns
    • Foreign Cars Preferred
    • Table 7-20: Affluent African American Family Attitudes: Foreign vs. Domestic Cars

  • Strategic Implications
    • Growing Black Middle Class Creates New Opportunities
    • Affluent Blacks Remain Underserved
    • Rising Incomes Will Eventually Affect Financial Behavior

Chapter 8: African American Women

  • Demographic Overview
    • More Women in Black Population
    • Table 8-1: Population by Gender, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Black Women Less Likely to Marry
    • Table 8-2: Marital Status of 15- to 44-Year-Old Women by Age Group, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Table 8-3: Women Who Have Never Had Children, by Age and Race and Hispanic Origin
    • Women Head Nearly Half of Black Households
    • Table 8-4: Households Headed by Women, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Nearly Half of African American Women Have Attended College
    • Table 8-5: Educational Attainment of Women 25 Years and Over, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Black Women Are Major Earners
    • Table 8-6: Aggregate Income of Women, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • African American Women More Likely to Be in Labor Force
    • Table 8-7: Women in the Labor Force, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • More than 2 Million African American Women Work as Executives and Managers
    • Table 8-8: Leading Occupations of African American Women
    • Table 8-9: Top 10 Industries Employing African American Women
    • More than 1.7 Million Black Women Have Above-Average Earnings
    • Table 8-10: Earnings of Full-Time, Year-Round Female Workers 15 Years and Over, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Single Women Predominate in Upper Income Brackets
    • Table 8-11: African American Women Aged 18 and Over with Incomes of $35,000 or More, by Income Level and Marital Status

  • Consumer Profile
    • Advertisers Find Highly Receptive Audience among African American Women
    • Table 8-12: Attitudes of African American Women toward Advertising
    • African American Women Pursue Style and Fashion
    • Table 8-13: Attitudes of African American Women toward Fashion and Style
    • Black Women Buy More New Clothes
    • Table 8-14: Attitudes of African American Women toward Shopping and Buying Clothes
    • Clothing Brands Get Less Attention
    • Table 8-15; Attitudes of African American Women toward Apparel Brands
    • Use of Cosmetics Shows Differences
    • Table 8-16: Use of Cosmetics by African American Women
    • Table 8-17: Use of Hair-Care Products by African American Women
    • African American Women Feel Less Guilty about Food
    • Table 8-18: Attitudes of African American Women toward Nutrition and Dieting
    • African American Women Favor Tried-and-True Foods
    • Table 8-19: Attitudes of African American Women toward Food and Cooking

  • Strategic Implications
    • Women Are Powerful Economic Force in African American Market
    • Women Key Decision-Makers in African American Households
    • Some Experts See Marketers Ignoring African American Women

Chapter 9: African Americans and the Urban Youth Consumer Culture

  • Overview
    • Hip-Hop at Center of Urban Youth Culture
    • Hip-Hop Movement Created and Developed by African Americans
    • Urban Youth Culture Now Part of Mainstream
    • African Americans Continue to Drive Urban Youth Culture
    • Young African Americans Remain Central Force in Urban Settings
    • Table 9-1: Metropolitan Areas by Population of 15- to 24-Year-Old African Americans
    • Income of Young African Americans Nears $100 Billion
    • Table 9-2: Aggregate Income of 15- to 29-Year-Old African Americans, by Gender and Age Group
    • Trendsetting Young African Americans Influence Lucrative Market Segment
    • Figure 9-1: Aggregate Income of 15- to 29-Year-Olds, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups

  • Young African Americans as Trendsetters
    • Style and Fashion Key Element of Culture
    • Table 9-3: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Fashion and Style, African Americans vs. Others
    • Buying New Clothes Has High Priority
    • Table 9-4: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Shopping for Clothes, African Americans vs. Others
    • Designer Labels Important
    • Table 9-5: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Apparel Brands, African Americans vs Others
    • Under-30 African Americans Aspire To Be First to Buy Latest Electronic Equipment
    • Table 9-6: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Consumer Electronics, African Americans vs. Others
    • Table 9-7: Ownership of Consumer Electronics by 18- to 29-Year-Olds, African Americans vs. Others
    • More Telecommunications Services Used
    • Table 9-8: Use of Telecommunications Products and Services by 18- to 29-Year-Olds, African Americans vs. Others7
    • Owning a New Car Important to Young African Americans
    • Table 9-9: Vehicle Ownership Patterns of 18- to 29-Olds, African Americans vs. Others
    • Table 9-10: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward New Cars, African Americans vs Others
    • Foreign Cars Have More Prestige
    • Table 9-11: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Olds, Foreign vs. Domestic Cars, African Americans vs. Others

    Key Trends and Strategic Implications
    • Urban Labels Start to Break into Mass Channels
    • Hip-Hop Seen as Fastest Growing Radio Format
    • More Marketers Turn to Hip-Hop Culture

Chapter 10: Marketing and Advertising Trends

  • Overview
    • African American Advertising Seen as Changing over Time
    • Ads Viewed as Having More Leeway
    • Negative Stereotyping Remains Sensitive Issue
    • Advertisers Still Walk Fine Line
    • Celebrities Remain Important
    • Grassroots Marketing Key Component of Strategies
    • Churches Can Be Helpful Grassroots Marketing Partners
    • Film Festivals Draw Advertisers’ Attention

  • Marketing and Promotional Approaches
    • Cognac Importers Compete for Young African American Market
    • Bacardi Looks to Affluent African Americans
    • Bank of America Reaches Out to African American Consumers
    • Kmart Caters to Urban Multicultural Customers
    • Avon Seeks to Increase Number of African American Sales Reps

  • Advertising Strategies and Campaigns
    • African Americans See Benefits of Advertising
    • Table 10-1: Attitudes of African Americans toward Advertising, by Gender
    • Blacks Highly Receptive to TV Advertising
    • Table 10-2: Attitudes of African Americans toward Television Ads, by Gender
    • Print Advertising Rated Highly
    • Table 10-3: Attitudes of African Americans toward Print Advertising, by Gender
    • Outdoor Ads Capture African Americans’ Attention
    • Table 10-4: Attitudes of African Americans toward Outdoor Advertising, by Gender
    • Coca-Cola Looks to Young Trendsetting African Americans
    • P&G Seeks Synergy between General-Market and African American Campaigns
    • Big Three Automakers Target Multicultural Buyers
    • Japanese Automakers Reach Out to Diverse Urban Youth Market

Chapter 11: African Americans and the Media

  • Print
    • African Americans Value Magazines
    • Table 11-1: African American Attitudes toward Print Media, by Gender
    • Black-Oriented Magazine Titles Most Popular Category
    • Table 11-2: Magazines Popular with African Americans, by Gender
    • New Magazines Target Affluent Segment
    • Vanguarde Media Closes Three Magazines
    • Black Newspapers Struggle to Survive

  • Television and Radio
    • African Americans Focus on Television
    • Table 11-3: African American Attitudes toward Television, by Gender
    • Movie Channels Major Draw for Black Viewers
    • Table 11-4: Cable TV Services Popular with African Americans
    • Show Preferences Similar to Population as a Whole
    • Table 11-5: Types of Network Primetime TV Shows Popular with African Americans
    • Fox Draws Most Black Viewers
    • Table 11-6: Broadcast Network Viewing by African Americans
    • New Cable Network Targets African American Adults
    • 24-Hour Black News Channel Launched
    • Radio Important Entertainment Medium
    • Table 11-7: African American Attitudes toward Radio, by Gender
    • Urban Contemporary Tops List of Radio Formats
    • Table 11-8: Radio Formats Popular with African Americans
    • Competition Intensifies in Urban Radio Format

  • New Media
    • Internet Changes Media Usage Habits
    • Table 11-9: Impact of Internet on Media Usage by American Americans, by Gender
    • African Americans More Likely to Download Music Files
    • Table 11-10: Use of Online Media by African Americans, by Gender
    • America Online Launches “AOL Black Focus”

    Section 4: African American Market Trends

Chapter 12: African American Buying Power

  • Aggregate Consumer Expenditures
    • African Americans Responsible for Increasing Share of Total Consumer Expenditures
    • Table 12-1: Aggregate Consumer Expenditures, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 1998 vs. 2002
    • Expenditures on Food Total $37 Billion
    • Table 12-2: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by African American Consumer Units for Food and Beverages
    • Black Households Form Major Market for Household Appliances
    • Table 12-3: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by African American Consumer Units for Household Furnishings and Equipment
    • Apparel Expenditures Top $23 Billion
    • Table 12-4: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by African American Consumer Units for Apparel
    • Auto Purchases Exceed $33 Billion
    • Table 12-5: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by African American Consumer Units for Vehicle Purchases and Related Expenses
    • Home Electronics Products Generate High Interest among Black Consumers
    • Table 12-6: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by African American Consumer Units for Entertainment
    • Personal-Care Products Expenditures Total $6.6 Billion
    • Table 12-7: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by African American Consumers for Personal- Care Products and Services, Reading Materials, and Education

  • African American Buying Power
    • Buying Power Used as Measure of African American Market
    • Scope of African American Market Subject to Interpretation
    • Table 12-8: Size of the African American Population, by Racial Category and Hispanic Origin
    • Buying Power of Black Women Will Increase 35.2%
    • Table 12-9: Projected Growth in Buying Power of African American Women15 Years of Age and Over, 2003-2008
    • Buying Power of Affluent African Americans Will Reach $479 Billion
    • Table 12-10: Projected Growth in Buying Power of Affluent African Americans, 2003-2008
    • African American Buying Power Will Exceed $900 Billion in 2008
    • Table 12-11: Projected Growth in African American Buying Power, 2003-2008

Chapter 13: Geographic Trends in the African American Market

  • Leading Geographic Markets
    • New York Metro Area Most Lucrative Market
    • Table 13-1: Aggregate Household Income of African Americans in Top 25 Metropolitan Areas
    • Washington, D.C. Has Highest Median Household Income
    • Table 13-2: Leading African American Metro Markets, by Median Household Income

  • Key Geographic Trends
    • More than Two Million Blacks Made Interstate Moves in Late 90s
    • Table 13-3: Migration of Black Population within the United States, 1995 to 2000
    • Migration to South Continues
    • Table 13-4: Domestic Migration by Blacks by Region and Census Division, 1995 to 2000
    • Georgia and North Carolina Show Largest Gains from Domestic Migration
    • Table 13-5: States with Largest Gains from Migration by Blacks, 1995 to 2000
    • Black Population Grew Faster in South
    • Figure 13-1: Rate of Population Growth in the South 1990-2000, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
    • Florida Shows Most Growth between 2000 and 2002
    • Table 13-6: States with Fastest-Growing African American Populations, April 2000-July 2002
    • Blacks Join Exodus to Suburbs
    • Table 13-7: African American Population, Metropolitan vs. Non-Metropolitan Residence, 1995 vs. 2002
    • Table 13-8: Suburban Population Growth 1995 vs. 2002, by Race
    • Suburban Blacks Relatively More Affluent
    • Table 13-9: Mean Income of Central City vs. Suburban Residents, Blacks vs. Population Groups
    • Residential Segregation Declines
    • Table 13-10: Trends in Residential Segregation of African Americans in Metropolitan Areas, 1980-2000

  • Strategic Implications
    • Suburbs Begin to Reflect Multicultural Profile of America
    • Suburban Growth Creates New African American Market Segment
    • Table 13-11: Aggregate Income of African American Families, Central City vs. Suburban

Chapter 14: Trends and Opportunities in the African American Market

  • Key Trends
    • Shift in “Ethnic Marketing” Underway
    • Parameters of African American Marketing Start to Blur
    • Multicultural Approach Needs Right Perspective
    • Growing Diversity of Black Population Affects Marketing Strategies

  • Emerging Opportunities
    • Upward Mobility of African Americans Creates More Possibilities for Marketers
    • Central-City African Americans Key Segment
    • Many African American Consumers Still Represent Untapped Market

Appendix: Addresses of Selected U.S. African American Market Resources

  • Advertising/Marketing
  • Publications
  • Other Media

 

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